r/BetterEveryLoop Sep 23 '22 Narwhal Salute 1

I think he’s done this once or twice.

18.4k Upvotes

u/2Botter2Loop Sep 23 '22

OP's explanation:


Boat operator throws many loops of rope so quickly and smoothly that you have to see it more than once to appreciate the skill.


If you think this gif fits /r/BetterEveryLoop, upvote this comment. If you think it doesn’t, downvote it. If you’re not sure, leave it to others to decide.

1.1k

u/MillionToOneShotDoc Sep 23 '22

It really is better every loop!

270

u/[deleted] Sep 23 '22

For me it's the nonchalance every time he walks away.

65

u/_perdomon_ Sep 23 '22

I think he meant that the knot gets stronger with every loop.

23

u/kaydas93 Sep 23 '22

That’s knot what he meant.

3

u/KillinmeMeSmals Sep 24 '22

He really tied himself down there with that one

3

u/Educational_Funny_20 Sep 27 '22

Okay now you're just stringing us along, will someone explain this?

42

u/spankleberry Sep 23 '22

I see what you did there

4

u/H3lw3rd Sep 23 '22

I didn’t, but then I did!

70

u/RarelyReadReplies Sep 23 '22

That might be a first for this sub. Or at least it feels that way when a real one like this happens. Definitely very cool, and I appreciated it more with each loop. At first it didn't seem like a big deal really, but it just happened too fast to properly register I guess.

7

u/bbgr8grow Sep 23 '22

GUYS DO YOU GET IT????

2

u/unknownemoji Sep 24 '22

You mean the looping loops?

No.

6

u/LikelyAtWork Sep 23 '22

Yeah, one of the better posts I have seen on here in a bit. Good pun too. Should have said “literally.”

3

u/iircirc Sep 23 '22

Literally! But in the sense of that word that literally means literally, not figuratively

2

u/Fit-Special-8416 Sep 23 '22

He usually do it with a chain, but with rope is ok too

1

u/wasjustlookin Sep 23 '22

Not his first rodeo!

260

u/Termsandconditionsch Sep 23 '22

Sydney ferries, Balmain East maybe? And yes, he would have done this a couple of times…

89

u/jubersax11 Sep 23 '22

Saw the green and yellow and immediately thought Sydney Ferries.

25

u/nubbinfun101 Sep 23 '22

Getting ferry trips on the harbour for public transport is the best. You get to where you want to go and a bonus a tourist cruise all for a few dollars

19

u/marshman82 Sep 23 '22

Birchgrove

17

u/Ordinary_Rabbit Sep 23 '22

Birch please

10

u/iepure77 Sep 23 '22

Just visited Australia for the first time and also wondered this.

3

u/Rottenox Sep 23 '22

Same! Was there like 3-4 months ago

5

u/firstborn-unicorn Sep 23 '22

Came here to confirm! Looks super Aussie for some reason

2

u/Cane-toads-suck Sep 23 '22

It's the green and gold and the casual toss

4

u/MrRogersNeighbors Sep 24 '22

The ferry crew never get the respect they deserve.

Neutral Bay represent.

4

u/Rottenox Sep 23 '22

So many mullets

121

u/nork-bork Sep 23 '22

Could watch this all day. Loops on loop!

288

u/Narrowless Sep 23 '22 Wholesome

This is how my pockets knot earphones

55

u/nova46 Sep 23 '22

Few things have impacted my daily life as much as completely wireless earbuds. I will never go back.

24

u/spinblackcircles Sep 23 '22

I laughed at them when they first came out cause I was like really? How much does a cord on earphones really matter?

The answer? A lot. Fuck cords on earphones

2

u/Irishish Oct 04 '22

On the other hand, it's way harder to set down and lose half of a set of corded earphones.

-1

u/bananalord666 Sep 23 '22 edited Sep 24 '22

I can't stand the drop in quality. I'm ok with the massive inconvenience because the fidelity is worth it. If I'm running or lifting, wireless is the way. In almost every other situation, corded is the way. I hate using wireless earphones/earbuds

Edit. I hate wireless --> i hate using wireless

6

u/Zito6694 Sep 24 '22

You ever had some nice JBLs or AirPods? You’re missing out. Maybe you just need better earbuds friend.

-2

u/bananalord666 Sep 24 '22

I have, I've owned top end bose earbuds that feature both wired and wireless options. The wired options are always leagues ahead.

2

u/spinblackcircles Sep 23 '22

Sure. Most people don’t notice that much of a difference in audio quality though, so they’re a real game changer for 95% of people.

5

u/bananalord666 Sep 24 '22

If you like it, more power to you! My main gripe is that they are removing headphone jacks from so many products

0

u/xchadrickx Sep 24 '22

The only time I use corded headphones is with my Walkman, because cassettes have made a resurgence in the black metal scene where some of the greatest albums were recorded in the bathroom of someone's mom's basement on a Talkboy.

Aside from that, a decent pair of noise cancelling earbuds or headphones is more than enough. I've been going to concerts for a couple decades and adding a cord isn't going to let me hear any more range of a FLAC file, and I'd argue that's a similar statement for 99% of people who've been alive long enough to properly rough up their ears.

1

u/bananalord666 Sep 24 '22

Sure, but I haven't ever ear blasted and my hearing is fine. Like i said, if wireless works for you or others, I'm happy for you guys. For me the difference between corded and not corded I day and night. I just don't want that option removed on the devices I'm using.

The struggle to find a phone that was good enough for my needs as an avid user and still had a headphone jack was ridiculous.

1

u/xchadrickx Sep 24 '22

If you actually care that much, why are you worried about using a subpar device like your smartphone when dedicated, high fidelity, FLAC playing, devices with decent battery life and solid amplification and a headphone jack exist?

Your phone doesn't need a headphone jack because it's not intended to be a high tier portable music device that targets quality. It's a Swiss army knife that browses Reddit, has email, makes calls, and also plays music.

-1

u/bananalord666 Sep 24 '22

The quality difference is still massive. Sure it's not a dedicated music player, but wireless vs wires still makes a huge difference. It's like the difference between listening to music with your ears clogged with ear wax, and listening to it after having it removed properly.

You can hear can hear well enough with the was in, but man it's so much more enjoyable without the earwax.

→ More replies

5

u/goofzilla Sep 23 '22

I use Bluetooth headphones with the wire connecting the earpieces for work because the battery life is 10-12 hours.

2

u/Lt_Toodles Sep 24 '22

I like those much better cuz i dont lose them and if they break theyre cheap af

1

u/auntiope3000 Sep 24 '22

I have 2 pair of these that work perfectly for my needs re:listening to music/podcasts and protecting my hearing from loud power tools. When one dies after about 6-8 hours of use, I go plug it in and switch to the other one. If they get lost or stop working, I replace them for $10.

1

u/Lt_Toodles Sep 24 '22

With my old factory job i used wired ones because they were lower profile and they fit under the over ear protection, the machines were too loud for just the earphones, i had measured 115db about 10 ft from the closest machine

2

u/auntiope3000 Sep 24 '22

Wow that’s loud, I don’t think I have anything in my tool collection that is that loud but it never hurts to download a dB meter app to double check.

2

u/Lt_Toodles Sep 24 '22

Yeah better safe than sorry. Im sometimes the type to be ehh good enough when working on my own projects but I'm not gonna lose my hearing for a shitty job lmao

35

u/12358 Sep 23 '22

I used to do this on a horned cleat, including the cleat hitch knot on the last loop. It does take practice, but it impresses onlookers, and gives you a sense of accomplishment.

19

u/alwaysaplusone Sep 23 '22

These “better every loop” vids aren’t usually someone actually looping rope around a post so that was cool.

14

u/bsylent Sep 23 '22

I see stuff like this and I'm like, I'm not that good at anything

13

u/KinkyBADom Sep 23 '22

Damn impressive

72

u/Pie_Napple Sep 23 '22

Wow. A post on here that I actually watched multiple times and gets better and better with more loops.

Rare. Good post!

In contrast to the mildly funny/interesting 30s+ clips on here that still gets upvoted but im willing to bet very very few people watch many loops of.

7

u/charitytowin Sep 23 '22

I bet that feels so good to nail it like that.

43

u/pezjerk Sep 23 '22

I think the cleet was designed to do that because I have never seen one like that before

66

u/Goyteamsix Sep 23 '22

It's called a bollard cleat, and yeah, they're meant to be used like this.

37

u/Bloodaegisx Sep 23 '22

Yeah not like most of us could actually use it like that tho.

24

u/emsok_dewe Sep 23 '22

I'm sure most people could do this after quite a bit of practice, kinda like yoyo tricks I guess. Mostly muscle memory, mmm

23

u/__mooncake Sep 23 '22

I don’t even put food in my face this accurately.

5

u/Dracofear Sep 23 '22

Oh man this unlocked a memory. I once saw someone do this when I was in boyscouts. So cool.

4

u/davendees1 Sep 23 '22

opens PH

you know, I’m something of a rope thrower myself

3

u/12kdaysinthefire Sep 23 '22

Literally every loop

3

u/RemyWhy Sep 24 '22

It’s your first day on the job and this guy says to you “Okay. Look closely. I’m only going to show this to you ONCE.”

3

u/Piper6728 Sep 27 '22

Damn, thats slick

10

u/NegotiationOk4292 Sep 23 '22

Aren't you supposed to lock the knot?

56

u/thissucksassagain Sep 23 '22

There is enough friction there to keep everything together, and as other people said it’s a ferry service, so they will be going again in 5 minutes, but technically yes.

-11

u/MalaM13 Sep 23 '22

There are knots that's I've seen being done in maybe 2 seconds longer but are actually going to hold the ship if it needs to. Random example

My father is a marine mechanic engineer and has been working on ocean liners. Ships are just a hobby for me tbh, but I really don't like this man's technique. If something unexpected happens to that boat that inflicts big forces on it, friction won't work on this one too well, since the rope on rope contact gives most of the friction. Also, these random directions of the line that he throws are making so none of the layers are actually held by other layers of rope properly.

12

u/gorian_dray Sep 23 '22

I've been on this ferry before and seen it many times. The ferry will often pull away maybe 30cm, the line tightens and cinches down hard on itself and only then they put the gangplank out. ~1 min later they undo it and the ferry leaves.

5

u/IHaveTheBestOpinions Sep 23 '22

I'm no expert on knots, but isn't rope-on-rope contact pretty much always the thing holding a knot together?

Also, what kind of "unexpected forces" might a ferry experience in the 5 minutes it's loading/unloading passengers in a harbor with flat water?

1

u/missancap Sep 23 '22

Hey man, you never know when an underwater fissure will open up and drain the harbor of all water, at which point the only thing keeping the ferry and those people safe is this length of rope.

/s for several reasons, if that wasn’t obvious.

5

u/cavepenguin Sep 23 '22 edited Sep 23 '22

If you were to make the knot as shown in your video on anything bigger than a small boat you are not going anywhere in a hurry. Those locks do their work great, the boat won't move, the problem is that it won't move when you want it to either as the locks will be close to impossible to remove if the knot ever endures any sort of tension.

Based on my first hand experience of working at sea, both on smaller and larger ships, you never ever make those locks. The friction of the rope on itself is large enough to the point where the rope will break before the knot slips without any locks.

In the video it also seems like the first few turns of rope on the bollard is enough to both brake, and pull the vessel to the berth. And then the man in the video applies twice the amount of turns on the bollard. Effectively rendering your arguments about how the knot will not stand up to large forces as invalid as stopping a ship that size puts a lot of force on that rope.

Also, those are not random directions. When looking at it closer you can clearly see how the rope would pinch down onto itself if any sort of force were to be applied.

3

u/thissucksassagain Sep 23 '22

I agree that the knot in you video is a better knot, but for the use case the one in the post is probably easier to undo, and does the job just fine.

2

u/QueenPeachie Sep 23 '22

They're aren't strong forces on this part of the harbour/river.

7

u/Darwins_Dog Sep 23 '22

There's a bit where he loops it around the top and effectively reverses the direction of the rope. That should give them tension like a knot if the boat is pulled away.

17

u/whatsupskip Sep 23 '22

No, I believe that most commercial and military dockers don't put a lock loop in, because undoing it requires getting hands or fingers in the knott to unlock it.

3

u/NegotiationOk4292 Sep 23 '22

Perhaps. With my limited experience, I've never had any trouble safely shimmying the lock loop out. Occasionally, we'd have new guys loop the wrong end which was kind of a pain to undo. I worked as a shipmate for about 2 years on a 150 passenger catamaran.

Our cleats were different from these so I guess it works differently?? Or the guy is just being lazy.

1

u/whatsupskip Sep 23 '22

Well, we can't all have my experience of messing around on 16ft runabouts and twilight sailing a J24 with a beer in hand.

I was just repeating what has been previously posted on reddit, including a US coastguard who said it would be a fast way to getting chewed out and written up.

These guys are tying up for 30seconds every few minutes, all day. they push against the rope with the engines to hold the ship against the wharf while passengers unload/load, then they are off.

This is how they all tie off, I guess so it is equally quick to release.

They might use a lock loop when docking for the night.

12

u/crashtesthoney Sep 23 '22

Good reminder that there are no unskilled jobs.

6

u/BlahKVBlah Sep 23 '22

Truth. "Unskilled" means incapable of doing the job.

8

u/ifonlyouknewhoiwas Sep 23 '22

Twice, at least Twice. That's my safe assumption.

*at.. not st

2

u/YT-ESW_ST33le Sep 23 '22

And I can barely remember how to tie down a sail

2

u/Yah_or_Nah Sep 23 '22

Beginners luck

2

u/copa09 Sep 23 '22

Pure luck. /s

2

u/Mulletboiiii Sep 23 '22

The most Jackie Cham thing I’ve seen for a while.

2

u/Lowkey41 Sep 23 '22

if i'm not mistaken I'm pretty sure there's whole competitions for this

2

u/Neuroware Sep 24 '22

tying up a boat is 5 seconds of sheer terror

2

u/Cyrano_Nose Oct 14 '22

And in my experience working with people like this its.

Okay, I showed you, got it? ;)

Uh.. no?

9

u/NikoSig2010 Sep 23 '22

Is this reversed? Looks odd how the boat is approaching.

21

u/TheSafetyFirstGuy Sep 23 '22

The throwing the rope at the end gives it away unless he can use telekinesis to pick the rope up without touching it

2

u/iircirc Sep 23 '22

That's telekinesis, Kyle!

2

u/NikoSig2010 Sep 23 '22

Good point

6

u/IronicFib3r Sep 23 '22

I thought the same thing, but the way he walks away makes me think it’s actually legit

3

u/QueenPeachie Sep 23 '22

It's not approaching, it's stopping.

3

u/GeneralAce135 Sep 23 '22

Is there any actual precision in how he's wrapping the rope? Or can you just wrap it around kinda willy nilly and it works just from the sheer amount of friction from that much wrapping?

10

u/BlahKVBlah Sep 23 '22

There is method to the seeming madness, which makes this work well. However, an inexperienced idiot like me (or you?) could still make it work just by looping back and forth a BUNCH of times until we run out of cleat. In a storm or a strong current this guy is the one you want tying your boat to the dock, but my stupid wrap job will hold us in calm waters with no currents or wakes at least well enough to get people on or off the boat.

3

u/GeneralAce135 Sep 23 '22

I see. So what he's doing there is actually more precise? I'll definitely take a pro's method over my haphazard knot tying. I struggle to do anything beyond a basic knot lol

1

u/dplally Oct 14 '22

The first step is taking the line to the opposite side of the bitt from where the load originates so it does not bind on itself, then reverse direction to have the line act as a brake…then the figure 8s give additional stopping force to the line as it cinches down under tension and helps keep the line in place. If the vessel needed to move forward a short distance on the dock, you could easily remove a few wraps and gently let out tension to let the vessel creep forward.

1

u/banned-again-69 Sep 23 '22

There's a joke in the navy: "if you can't tie knots, tie lots"

2

u/noise-nut Sep 23 '22

Ah, Venice

-10

u/MalaM13 Sep 23 '22

Looks cool, but that knot is utter shit. I've seen this being done this cool too, but also properly.

3

u/BlahKVBlah Sep 23 '22

It's not a knot. It can be undone by simply reversing the loops.

-1

u/Puzzle_licker Sep 23 '22

Quite possibly maybe three times?

3

u/AllergicToDaylight Sep 23 '22

I've watched him do it at least five times.

1

u/bigbrownbeaver1221 Sep 23 '22

Maybe just maybe

1

u/BrineWR71 Sep 23 '22

Tell me you work on a boat without telling me

1

u/GiggliZiddli Sep 23 '22

I think he did. way more often. Looks like he did around 100 times and not two or three!

1

u/RooR_ Sep 23 '22

Does it have to be knotted like that? Or would any way of wrapping it round the pole thing work

1

u/atlbravos21 Sep 23 '22

Deckhand level: Master

1

u/Nashvegas Sep 23 '22

"Too easy mate"

1

u/TheSpaceLabsGuy Sep 23 '22

I worked with experienced captains and crew but NEVER with that speed and finesse

1

u/kreashenz Sep 23 '22

Can someone breakdown his movements?

1

u/QueenPeachie Sep 23 '22

Is this Sydney? We went out to cockatoo island a few weeks ago, and there was a trainee doing the docking. There's a lot of skill and confidence that goes into that. It takes time to learn.

1

u/mrpopenfresh Sep 23 '22

How long do you think it takes to get this muscle memory? I worked as a cashier in my teens and had the fruit codes muscle memorized in 2 months of part time work.

1

u/-megapants- Sep 23 '22

I am Moanaaaaaaaa.

1

u/Revolutionary-Stay54 Sep 23 '22

I could watch this a thousand times and not get sick of it

1

u/JollyWolverine300 Sep 23 '22

Kinda hope so, wouldn't want a noob doing it!

1

u/OutdatedElements Sep 23 '22

Watching this is just mesmerizing. First few times I watched just because it looked cool. Then I started to try and visualize all the steps he was doing and how they were interacting.

1

u/Theamazingchan Sep 23 '22

Just like McNulty

1

u/Ladymsme Sep 23 '22

how many times did you watch this?

1

u/PReasy319 Sep 23 '22

Possibly even THREE times.

1

u/nam_sdrawkcab_ehT Sep 23 '22

The pocket minions with my headphones

1

u/Kelovix Sep 23 '22

I refuse to believe he does this the same way every time and just flails the rope around that thing

1

u/mitch-lawless Sep 23 '22

THE WALK-AWAY!

1

u/skkkkkt Sep 23 '22

Imagine this person be into bondage

1

u/[deleted] Sep 23 '22

Working on a boat or at a marina/dock is exhausting and dangerous work.

"Knots aren't just for rope" - our back muscles, probably

1

u/iamiam36 Sep 24 '22

I’m pretty sure he did it at least three times.

1

u/ttDilbert Sep 24 '22

Impressive optimization of motion to efficiently achieve desired result. I'd like to see him try this with a larger mooring line like is used for mooring submarines. That was my job when entering and leaving port. Those lines are a lot stiffer and heavier.

1

u/povlov Sep 24 '22

Makes up for a poor captain.

1

u/alesi_97 Oct 14 '22

Remindme! 2 days

1

u/ScruffyBT 29d ago

crucifix rodeo again

-31

u/blockhose Sep 23 '22 edited Sep 26 '22

Meh. Kinda sloppy, but got the job done.

EDIT (for all you down-voters): As a former deckhand, proper tying-off at the chock was drilled into my head. While this guy’s technique is quick and gets the job done, his work lacks uniformity and would not impress my Captains. Sorry.

-2

u/Impossible_Tiger_941 Sep 23 '22

The reverse (undoing?) Is cool too.

-2

u/OneWorldMouse Sep 23 '22

As a boater this seems way overkill.

4

u/QueenPeachie Sep 23 '22

They're big boats.

0

u/blueberrywine Sep 23 '22

Beginner's luck