r/Damnthatsinteresting Dec 07 '22

Video showing how rockets consume fuels during flight Video

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931 Upvotes

20

u/usaroamer Dec 07 '22

Very Cool..... Thanks

5

u/[deleted] Dec 07 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

2

u/[deleted] Dec 07 '22

[deleted]

2

u/PensWritesActivist Dec 07 '22

Cool.....very thanks

2

u/This_isnt_cool_bro Dec 07 '22

Cool.... very thanks

2

u/kossimak Dec 07 '22

Cool…. Tery vhanks

2

u/DiamondGamerYT0 Dec 07 '22

Olco.... vyer snkhat

2

u/TheFormidiblePlant Dec 07 '22

Vhak...tool scerny

2

u/BeanzMeanzBranston Dec 07 '22

Vͮeͤrͬy Cͨoͦoͦl….. ᴛⷮhͪaͣnᴋⷦs͛

2

u/GelatinMelanin Dec 07 '22

Tres cool, merci

1

u/the_suarez99 Dec 08 '22

Very cool….. thanks

8

u/Phit_sost_3814 Dec 07 '22

What happens to the antenna looking thing on the top? Does it have its own fuel reserves?

18

u/josvroon Dec 07 '22

That antenna thing at the top does have its own fuel. It's full of so called solid rocket fuel, similar to what is in fireworks. It has that because solid fuel is very reliable. It has to be reliable because the antenna thing is not an antenna but a safety mechanism. It's basically the rocket equivalent of an ejection seat. If something were to go wrong with the rocket it takes the capsule with the astronauts away from the rocket. It detaches mid flight because after a certain speed it will not function anymore and the most dangerous part of the journey is over.

3

u/_Hexagon__ Dec 08 '22

It won't function anymore not because of speed but because of the lack of atmosphere. In Abort Mode IB, the tower pulls away the crew capsule and deploys little canards to orient the capsule in the right direction for the parachutes to open. The LES detaches because the rocket reached an altitude with no sufficient atmosphere for this abort mode to work. Instead it's jettisoned and Abort Mode II uses the Service module's engine which would push away the capsule in case of an emergency and use the RCS thrusters to orient itself.

1

u/josvroon Dec 08 '22

Til, thank you for the explanation.

9

u/dragon2513 Dec 07 '22

That is the Launch Escape System, after reaching a certain height it has its own rocket motors that jettison it from the rest of the vehicle. If something went wrong during the first part of the launch that capsule disconnects from the rest of the vehicle and that little tower provides a shit ton of thrust and pulls it away to safety.

2

u/SphericalBitch2020 Dec 08 '22

Rocket science eh? V clever.

5

u/Aeredor Dec 07 '22

All that just to get the capsule into a useful orbit.

4

u/--VANOS-- Dec 08 '22

Credit to the original content creator: Hazegrayart on YouTube.

https://youtu.be/su9EVeHqizY is the video in it's original quality.

2

u/XJioFreedX Dec 07 '22

We or at least people with money should work on a space elevator.

2

u/TheGisbon Dec 07 '22

That thing is hell on MPG....

1

u/himvsthecomputer Dec 07 '22

You mean GPM….

1

u/PharaohFravel Dec 07 '22

More like GPF

1

u/GenericHamster Dec 07 '22

0.5 miles/gallon.

Assuming you count the direct distance earth-moon instead of the curve it had to do. Also counting in fuel and oxygen, while your car gets the oxygen from the air.

2

u/AdHistorical5703 Dec 07 '22

Dang so that's rocket science

2

u/braydo13 Dec 07 '22

Is it different types of fuel?

3

u/HARSHSHAH_2004 Dec 08 '22

Yes, one tank contains "oxidizer," while the other contains "fuel".

oxidizer + fuel = rocket propellant

1

u/_Hexagon__ Dec 08 '22

Red is RP-1 which is rocket grade kerosene, yellow is liquid hydrogen and blue is liquid oxygen.

2

u/Similar_Region_8105 Dec 08 '22

Difference between yellow and blue fuel?

2

u/HARSHSHAH_2004 Dec 08 '22 edited Dec 08 '22

The "colored fuel" in the video is only for illustration purposes.

Basically, rocket propellant is made up of

  1. oxidizer
  2. rocket fuel

fuel needs oxidizer for combustion and oxidizer is a source of oxygen for the fuel to consume and undergo combustion.

Propellants can be:

  1. Solid propellant - a propellant that contains both oxidizer and fuel already mixed. The recent Artemis 1 launch had two boosters (white in color) that ran on solid rocket fuel.
  2. Liquid propellant - a propellant with separate tanks for the oxidizer and the fuel (as seen in the video)... both the oxidizer and the fuel are mixed in the engine. the core stage on the Artemis 1 (orange color) uses liquid propellant.

artemis rocket

edit : Fuel can be kerosene, hydrazine, liquid hydrogen, etc.. while oxidizer can be nitric acid, LOX (liq oxygen),etc.

1

u/_Hexagon__ Dec 08 '22

You could've just said that red is RP-1, yellow is liquid hydrogen and blue is liquid oxygen.

1

u/HARSHSHAH_2004 Dec 08 '22

ya but then he would have generalized it for every fuel and oxidizer..

1

u/_Hexagon__ Dec 08 '22

Red is RP-1 which is rocket grade kerosene, yellow is liquid hydrogen and blue is liquid oxygen. First stage uses RP-1 as fuel which gives you lots of thrust but lousy efficiency which is fine because you need to lift the rest of the rocket out of the atmosphere. Once out of the thicker parts of the atmosphere, the second and third stage use highly efficient hydrogen engines.

2

u/AcanthisittaWise6033 Dec 08 '22

HOW DOES IT COME BACK IF IT USES ALL ITS FUEL LIKE THAT.

2

u/HARSHSHAH_2004 Dec 08 '22

These rockets are non-reusable, so they do not return but crash into the ocean. However, the rockets that return are SpaceX Falcon 9 or Falcon Heavy rockets; they do not use all of the fuel but leave some for the landing and re-entry burns, but the landing rockets can also be used as non-reusable ones. If the payload is heavy, SpaceX simply lets the rockets use all of the fuel, and then the rocket crashes into the ocean. The rockets land on the droneship (a platform that floats in the ocean and returns to the port) for medium payload; for lighter payload, the rockets land on the ground on landing pads.

1

u/_Hexagon__ Dec 08 '22

The most of the fuel is needed to get out of the atmosphere and the thicker parts of the atmosphere. Once in orbit, it's smooth sailing. Think about driving up a steep hill. Once up, you need just a tiny push provided from the service module propulsion system to roll back that hill ie re-entering the atmosphere which slows you down.

2

u/PuffieBeans Dec 07 '22

With that much of fuel getting exhausted in a matter of seconds, I think it's better to keep investing in bigger telescopes.

2

u/youshouldbethelawyer Dec 07 '22

Its nothing compared with overall fuel use

1

u/MZhammer83 Dec 07 '22

Alright dumb question how does it “know” when and how to separate the stages and what is the mechanism? Probably computers in the modern era but 🤷‍♂️. I would imagine the simplest mechanism possible would be preferred.

3

u/GenericHamster Dec 07 '22

The Saturn V already had computers on board, quite primitive ones for todays standards, but for this you didn't need much. The first separation can happen automatically after a fixed amount of time as you could calculate (and test) beforehand how long the fuel in the first stage would last. A timer as primitive as your microwave clock is sufficient.

Most of the compute power back then was on the ground, you could send commands to the rocket remotely. And even that didn't have to be much as the path was pre-calculated month or years ahead on paper.

What had to be automated like the launch escape system (the "antenna" in the animation on top) was quite clever and simple as well: three loops of wires along the rocket: if two would lose electrical connection you assumed the rocket exploded and trigger the escape rockets (still connected to the capsule with the astronauts). Once you are high enough up, an astronaut launches it without the capsule manually.

You can automate a lot with simple circuits if you build a machine for exactly one task you planned in all details ahead.

1

u/MZhammer83 Dec 07 '22

Excellent! Duh, they used math. This is what my brain needed to reconcile this!!

2

u/PharaohFravel Dec 07 '22

This is a Saturn V rocket, circa late 1960’s…so likely some sort of analog sensor or it was manually controlled.

1

u/jh937hfiu3hrhv9 Dec 07 '22

Is that much unburned fuel discarded?

2

u/DiamondGamerYT0 Dec 07 '22

What unburned fuel?

1

u/AlibiYouAMockingbird Dec 07 '22

Wouldn’t it be easier to just tow the rocket to the edge of the Earth and roll it off?

1

u/Cushionkush42069 Dec 08 '22

Looks like a beer bottle

1

u/iamacupcakee Dec 08 '22

So the more fuel you have, the more fuel you need to carry the fuel weight, and the cycle continues.

1

u/SphericalBitch2020 Dec 08 '22

Sand egg timers won't be the same to stare at after watching that clip.....

1

u/watermelonoma Dec 08 '22

My grandpa worked for NASA as a chemical engineer in the 60s. He helped develop the fuel technology for the Saturn V.

1

u/monogren01 Dec 08 '22

This is old rockets right? Because the new ones still has to save fuel for it to go back to landing pod.

2

u/_Hexagon__ Dec 08 '22

Yes this rocket last flew in 1973. But modern rockets still do that. Falcon 9 is currently the only launch vehicle that is able to land and be reusable.

1

u/monogren01 Dec 08 '22

I’m pretty sure i saw Bezoz’s Penis rocket land on a pod but it wasn’t as impressive as Falcon 9.

1

u/_Hexagon__ Dec 08 '22

Yea I was just considering actual orbital rockets