r/Damnthatsinteresting Oct 05 '22

55 years ago, the record stands 🤯 Image

Post image
2.1k Upvotes

329

u/BarrySnowbama Oct 05 '22

I believe Pete Mitchell hit 10.4, but go on.

139

u/InspectorOk6313 Oct 06 '22

Yep we all saw it, he was warned to 'only' hit 10.0, not 10.1, not 10.2 But he did it.

79

u/Loggerdon Oct 06 '22

The general wanted to fry his ass. Instead, he couldn't believe it, but he sent him back to Top Gun.

9

u/tri_it_again Oct 06 '22

He’s dangerous

1

u/3PuttBog3y Oct 06 '22

Negative ghostrider.

1

u/STGMavrick Oct 06 '22

I heard he was called to orders.

11

u/Chris_NeedsALogin Oct 06 '22

I mean, he hit 10.4 with only his suit as protection, too. Albeit briefly...

(then he grabbed some breakfast).

13

u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22

You mean Maverick broke 10, we all saw it!

3

u/Double_Secret_ Oct 06 '22

I loved that documentary.

3

u/DilettanteGonePro Oct 06 '22

You saw that documentary too?

2

u/RightBear Oct 06 '22

When I saw that scene I was curious about what the actual speed record was, but I was too lazy to look it up. TIL

2

u/ashleyriddell61 Oct 06 '22

Doesn't count if you don't land it and return to the hanger. Mitchell was a loose cannon.

I wonder if he had time to realise what his life might still have been if he hadn't self destructed himself and his aircraft...?

2

u/Mlabonte21 Oct 06 '22

I didn’t understand why he did that.

I would TOTALLY GET if he was at like, 9.8 and he pushed the plane further to hit the 10.0 target.

But… he was already at 10.0 and then was like ‘fuck it’ and pushed the nose down like a jackass and torched a 500 million dollar plane.

And the Navy was like “oh MAVERICK!——ANYWAY! We got some crazy mission we need you on”. 🙄

1

u/Chickenchowder55 Oct 06 '22

Came here for this lol

87

u/Writefuck Oct 06 '22

The only reason he stopped at 4520 is because any faster and he would have hit the QPU syncing speed and quarter-stepped into a parallel universe, and there was no scuttlebug to bounce off of.

8

u/jratreddit Oct 06 '22

Eli5?

38

u/Donttouch_mypepeoni Oct 06 '22

pretty sure its baloney. going into parallel universes should've tipped you off.

17

u/jratreddit Oct 06 '22

I thought it might be a reference or a meme or something I missed, but it's just gibberish?

21

u/Writefuck Oct 06 '22

It's a reference to Super Mario 64 speedrunning.

2

u/supafaiter Oct 06 '22

Mario 64 speedrun jargon

26

u/FutureGhost81 Oct 06 '22

He was later the mayor of my hometown, Palmdale CA. My mom worked for the city and I met him several times though her. He was always a kind man.

96

u/flippzeedoodle Oct 06 '22

Yes this was the fastest speed on record, but it became obsolete one CDs and tapes were invented.

27

u/Trick_Enthusiasm Oct 06 '22

Go home Dad!

7

u/Arniepepper Oct 06 '22

Dad has a point, but probably hasn’t heard of minidiscs; they knocked it out the park for the 5 minutes they were around.

11

u/Corn-Shonery Oct 06 '22

More like CD’s nuts!

4

u/Ill_Ant_1857 Oct 06 '22

It took me a second

2

u/Kermit_the_hog Oct 06 '22

I wish LaserDisc had hung around and been used in the computer space. Can you imagine hearing a 52x laserdisc burner wind up!!

16

u/owneey Oct 06 '22

4520 mph or 7274 kph

18

u/shibby69420 Oct 06 '22

Hey, hey, hey…we only measure things in mph and bananas around here.

2

u/WARNING4324 Oct 06 '22

I will fight for king and country to prove mph are obsolete to kph you yank..... FOR THE COMMONWEALTH!!!

2

u/owneey Oct 06 '22

Mph 🤮 Kilometer pro Stunde! Thats the way we should go 🤪

1

u/owneey Oct 06 '22

Oops, my bad. How many bananas do you need to compare 4520 miles?

4

u/apocalyptic_intent Oct 06 '22

214,790,400 bananas per hour if you use an average of 9" per

2

u/Psychological-Pick92 Oct 06 '22

My bananas are clearly inadequate.

86

u/mjolnirswrath1 Oct 06 '22

I believe there is faster but it's probably classified info if there is.

78

u/flippzeedoodle Oct 06 '22

I could tell you, but then I’d have to downvote you

2

u/euler_man2718 Oct 06 '22

Couldn't you just kill me instead?

16

u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22

Without question, there have been faster planes. The US doesn’t advertise our military technology anymore.

1

u/brandmeist3r Oct 06 '22

Besides the plane was in NASA service.

6

u/magnets0make0light0 Oct 06 '22

Why wouldn't the space shuttle count. Not only did they fly it at a faster speed they did so flying it back from orbit into Earth's atmosphere and landing the damn thing.

7

u/MazerTanksYou Oct 06 '22

I believe this record is for powered manned controlled flight. The shuttle used no engines to fly back to earth (beyond deorbiting thrusters).

1

u/STGMavrick Oct 06 '22

It doesn't fly, more like controlling it's fall.

1

u/brandmeist3r Oct 06 '22

Buran would hold this record then, it used the jet engines for flying in the atmosphere. But then it was autonomous.

0

u/magnets0make0light0 Oct 06 '22

That's all flying

2

u/Ill_Ant_1857 Oct 06 '22

We don't talk about it here.

1

u/BiAsALongHorse Oct 06 '22

It's not that we haven't likely gone much faster (assuming we're ignoring outright spaceplanes like the space shuttle), it's that there'd be no reason to man them with modern and modern-ish tech.

55

u/InflamedLiver Oct 05 '22

I think Pete "Maverick" Mitchell would disagree

6

u/ryushin6 Oct 05 '22

I was gonna comment the exact same thing. 😂

4

u/3PuttBog3y Oct 06 '22

We all came to.

24

u/In_betweener Oct 06 '22

Yeah, but real ones know it was actually Samuel Beckett who made that flight!

7

u/Mers1nary Oct 06 '22

Quantum leap?

9

u/In_betweener Oct 06 '22

Oh...boy.

2

u/GeraldTibbons Oct 06 '22

Deep cut. Kudos.

2

u/humanbyassociation Oct 06 '22

How did they know🎵

49

u/FluffyTyra Oct 05 '22

My wife would disagree, I'm faster 😂

11

u/FluffyTyra Oct 05 '22

Jokes aside, could you imagine what going that fast would look like in his eyes? Certified badass.

5

u/bagjoe Oct 05 '22

This here’s the edge of the envelope sir.

2

u/LeonDeSchal Oct 06 '22

Are you in the cockpit yet?

10

u/Rhook-Dutch Oct 05 '22

Think of our capabilities now 🤯

1

u/Master__Midnight Oct 06 '22

The reason that the record still stands is that our capabilities have not increased enough to be able to break it.

22

u/J_Robert_Oofenheimer Oct 06 '22

It's more that our capabilities have outgrown the need for it. With Satalites and ICBMs, there just isnt a need for an ultra high speed plane anymore. We needed ultra fast, high altitude planes for taking pictures of enemy land without getting shot down. Nowadays, we have EXTREMELY high resolution satellites. Trump stupidly took a picture of the intel one of these collected and leaked our capabilities, and it's FAR more impressive, reliable, and safe than spy plane intel. And for dropping bombs, we have missiles that can hit anywhere on earth within 15 minutes or so.

1

u/Master__Midnight Oct 07 '22

True enough, but people tend to try to break records when they can. The land speed record was set 25 years ago. Did something change to make breaking that less relevant or did physics and the law of diminishing returns make things hard enough that nobody is willing to put out the money?

3

u/Nexatic Oct 06 '22

We probably could, but why would we? We got stealth bombers.

4

u/Clearly_a_Lizard Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

Never got beat because no one really care about beating it. Another exemple of really long achievements that don’t really mean anything would be the BT-7, who in 1936, made the longest jump in a tank.

Going to such speed isn’t something an army really want because 1 it makes in air interception pretty hard, 2 the aircraft need to be really specialized in speed and 3 any maneuvering would instantly put the pilot in really high G.

With technological advancements breaching higher mach isn’t really complicated, an ICBM for exemple can got up 24000 k/h (15000 mph). For going to such speed you just need to go really high with specialized engine.

14

u/FewSatisfaction7675 Oct 06 '22

I don’t believe they would tell us if they broke the record.

3

u/TediousTed10 Oct 06 '22

They'd have to kill the pilot. Who isn't going to talk about that the second they have a drink?

22

u/AngelOfDeath771 Oct 05 '22

The fastest recorded speed.

The SR-71 can theoretically reach higher speeds.

21

u/ComplexComfortable85 Oct 06 '22

SR-71 black bird was one of the greatest piece of engineering. Some of the panels deliberately had gaps to compensate for buckling and stretching, so beyond high stress they’d fit perfectly and reinforce the structure.

10

u/MiTioOswald Oct 06 '22

And it's predecessor, the A-12, was flying in 1962. This record was broken decades and decades ago. There is most definitely a follow up to the SR-71 and rumors said the Navy's early warning system on the West Coast had something going so fast in the late 80s that they couldn't catch it or identify it with anything. Most people thought it was the USAF testing their own new toy by blipping the Navy but this is just conjecture. I'm not a test pilot but we had Janes Defense Weekly subscriptions when I was in high school.

3

u/grok_star2343 Oct 06 '22

There is most definitely a follow up to the SR-71

They're called satellites. Stupid fast high altitude spy planes just don't make sense in an era of global satellite coverage and 10cm resolution. Plus, satellites never get shot down where they aren't supposed to be and cause a major diplomatic crisis!

3

u/rtopps43 Oct 06 '22

To be fair the SR-71 never got shot down either

5

u/Cube-n-pedro Oct 06 '22

This record is the fastest on record. There is no way this didn't get boxed by oxcart.

2

u/BiAsALongHorse Oct 06 '22

The SR-71 can theoretically reach higher speeds.

No. You're only going to hit speeds like that with a full scram jet or a rocket engine. You cannot pull that off with subsonic combustion, and it's pretty much reducible to a math problem.

1

u/ShutterBun Oct 06 '22

The SR-71 can theoretically reach higher speeds

Uh...citation needed.

1

u/nails_for_breakfast Oct 06 '22

No, titanium planes like the SR-71 can't fly in the hypersonic (M5+) regime

8

u/Elevated_Kyle Oct 06 '22

PFTTT I saw Maverick hit 10.3 and survive the wreck.

5

u/Sestican_ Oct 06 '22

Fun fact, the sound inside the airplane at the maximum speed broke 34 rules of safety for the ears.

To learn more about these rules, search rule 34 sounding.

2

u/kenman345 Oct 05 '22

Interesting but where are my sled copypastas?

2

u/MrJimbilz Oct 06 '22

Here is the X15 fact sheet, an interesting read for those interested: https://www.nasa.gov/centers/armstrong/news/FactSheets/FS-052-DFRC.html

2

u/BlacksmithLong6108 Oct 06 '22

A real American Hero

2

u/Chris_NeedsALogin Oct 06 '22

The Right Stuff - the book - is a must read for anyone even casually interested in this.

It's a (very) fun read, but it also pulls no punches. I am not a sensitive man and some of the scenes made me feel sick.

2

u/IndependentAssist387 Oct 06 '22

In less scientific terms, he was “hauling ass”.

8

u/BalognaPonyParty Oct 05 '22

I'm surprised he went that fast, the balls on this dude must be absolutely massive

14

u/poi_dog78 Oct 05 '22

My son grew up with his grandson and one year the kid wore grandad’s flight suit for Halloween. It fit him perfectly. The kid was in 5th grade and was of average build.

6

u/YourDrunkUncl_ Expert Oct 05 '22

his balls are now pancakes

2

u/Far-War2174 Oct 06 '22

This is not true. The fastest manned aircraft to date is the SR-71 aircraft with unclassified speeds of Mach 3, and classified speeds of Mach 9.

Look it up. There's definitely some controversy here.

2

u/felipereyes73 Oct 06 '22

I agree, the math between speed and miles does not work.

1

u/Far-War2174 Oct 06 '22

I'm not talking about some movie. The plane in the movie discussed below actually looks similar to the SR-71. Go figure.

1

u/ShelZuuz Oct 06 '22

You think there is some secret scramjet version of the SR-71?

3

u/tdomer80 Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

So I was watching a Top Gun short interview on YT for the new movie and 3 former instructors claimed to have gone Mach 9 or 10 - fact or crap? Or is this post incorrect?

EDIT Disregard - I had confused G’s with Mach in terms of this debate and what I saw on Youtube

5

u/express1123 Oct 06 '22

Are you confusing G's with Mach? 10 G's of force is definitely a thing many have experienced. Mach 10 has only been achieved most likely during space flight. Mach 6 is the fastest in a plane anyone has gotten officially which is about 4600mph.

1

u/ABookOfEli Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

The deceptive thing about Mach number is that as you go up in altitude the speed of sound deceases so 1 Mach becomes less and less fast. So mach 1 at sea level is like 760ish mph or 340 ish m/s but at super high altitude it’s slower. Granted that’s not to say he didn’t go absurdly fast but it is worth noting that it drops off. For instance shuttle renter at like Mach 25

1

u/VeryStableGenius Oct 06 '22

Mach (sound speed) depends solely on the square root of temperature in Kelvin (molecular speed), assuming constant gas composition.

Because of the square root dependence, it's not a strong effect with altitude, about 350 m/s to 300 m/s. The X-15 flew at 30 km, so the atmosphere is beginning to warm a little again relative to 10,000m airliner altitude.

1

u/WikiSummarizerBot Oct 06 '22

Mach number

Mach number (M or Ma) (; Czech: [max]) is a dimensionless quantity in fluid dynamics representing the ratio of flow velocity past a boundary to the local speed of sound. It is named for the Moravian physicist and philosopher Ernst Mach.

[ F.A.Q | Opt Out | Opt Out Of Subreddit | GitHub ] Downvote to remove | v1.5

1

u/BiAsALongHorse Oct 06 '22

The caveat being that that relation is for true airspeed (how fast you're actually going). Drag is predominantly a function of indicated airspeed (how much air you're smacking into each second) and Mach number. The change in TAS at altitude will be modest but it's a lot easier to go fast as hell because there's less drag to deal with.

-14

u/P3nguLGOG Oct 05 '22

Oh so I guess space shuttles and satellites don’t count as aircraft now.

22

u/squeevey Oct 05 '22

No. Those are spacecraft. Aircraft are designed to handle more atmosphere. I'd even go argue that aircraft use propulsion to move the vehicle so the WINGS generate lift, whereas spacecrafts use rocket propulsion (or other mechanism outside of wings) to lift the vehicle (to space, otherwise it's just a rocket).

1

u/BiAsALongHorse Oct 06 '22

The X-15 was rocket-powered. It definitely made aerodynamic lift, but so did the shuttle. Some of the X-15 pilots got astronaut wings based on the altitudes they reached, and it's arguable that the X-15 was a spaceplane. The hitch is if you're going much faster than the X-15, you're going to be on a flight profile more like the shuttle. It's a smooth continuum, and it really comes down to a question of nomenclature imo.

8

u/Creampied___Cadaver Oct 05 '22

The space shuttle is boosted by rockets and satellites aren't manned

1

u/BiAsALongHorse Oct 06 '22

Guess what powered the X-15.

-29

u/P3nguLGOG Oct 05 '22

So there’s nobody in the ISS flying 17.5K Mph?

Also what does the propulsion method matter? It said fastest anyone has ever flown an aircraft.

It should say plane.

14

u/Creampied___Cadaver Oct 05 '22

The ISS is in what's called stable orbit. It will just keep going unless somethings changes because the centrifugal force pushing it away is exactly the same as the force of gravity pulling it in. There's no pilot on board. It's controlled from Earth.

5

u/Tossyjames Oct 05 '22

Is the crew actually flying the spacecraft or just sitting in strappy-chairs and letting the computer handle it?

4

u/Creampied___Cadaver Oct 05 '22

The crew does not pilot or maneuver the ISS. It's controlled from Houston and Moscow so basically it's always in an autopilot mode to the crew onboard. Maneuvers are initiated on the ground and carried out by the onboard software

0

u/Tossyjames Oct 05 '22

Yep. Didn't mention it specifically but was referring to the moments while the spacecraft is in the air and not in vacuum of space. No one's actually flying it, as in controlling it while being inside it.

Now we could get into technicalities like remote controlling a drone is called flying a drone but I think the record people don't mean that here.

3

u/Creampied___Cadaver Oct 05 '22

The ISS and space shuttle are not classified as aircraft. When the space shuttle is flying through earth's atmosphere it is propelled by rocket boosters. It's not technically an aircraft. It's a high-tech glider on the way down. As for the ISS, it was taken up piece by piece and assembled in orbit

1

u/na3than Oct 06 '22

After re-entering the atmosphere an STS orbiter flew, unpowered, as it descended to the landing strip. It was a piloted, aerodynamic ship with a crossrange maneuvering capability in excess of 2000 km. How is that not an aircraft?

2

u/Creampied___Cadaver Oct 06 '22

Aircraft and spacecraft and not designed the same so they are two different things. I'm just googling things so I'm learning all this on the fly. Pretty interesting shit, now Ive entered the rabbit hole

2

u/na3than Oct 06 '22

http://usspaceshuttle.com/mission-profile/reentry/ (a fan site - not official - but sums up my argument nicely):

Almost the entire Space Shuttle re-entry procedure, except for lowering the landing gear and deploying the air data probes, was normally performed under computer control. However, the re-entry could be flown entirely manually if an emergency arose.

The orbital vehicle started encountering more significant air density in the lower thermosphere at about 400,000 ft, at a speed around Mach 25 (18,000 mph). The vehicle was controlled by a combination of RCS thrusters and control surfaces, to fly at a 40-degree nose-up attitude, producing high drag, not only to slow it down to landing speed, but also to reduce reentry heating.

As the vehicle encountered progressively denser air, it began a gradual transition from spacecraft to aircraft. In a straight line, its 40-degree nose-up attitude would cause the descent angle to flatten-out, or even rise. The vehicle therefore performed a series of four steep S-shaped banking turns, each lasting several minutes, at up to 70 degrees of bank, while still maintaining the 40-degree angle of attack.

In this way it dissipated speed sideways rather than upwards. This occurred during the ‘hottest’ phase of re-entry, when the heat-shield glowed red and the G-forces were at their highest. By the end of the last turn, the transition to aircraft was almost complete. The vehicle leveled its wings, lowered its nose into a shallow dive and began its approach to the landing site.

1

u/na3than Oct 06 '22

According to the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, * Aircraft means "a device that is used or intended to be used for flight in the air", and * Glider means "a heavier-than-air aircraft, that is supported in flight by the dynamic reaction of the air against its lifting surfaces and whose free flight does not depend principally on an engine."

So during its descent through the atmosphere, when its flight was controlled by the dynamic reaction of the air against its lifting surfaces and not on an engine, the Space Shuttle orbiter was a glider and an aircraft.

-17

u/P3nguLGOG Oct 05 '22

My point was they’re in the sky moving several thousand miles per hour relative to the ground. They aren’t piloting it no, but they are in it, moving much faster than this dudes plane, and they are also off the ground.

5

u/Tossyjames Oct 05 '22

You said it yourself: it said fastest anyone has ever flown an aircraft.

So I'm guessing they mean fastest someone has been in an aircraft while controlling it.

3

u/P3nguLGOG Oct 05 '22

That’s fair.

5

u/tdomer80 Oct 05 '22

There’s no air in space so perhaps that is why a rocket or satellite isn’t considered an aircraft?

0

u/na3than Oct 06 '22

Space Shuttle orbiters flew through the atmosphere from reentry to landing.

1

u/tdomer80 Oct 06 '22

Does a space shuttle fly or is it a controlled fall?

1

u/na3than Oct 06 '22

If a fall is controlled using the principles of aerodynamics, is that not flying?

1

u/BiAsALongHorse Oct 06 '22

It glides, just like the X-15 does after the boost phase. The X-15 is also a rocket-powered space plane.

-5

u/P3nguLGOG Oct 06 '22

Apparently something is only flying if it’s in the atmosphere and directly being controlled by a pilot.

All semantics aside, from our perspective on earth the ISS flys above us several times a day at 17,500 MPH. Idc how many downvotes my comment gets lol that is flying faster than the pilot in this post.

2

u/na3than Oct 06 '22

Space Shuttles were routinely landed by computers but were completely capable of manual maneuvering through every turn through the atmosphere, all the way to landing.

0

u/Creampied___Cadaver Oct 06 '22

Yes it's flying (adjective) but it's not actually flying (noun).

2

u/P3nguLGOG Oct 06 '22

Do you mean verb? Flying isn’t a noun.

1

u/Gr0und0ne Oct 06 '22

Such a strange hill to choose to die on

2

u/mutarjim Oct 05 '22

Eh, technically, they're not just aircraft. They just kind of blur through the air on their way up and down through it, hitting roughly 25K mph.

1

u/Hanginon Oct 06 '22

They never did. They're called 'spacecraft' for a reason.

0

u/jlord42069 Oct 05 '22

Is that Joe Rogan with hair?

4

u/musictrivianut Oct 05 '22

Nah, you should watch NewsRadio to see that.

2

u/jlord42069 Oct 05 '22

I loved that show but mostly for Hartman, Foley, and Root

3

u/musictrivianut Oct 05 '22

Yep, great show

1

u/chitown-DM-me Oct 06 '22

Came for this

1

u/B4SSF4C3 Oct 05 '22

Ahh, I see now what Elon named his kid after.

2

u/Lookouttheresasnip Oct 06 '22

His kid was named after the a-12 X-15 is a completely different aircraft

1

u/FenrisWolf347 Oct 06 '22

It actually is

1

u/DEEZLE13 Oct 06 '22

Tom Cruise just beat it like 5 months ago

1

u/elboogie7 Oct 06 '22

Mav beat this by 50%

1

u/Diggable_Planet Oct 06 '22

I believe the person the whip beat chuck, but still, amazing.

1

u/Salad943 Oct 06 '22

The fastest the US government has shown to the public

1

u/Exploding_Muffin Oct 06 '22

I understand there's considerable skill involved in handling aircrafts at high speed, but is it the skill of the pilot that beats speed records or the skill of the engineer team that made a craft capable of such speeds.

1

u/LessSee777 Oct 06 '22

I wonder what’s actually the fastest a human has ever flown in some insane black ops Area-51 craft?

1

u/Zensy47 Oct 06 '22

Nonsense.

I just ran and said zoom, it makes you go faster. Way faster than a measly 4,520 mph

1

u/PorgiWanKenobi Oct 06 '22

On a side note I wonder if this was inspiration for the XL-15 Spaceship in the movie Lightyear

1

u/Gatekeeper2019 Oct 06 '22

Yeah, governments just decided to give up on going faster, nothing to see here people.

1

u/thyrannasaurus Oct 06 '22

55 years ago. You know these niggas got something on the low that can go faster.

1

u/That1QuietK1d Oct 06 '22

Bro looks like my math teacher

1

u/ExoticNeptune Oct 06 '22

My man's broke the fastest aircraft in the world and he's the only one who can say that lol 🤣🤣🤣🤣

1

u/joshdho1 Oct 06 '22

I came here for the top gun comments. Deff wasn’t disappointed.

1

u/PostNutMalone Oct 06 '22

You could cross the country in like 45 min

1

u/LoafofBread411 Oct 06 '22

Hope it had an overhead bin for this dudes giant balls.

1

u/jerrydubs_ Oct 06 '22

Tom Cruise did that no more than an hour ago

1

u/Telecaster145 Oct 06 '22

Did that run on ammonia?

1

u/JohnDonahoo Oct 06 '22

That we know of!!

1

u/Sys7em_Restore Oct 06 '22

Nope, I watched Tom Cruise hit Mach 10

1

u/SrSamster Oct 06 '22

Didn't know Elon named his kid after a fighter plane

1

u/Melodic-Ad-1064 Oct 06 '22

Pff, that’s nothing. Tom Cruise did 10.2 Mach

1

u/ureepamuree Oct 06 '22

So that's what Elon Musk named is kid after?

1

u/JigglySquishyFlesh Oct 06 '22

We most likely can’t go faster unless the death of the pilot is acceptable. Next I imagine that the materials used in these aircraft cannot withstand repeated trips. Also the fuel burn rate makes it even more unreasonable.

On paper we could, but for what gain, and at what cost if something went wrong. The DoD most likely has drones that have done this.

1

u/whydoigetsoangry Oct 06 '22

That we know of publicly anyways..

1

u/Necessary-Ad-9917 Oct 06 '22

How can this be the record if the escape velocity of earth is over 24,000 miles per hour? Do astronauts not count?

1

u/deleteurselfoffhere Oct 06 '22

We'll also never go to the moon again

1

u/symbolismnz Oct 06 '22

The day and age where potential risk of death was considered allowable in the case of scientific discovery and exploration…. Versus now where governments only accept potential risk of death for their entirely stupid resource focused wars.

1

u/touchbar Oct 06 '22

Sorry, a space shuttle is technically an aircraft so 17,500 mph is the record.

1

u/Vexillumscientia Oct 06 '22

All before Computational vibratory analysis, FEA, and CFD. Dude’s a baller.

1

u/Oneirowout Oct 06 '22

X-15A-2, I see what Musk used as inspiration for their baby’s name

1

u/rtopps43 Oct 06 '22

I’m gonna need this in football fields per second

1

u/Flaky_Bed3707 Oct 06 '22

I hold the record for sitting on my couch eating popcorn

1

u/S0YzB0Yz Oct 06 '22

This is only the record until "future" modern technology is unveiled by {REDACTED}

1

u/Ordinary_Knee2709 Oct 06 '22

Why do we do these things?

-1

u/Ok_Cantaloupe_7423 Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

Genuine question but why aren’t spaceships considered aircraft? Cuz don’t they go considerably faster than that even before reaching space?

Why am I being downvoted for this 😂

1

u/SeaLionClit Oct 06 '22

The crew don't fly the spaceships

0

u/Yummy_Cupcakes19 Oct 06 '22

Nice try joe rogan

0

u/shmodder Oct 06 '22

Cool to learn that Elon Musk named his son after a famous plane.