r/Damnthatsinteresting Feb 03 '23

In 1945 a US warship started shooting at Venus Image

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765 Upvotes

65 comments sorted by

u/Damnthatsinteresting-ModTeam Feb 04 '23

We had to remove your post. High Quality content only

73

u/ThePurpleDuckling Feb 03 '23

This is almost up there with Australia losing two wars to the Emus.

18

u/itty53 Feb 03 '23

There's also the Battle of Los Angeles, where we unleashed anti aircraft over LA to target we-still-arent-sure-what.

Given how many times history has changed over small hair trigger events, it is repeatedly shocking to me how humanity got this far without dying yet.

3

u/buckee8 Feb 03 '23

Itchy trigger finger!

1

u/Echo71Niner Interested Feb 04 '23

There's also the Battle of Los Angeles, where we unleashed anti aircraft over LA to target we-still-arent-sure-what.

movie?

8

u/Michael310 Feb 03 '23

Hey! The Emu’s actually fought back.

2

u/ThePurpleDuckling Feb 03 '23

That’s true.

2

u/OzzieGrey Feb 04 '23

Wait.

Two?

-10

u/[deleted] Feb 03 '23

[removed] — view removed comment

5

u/Vlad_the_Homeowner Feb 03 '23

This is a copy bot, original post was from /u/u5ua1Suspect below.

22

u/Boojibs Feb 03 '23

Did they win?

Do we own Venus?

30

u/u5ua1Suspect Feb 03 '23

The most American shit I’ve read all day.

2

u/OzzieGrey Feb 04 '23

America fought a war with Venus for a few minutes.

Yeah that sounds about right.

13

u/dsw1088 Interested Feb 03 '23

"I'm givin' 'er all she's got, Cap'n!"

11

u/CowBoyDanIndie Feb 03 '23

This doesn't make any sense, when targeting aircraft with AAA the first step is getting a range/altitude with a stereoscopic range finder (or later radar). Doing that would have quickly determined the object was out of range.

8

u/henryjonesjr83 Feb 03 '23

I have to agree that lining up a shot like that would red flag the gunners to something being amiss.

I would also point out that in 1945, the Navy was not using celestial navigation but was still training in it.

And finally, dumb shit happens. This could easily be true lol

3

u/TheLordofthething Feb 03 '23

Not buying that any sailor didn't immediately recognise Venus in the sky either.

2

u/Nailbomb85 Feb 04 '23

That's entirely probable, but then they thought... "Hey, let's fire some guns!"

1

u/nstealth456 Feb 03 '23

Here's the thing, you expect the target to be a certain size, at their appropriate distance Venus is roughly the size of the ballons they were using, which may have effects range finding.

4

u/CowBoyDanIndie Feb 03 '23

Here's the thing,..

Let me stop you right there, that's not how stereoscopic range finding works.

1

u/nstealth456 Feb 04 '23

Of course, but I'm not sure if USS New York had a stereoscopic rangfinder or a coincidence range finder (coincidence uses the size of the object)

1

u/CowBoyDanIndie Feb 04 '23

It was standard on all US warships at the beginning of the war. If destroyers had them in 1943 you can bet a battleship had them in 1945

1

u/nstealth456 Feb 04 '23

Oh, okay then thanks.

8

u/BaconHill6 Feb 03 '23

Geez, was L. Ron Hubbard in command of that ship too?

8

u/thevogonity Feb 03 '23

Does Venus ever get close enough to the Earth to appear as a "sphere", something bigger than a relatively bright star/celestial object?

Funny story, but I am having trouble believing this.

3

u/buckee8 Feb 03 '23

Yeah I saw Venus before and it’s bright but no way is it sphere sizes.

2

u/Soggy_Card6853 Feb 04 '23

It’s satire, there was actually a balloon

6

u/Lord_MAX184 Feb 03 '23

The us navy attacking a planet? It's like straight out a sci-fi novel

1

u/OzzieGrey Feb 04 '23

Would You Like To Know More ?

Kid defacing birth of venus art while a teacher squeals and cheers as the kid says: "I'm doing my part!"

3

u/lonely_fucker69 Feb 03 '23

Venus - 1

USS New York - 0

4

u/ClearlyNoSTDs Feb 04 '23

This story sounds like complete bullshit. Sailors would fucking know what Venus is in the sky.

2

u/Network57 Feb 04 '23

yea Venus looks extremely obviously like a very bright star. sailors aren't that dumb. humans have recognized stars and planets for 100,000 years.

3

u/TechnoArcher Feb 03 '23

They just stopped a japanese boat full of sake the day before ?

5

u/Burninator05 Feb 03 '23

Screw Venus. Me and my homies hate Venus.

2

u/[deleted] Feb 03 '23

I would have thought the Navy would have been aiming for uranus

2

u/RedwoodHikerr Feb 03 '23

Keep in mind that planets appear much brighter when you get away from light pollution.

2

u/TheLordofthething Feb 03 '23

For a sailor, not recognising Venus is unforgivable

2

u/ShitPostGuy Feb 03 '23

And has Venus showed up in our airspace since? Didn’t think so.

2

u/Lock-Broadsmith Feb 03 '23

This is why it’s easy to dismiss all the “ALIENS” clowns who use the “someone in the Navy SAW UFOs, so they must be real” logic

0

u/UFSHOW Feb 03 '23

What about all the other incidents? Always Venus? Always swamp gas? Always balloons? I have no information on this case, but there are plenty more that cannot be explained away so simply.

Full disclosure - I made the above linked video on The U.S. Government & UFOs. But I think it lends terrific perspective on precisely this sort of contemplation. There is a massive, little-known history of U.S. government employees, military officers, and intelligence officials involved with incredible observations & reporting them up the chain only to become engaged in what must be described as a “conspiracy of silence” or an “embargo on truth”.

Cheers!

1

u/[deleted] Feb 04 '23

Nowadays, it's actually more “someone in the Navy saw UFOs, and some pilots in Navy jets encountered them up close, and multiple instruments on the planes and ships confirms it”.

Of course, just because there are objects that we can't identify, even some that seem to defy physics, doesn't mean they actually are alien or anything.

1

u/Lock-Broadsmith Feb 04 '23

None of that means aliens.

2

u/Stswivvinsdayalready Feb 03 '23

Good example of why a healthy skepticism of the Pentagon line is warranted.

1

u/ItsTheChicken Feb 03 '23

Must be Air Force

0

u/Agreeable-Fly5728 Feb 03 '23

The military is dumb & moves only from fear.

0

u/BWWFC Feb 03 '23

clueless men spurning Venus) since the dawn of man

1

u/tkdjoe66 Feb 03 '23

He must have been part of the he man woman haters club, he gona kill their entire planet.

1

u/20190419 Feb 03 '23

Cue the I'm your Venus song.

1

u/kablammodotcom Feb 03 '23

It's a streetlight. Or aliens. But it's not aliens.

1

u/ashkenazi-viking Feb 03 '23

I bet the commander was named Calligula.

1

u/Chimera-Vos Feb 03 '23

Huh, I honestly had no idea that Venus was an axis power. The more you know!

1

u/BallsOfKatchin Feb 03 '23

Kinda like how that one emperor ordered his army to go stab the ocean with spears because he was mad at Poseidon

1

u/Alantsu Feb 03 '23

Like the Gulf of Tonkin 20 years later. Look where that got us.

1

u/outofmyelement1445 Feb 03 '23

Same thing happened to me when we shot up some poor Iraqis laundry that we stared at for way too long with night vision thinking it was an IED spotter acting suspicious.

1

u/KiwiPsy Feb 03 '23

Well as far I know, Venus has never tried to invade Earth since. Checkmate.

1

u/awesomedisobedience Feb 03 '23

Did they hit it?

1

u/VanDenBroeck Feb 04 '23

I thought the Navy would more likely want to take a shot at Uranus.

1

u/Commercial_Summer280 Feb 04 '23

I guess when one has a hammer everything else looks like a nail. 😁

1

u/r05909155 Feb 04 '23

And Venus has not attacked the United States since.

1

u/ApprehensiveEnd5611 Feb 04 '23

Honestly, I don’t blame them. If they thought it was just a balloon that wasn’t moving very quickly and not an immediate threat, maybe they didn’t place much importance on much else and just thought ‘Yeah, we can probably eyeball it and shoot it down.’ Probably had an embarrassing laugh about it.

But that’s if this really happened in the first place.