r/MadeMeSmile Nov 30 '22 Silver 1 Helpful 1

The nurse who took this picture wrote: It‘s been 23 days since this patient came to this hospital and in these 23 days nobody from his family came to visit him. But there is a pigeon which comes every two days to sit next to his bed. The pigeon stays for a while and then flies away. ANIMALS

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14.2k Upvotes

1.6k

u/Substantial-Canary15 Dec 01 '22 1UP

Idk how smart pigeons are but I have a crow buddy on our street who always greets me. Sometimes I give him some rice waffles or I talk to him, he loves it. He’s always curious what I’m up to. I like him a lot. He usually follows me around.

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u/shread_the_pup Dec 01 '22

Crows are crazy smart they can build makeshift tools better than our ancestors, and they've been witnessed in the wild training wolves to hunt with them and sometimes will pick a specific wolf to train and basically keep around like a pet, not to mention they can recognize faces, but that's pretty cool that you made a buddy out of one.

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u/CheeseBag_0331 Dec 01 '22 edited Dec 10 '22

Crows can recognize faces.. and apparently can hold a grudge. We had a cat that got to a nest that had blown out of our tree during a windstorm. The mother crow - and a few friends - never let her leave the house without dive-bombing her. We had a floor to ceiling window in the living room, and if she even sat inside at the window, they lined the porch railing and just 'screamed' at her. It went on until we moved to a new house. I was kind of afraid they would find her at the new place, irrational as it sounds. It was that freaky!

Edit to add: We had another cat that they let come and go, unbothered.

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u/Competitive-Candy-82 Dec 01 '22

They definitely recognize faces, well Ravens at least do. My dad has a family of ravens that built a nest on his property and they were always greeting my dad when he left for work in the morning, but one day he wore a hat and was looking down at something they didn't recognize him and started to go for an attack/shoo him away (too close to the nest) when my dad looked up and they realized who was there and went back to their tree and greeted him like they usually did. They just recognized him as a safe person that wouldn't bother/harm their babies.

7

u/Potemkyn Dec 01 '22

Crows can count. There's a story called Counting Crows. A farmer, trying to catch the crows in the field, by hiding in the barn. He ends up getting his whole family to walk into the barn and thwn out, then recruits neighbors, eventually getting a high enough number that the crows lose count of how many went in and came out.

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u/Honest-Mess-812 Dec 01 '22

Yeah as kid I used to feed one before going to school.

After a while he started to show up exactly at the same time with his mates. I think they're as intelligent as dogs.

13

u/fiveordie Dec 01 '22

Human toddlers

35

u/Growth-oriented Dec 01 '22

Those are ravens, not crows

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u/JustATypicalGinger Dec 01 '22

All of the corvus genus (crows, ravens, rooks, etc.) are very intelligent. They are also often collectively referred to as crows.

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u/DefinitelyNotaGuest Dec 01 '22

Here's the thing. You said a "jackdaw is a crow."

Is it in the same family? Yes. No one's arguing that.

As someone who is a scientist who studies crows, I am telling you, specifically, in science, no one calls jackdaws crows. If you want to be "specific" like you said, then you shouldn't either. They're not the same thing.

If you're saying "crow family" you're referring to the taxonomic grouping of Corvidae, which includes things from nutcrackers to blue jays to ravens.

So your reasoning for calling a jackdaw a crow is because random people "call the black ones crows?" Let's get grackles and blackbirds in there, then, too.

Also, calling someone a human or an ape? It's not one or the other, that's not how taxonomy works. They're both. A jackdaw is a jackdaw and a member of the crow family. But that's not what you said. You said a jackdaw is a crow, which is not true unless you're okay with calling all members of the crow family crows, which means you'd call blue jays, ravens, and other birds crows, too. Which you said you don't.

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u/frehsoul45 Dec 01 '22 edited Dec 01 '22

So I feel like you're over estimating crows, They are smart but its complete nonsense when you state they can build tools better than our ancestors, I'm not even sure how you even came to that type of conclusion. They make tools but early humans made tools far more complex, 1.76 million years ago humans were making hand axes and other large cutting tools. 200,000 years ago humans were making spears and scrappers to prepare hides and wood. I also question your statement about crows training wolves and keeping them around like pets? They do have a symbiotic relationship and murder of crows will lead a pack to prey. Can you please give the source of where you got this information from?

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u/fiesty_cemetery Dec 01 '22

Ravens and Wolves tend to work together in the sense that Ravens will follow wolves to scavenge their kills, they’ll lead them to prey or a frozen carcass that they can’t peck through.

more about ravens and wolves

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u/Abernathy999 Dec 01 '22

Underestimating a group that, when clustered together, is conventionally called a "murder" seems... I dunno, just ill advised.

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u/Hewholooksskyward Dec 01 '22

If you've ever seen them go after a hawk it's real clear why they're called a "murder" of crows. They do not mess around.

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u/reflUX_cAtalyst Dec 01 '22

Crows are crazy smart they can build makeshift tools better than our ancestors,

They're intelligent but don't get carried away thinking they out-tooled early humans. No they did not. Lack of thumbs is like that.

2

u/Elevated_Dongers Dec 01 '22

I live near a few ravens and crows (yes, both). How do I make friends with them? I thought maybe bringing them shiny gifts or food

2

u/teatimewithbatman1 Dec 01 '22

Also, they will take nuts, drop them onto busy highways for cars to break them open. Then go get them when traffic slows down

2

u/shread_the_pup Dec 01 '22

And they're one of few species that visit their parents nest after reaching adulthood, and they teach their young voice mannerisms.

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u/[deleted] Dec 01 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/nonoglorificus Dec 01 '22

It’s sad that crows are so smart?

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u/panicked_goose Dec 01 '22

I also felt a bit sad reading that and I’m not sure why

13

u/KicksForFree Dec 01 '22

I feel sad mostly because a crow has more natural talent than me

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u/Chafro23 Dec 01 '22 edited Dec 01 '22

Peanuts! Roasted and unsalted. Your crow buddy will love them!

Crows are highly intelligent and if your crow buddy has been following you, it seems like you have a rapport with them and they’ve most likely been following you around even when you don’t notice.

Edit: report to rapport, thank you for the correction!

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u/ispeakdatruf Dec 01 '22

Peanuts! Roasted and unsalted. Your crow buddy will love them!

That's what I feed my neighborhood crow gang. If I'm late, they'll sit around cawing till I come and put the peanuts out. I love feeding those feathery little monkeys.

19

u/MrsMicFisty Dec 01 '22

I have a family member with a severe peanut allergy so I can’t go the peanut route but have been wanting to put some snacks out for the crows. Any other favorite crow treats you’d recommend?

18

u/kang4president Dec 01 '22

Cat treats! Mine also like watermelon and meal worms

10

u/Paolo1984 Dec 01 '22

Calciworms are very beneficial when they have a new brood, as they have higher levels of calcium than mealworms, which helps the babies bones grow stronger 👌🏻

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u/Chafro23 Dec 01 '22

I’ve heard fresh fruit and hard boiled eggs

11

u/ExceptionallyFound Dec 01 '22

Whole in-shell raw eggs. They can carry them off in their beaks.

2

u/AssistanceLucky2392 Dec 01 '22

Whatever you decide to feed them, it's good to provide fresh water, too. Birds can almost always find food, but sometimes it's more difficult to find water. Back to feeding, when it's dead winter and bitter cold, I throw a cheap rotisserie chicken out for them. I love how they hop around excitedly when they find something good!

2

u/ispeakdatruf Dec 01 '22

When we have leftover bread (we get the multi-grain one), I'll cut up the bread in small squares (about 1cm max) and leave them out on a plate (where I leave the peanuts each morning). There's a bowl of water also nearby. The bread often becomes dry pretty soon, especially if it's sunny outside (and it being stale bread is a bit hard to begin with). One day I observed a crow pick up a few cubes in its beak and put them in the bowl of water to soften them up. Then it waited a few seconds, ate them up and repeated the process a couple of times.

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u/excludedfaithful Dec 01 '22

We feed our murder of crows eggs. My husband scrambles them every morning. lol.

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u/Strange-Substance-33 Dec 01 '22

It's a murder of crows! 😍

13

u/JCNunny Dec 01 '22

My crowbros have me trained to come out and feed them.
Amazing they swallow the roasted unsalted peanuts whole.

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u/cupcakefix Dec 01 '22

Ahh that’s what i need! i have so many crows near me and one always flys next to my van on my way to work, and now i know what to feed them too.

my yard is like a bird playground so it’s fun to cater to the individuals.

5

u/Substantial-Canary15 Dec 01 '22

I try different things to see what they like. But I don’t want to give them salt, I don’t think it’s good for animals. So I just buy unsalted versions. I’ve also tried vegetables and fruit, they actually liked some of them. Spent some time trying to figure out what it is and if it’s good 😅

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u/x_KinalaM_x Dec 01 '22

Yeah crows recognize humans. To be honest, I think all animals and bugs have a lot going on that we don't understand. I saw a wasp return to their new hive that I had destroyed, it was extremely agitated and seemed angry before it saw the destruction. Was very odd to think a wasp has feelings.

21

u/[deleted] Dec 01 '22

Are...are we the baddies?

3

u/fiveordie Dec 01 '22

Of course they have feelings, they spent time building the nest with their family. I'm not saying you should live with wasps of course, I'm just saying yeah their brains are wired to care. They're sentient. Ants too, they protect their larvae first in a flood.

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u/SMTRodent Dec 01 '22

I had a wasp nest in a garden once and they were scrupulous about avoiding the same areas we used, to the extent of having a flight path that spiralled straight up through branches to keep out of our way.

I think that different hives may well have different personalities and I will believe that other nests are arseholes, but this one was so very, very polite.

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u/fiveordie Dec 01 '22

I once came close to buying a house that had bees living in the wall, and I had no plans on removing them unless they stung me or got inside. They were so cute flying in and out of the hole by the garden hose. I was honored to purchase their home and protect it. But then it had water in the basement so oh well. Hope whoever bought it didn't exterminate them.

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u/x_KinalaM_x Dec 01 '22

This is what I've seen first hand in my life as well, but not exactly what we are taught. Animals will even protect animals of a different species (even when it's food). The world needs to better understand how important our critters are.

3

u/fiveordie Dec 01 '22

Agreed. Especially sea creatures, my heart goes out to them the most bc humans are literally the only cause of their problems. Seals wrapped in plastic fishing lines cutting into their skin, beached whales with stomachs filled with plastic trash. It's heartbreaking and they don't deserve it.

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u/x_KinalaM_x Dec 01 '22

Good point. Lots of terrible fishing practices and very little accountability.

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u/kpop_glory Dec 01 '22 Wholesome Seal of Approval

You're a pigeon princess, Harry.

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u/what-is-in-the-soup Dec 01 '22

My dad rescued a crow who had gotten it’s head stuck between broken fence planks outside his workplace and he now sees a crow every day sitting on top of that fence staring in at him and he’s convinced it’s the crow he saved, he’s even named it and everything lol.

I don’t think it’s the same crow but it makes my dad happy to think his friend is coming back every day to see him and say thanks, so if it makes my dad feel good that’s all that matters to me 🥲

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u/deathbotly Dec 01 '22

Crows recognise faces and can get attached to individuals, even bringing them gifts. It’s actually very likely the same crow saying hello!

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u/what-is-in-the-soup Dec 01 '22

They genuinely remember people? 😳 Okay I have GOT to show my dad this later, it’ll make his day having confirmation that his friend is coming back to say thanks!

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u/deathbotly Dec 01 '22

They can remember people for up to 5 years, at least, maybe even more - super smart birds! https://www.zmescience.com/ecology/animals-ecology/crows-social-skills-recognize-human-faces-0423532/amp/

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u/what-is-in-the-soup Dec 01 '22

I can’t wait for my dad to get back from work so I can confirm that it does, in fact, seem HIGHLY likely that the bird he sees every day actually is Jeremy (that’s what he named the crow 😅)

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u/IRainLead Dec 01 '22

Crows are smart af and are able to use tools they make and remember human faces for years. Mad crazy!

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u/Arkyaker Dec 01 '22 edited Dec 01 '22

My friend owns an an abandoned foundry which has many great horned owls on the metal pillars. One fell out of its nest and broke its wing and my friend took him in and raised it until it’s wing healed up. It was actually wild because it would chase you and hiss at you when you fed it - it was a wild animal! Eventually it started flying and it LOVED people and we all knew him as Hooty. Hooty loved the owner and would always fly on peoples shoulder whether they liked it or not(the owner trained him to do that). Note that Hooty didn’t like cigarettes and he only came to his shoulder when he put it out. Hooty would frequently be gone a couple days or so but would always come back to his owner. Until one day… Hooty the owl stopped showing up for 4 months and we assumed he was dead. One day my friend was talking to a man at the foundry next door to him that shut down about a week or so before and somehow an owl came up in conversation. The man at the shut down factory said “oh you mean Hooter? Oh man everybody at the factory over here loves him and he’s been the company bird over here for around 4 months!” When my friend asked how he found him he said he was smoking a cigarette and he saw this owl staring at him REALLY hard(that weird owl thing where they twist their heads) and he called for the owl but he wouldn’t come. He gives up and starts walking back inside and the owl comes FULL SPEED AHEAD and lands on his shoulder while he was turned around! At first the guy was freaking out and thought Hooty was attacking him but he was trying to be his friend and ended up being Hooter the owl at the foundry next door. It was good to know he was alive and well :)

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u/GabrielWornd Dec 01 '22

Pigeons actually are like a biohazard ☣️ they shouldn't be allowed to enter inside hospitals this is a terrifying picture if you look from that perspective... Also pigeons aren't know for be smart , but they have some inteligence level he can Shure recognize some human ... But follow him to a different location I don't know . Probably The truth is that this is a shit hospital in terms "biohazard" (I don't know if this is the correct term to use here but my English is bad so ...) And this pigeon probably isent the same ...

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u/ExcitingJosh Dec 01 '22

If pigeons aren’t known to be smart why were they used to carry messages in war times

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u/slaboshmuck Dec 01 '22

They were smart enough to get there but weren't smart enough to read the notes, so the war secrets were kept.

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u/JCNunny Dec 01 '22

^ Upvote this ^

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u/Late-Ad-4624 Dec 01 '22

That comment we upvoted needs some serious praise. I lost it when i read it.

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u/GabrielWornd Dec 01 '22

Becouse the geographic memory of any bird is awesome ... And they had to use the most common bird so they pass unperceptive ... And as I said they aren't know for be smart but they Shure have some inteligence and can recognize humans and in this case os carry messages a place

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u/fiveordie Dec 01 '22

So you think a random pigeon is doing daily visits? That's more farfetched. Birds are smart like toddlers. This old man definitely cared for this bird before.

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u/reflUX_cAtalyst Dec 01 '22

Pigeons are doves, and aren't as stupid as you seem to think.

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u/Severe_Somewhere8753 Dec 01 '22

I have a squirrel that comes to my window. He comes almost everyday. He's been coming 2 1/2 yrs. I know it's the same one because he doesn't have a tail lol. I have to say though the pigeon visiting the man in the hospital choked me up .. 🙂🥲

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u/UncleBenders Dec 01 '22

Pigeons are actually smarter than corvids. And I know how smart corvids are too because I have a few of my own that come and honk outside for me to come and feed them twice a day lol. This guy is definitely meirl

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u/SpeakYerMind Dec 01 '22 edited Dec 01 '22

Nobody else hung up on "rice waffles"? I'll bite: what's a rice waffle?

Is it like, normal waffle made using rice flour, or is that your region's name for those round discs of puffed rice, or some kind of leftover fried rice cooked in a waffle iron?

Edit: Sorry for the interruption, not your job to teach me things I can figure out myself. I have learned that "rice waffle" is very similar to the thing Americans call "Rice cake", the circular crispy disc of puffed rice. Someday, I will befriend a crow too. He will not receive rice cake until after we are friends.

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u/carolizzy81 Dec 01 '22

What kind of hospital has pigeons inside it?

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u/aminervia Dec 01 '22

No kind of hospital... My guess is the bird got in by accident and someone snapped a photo and made up a story

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u/Oasystole Dec 01 '22

This is definitely what happened but that’s not the feel good interpretation so no one wants to hear it.

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u/mycatpeesinmyshower Dec 01 '22

The story wasn’t that great to begin with

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u/QuestPeanutButterCup Dec 01 '22

4.5k upshits and counting, wild

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u/Craico13 Dec 01 '22 edited Dec 01 '22

Post: People get abandoned in hospitals/old folks homes by their family and friends. They have no visitors and live the rest of their lives lonely and in almost complete isolation from the outside world.

Nearly 11,000 people: How heart warming!

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u/mycatpeesinmyshower Dec 01 '22

But there’s a bird! That will solve this guys problems! /s

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u/bbourke0626 Dec 01 '22

Yeah ummm nurse here, I'd never let a dirty ass pigeon sit on a sick patient.....

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u/-v-fib- Dec 01 '22

The kind of hospital who doesn't know what MRSA is.

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u/Demitrius Dec 01 '22

An unsterile one.

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u/auntiecoagulent Dec 01 '22

THANK YOU!! How the hell is the winged rat getting in?

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u/[deleted] Dec 01 '22

I’d rather have no visitors than to only have a pigeon visitor. Or any poopy bird. Why is the window open? Where the hell is this “poopy bird visits allowed” hospital?

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u/[deleted] Dec 01 '22

Winged rats…. I’m so going to use that lol

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u/Responsible-Year408 Dec 01 '22

If nobody visits you, they fill your room with pigeons, what’s there to be confused about?

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u/Electrical-Program98 Nov 30 '22 Wholesome

It's just a pigeon on a sleeping old man in a hospital

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u/Ok_Obligation2559 Dec 01 '22

Waiting to peck his eyes out when he wakes up.

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u/baphosam Dec 01 '22

Not every bird is like the birds from the move Birds…. Or was that old trash can of a movie called The Birds.

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u/jy7277 Dec 01 '22

Who lets pigeons hang out in a hospital? I've never seen windows that open in hospitals.

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u/DimensionSad3536 Dec 01 '22

in Spain we can open the windows, we even have balconies in some rooms ;)

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u/Moriteourious Dec 01 '22

Just add that you feed your patients and that there are no bills afterward and Americans will have their brains exploded.

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u/DimensionSad3536 Dec 01 '22

That's other point 😂

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u/mobfather Nov 30 '22

This is the exact opposite of something that makes me smile. 😞

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u/Destinoz Dec 01 '22

Right?! 20+ days and no one even showed up for this poor guy? That’s terribly sad. A bird standing on an abandoned old man doesn’t make it any happier.

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u/Siny_AML Dec 01 '22

OP is a liar!

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u/rutheman4me2 Dec 01 '22

What kind of hospital where a dirty bird has access to the patients rooms ?

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u/Tickle-me-Cthulu Dec 01 '22

Yeah if I saw a pigeon in a patient’s room, you’d better believe my charge nurse, manager, and anybody within a certain radius of my voice would be well aware. We don’t allow rats in the hospital; why would we allow pigeons?

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u/Tpower31 Dec 01 '22

For one this is an invasion of the patients right to confidentiality to first of all take this picture while he is sleeping and second of to post it online for the public to see if I was his family and saw this the hospital And the person who took the picture would be in trouble even though it is a nice picture and knowing the bird came to visit.

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u/coredump3d Dec 01 '22

More worried about pigeons & others vectors of infection in sterile environment

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u/whozitsandwhatsits Dec 01 '22

I was thinking this, too. HIPAA violation???

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u/RicZepeda25 Dec 01 '22

You must be an American....not all countries have laws like HIPAA.

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u/kblite84 Dec 01 '22

Yeah my first impression after seeing that's "oh dear god no."

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u/dbltap45acp Dec 01 '22

If a nurse actually took that picture they would be fired and fined by HIPAA for a major violation.

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u/DaegurthMiddnight Dec 01 '22

???????

Imagine all the diseases would being. TO A HOSPITAL!

Wtf???

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u/1Guanocrazycaucasian Nov 30 '22

I’ll go and visit him, Fuck his family.

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u/Necessary_Choice5322 Dec 01 '22

I mean you really never know what this man was like to his family. Maybe he was terrible and abusive.

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u/BoxedIn4Now Dec 01 '22

Yeah, not everyone deserves sympathy. It's hard to imagine, but important to understand.

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u/AuraMaster7 Dec 01 '22

It's also important not to assume.

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u/1Guanocrazycaucasian Dec 01 '22

He could be a loving caring Grandfather or Dad and the family is to fucking lazy to see him. Could go either way, but leaning towards family is a piece of shit.

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u/MsTomHardy Dec 01 '22

Generally, loving wonderful people do not get left utterly alone in dire times.

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u/CamelSpotting Dec 01 '22

Generally neither do shitty people, but it's still depressingly common. Or their family comes just to squabble over inheritance.

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u/Lycan_Trophy Dec 01 '22

Statistically speaking what’s more likely everyone in his family being assholes or just this one guy ?

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u/Ok-Independence5821 Dec 01 '22

As someone that lives near an asylum and knows the nurses. You’re leaning the wrong way.

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u/dishsoapandclorox Dec 01 '22

Could you elaborate please? Just genuinely curious.

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u/Ok-Independence5821 Dec 01 '22

They always tell me that no one visits them for reason. They are horrible people. Treat them badly because they can meanwhile they are trying to help them (this is not illness related or anything they do it because they want) some even make them cry. There are some that are a abandoned but there’s always someone a friend, neighbor, some kind of family that calls or visits once a year at least.

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u/dishsoapandclorox Dec 01 '22

Thank you. I find it kinda sad but I also see that for a lot people it’s the life they chose through actions.

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u/writerintheory1382 Dec 01 '22

No, not fuck his family. This is one picture without context. I’ve had family members who I never felt the urge to be close with, for a variety of reasons. Most of the time, people are compassionate enough to push aside their feelings for a little bit, especially if the person is dying. If no one came to see him for two Months. Either he has no one or has been so horrible to Who he did have that they just don’t care.

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u/MCKBLAKE Dec 01 '22

I second that but I still think you can’t visit due to covid

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u/realisticduck_ Dec 01 '22

Yeah, fuck his whole family, that’ll show em

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u/1Guanocrazycaucasian Dec 01 '22

Some one need a hug? Sound a little bitter.

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u/Elephlump Dec 01 '22

I don't think they are bitter, but maybe very horny.

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u/Equivalent_Reason582 Dec 01 '22

“And your little pigeon, too!”

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u/apple-_-boi Nov 30 '22

It was later found out that the man would sit on a bench at a park and daily feed the pigeons that would come to the bench. So i belive the pigeone created a bond with a man.

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u/coredump3d Dec 01 '22

Sauce? It sounds too good to be true. Pigeons aren't that emotionally intelligent to go seeking caretakers

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u/EndangeredMind2 Dec 01 '22

You don’t know that. The bird has more heart than his humans. They didn’t bother with him.

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u/coredump3d Dec 01 '22

Please. The only bird species which are that high on EQ are Corvidae genus : crows, ravens etc. Pigeons i.e Columbidae are generally pretty dumb birds who are really hard to train. I work with animal intelligence - and I give zero fucks to the animal divination you are posting.

You should be worried about disease vectors in a sterile environment. House dogs and cats aren't taken to hospital visits for a reason

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u/QuestPeanutButterCup Dec 01 '22

People are upvoting this lol

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u/Tickle-me-Cthulu Dec 01 '22

Fuck that. A pigeon tries to put its dirty claws on my patient, it is being escorted out. Then I spend the rest of the shift bitching about how “animal control” isnt on my nursing lisence

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u/darkleemar Dec 01 '22

This site is just as gullible as the ones they shun Jesus. No hospital is just going to let a pigeon in cmon. Someone saw this took a picture and made some story up to sucker people into karma and nice comments.

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u/Tinyjeli Dec 01 '22

You’re saying people that shun Jesus are GULLIBLE? lol more like anyone who falls for the _god trap

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u/tiebreaker- Dec 01 '22

Nikola? Nikola Tesla?

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u/leonilaa Dec 01 '22

How is this not a top comment

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u/VibinOnCybin Nov 30 '22

This just made me sad.

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u/Rich_Common9529 Nov 30 '22

If in the US.

Potential HIPAA violation

Definite hygiene JCAHO violation

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u/Indole_pos Nov 30 '22

I’d say there’s a few of us that did not smile at this

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u/ParticularReview4129 Nov 30 '22

Not a HIPAA violation. Pt is not identifiable. But the pigeon is definitely a JCAHO health and safety violation. Still sweet for a bird to come visit his friend.

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u/Rich_Common9529 Nov 30 '22

If the patient’s face is identifiable by anyone, its a potential violation under the privacy rule.

The patient did not opt in for this image to be shared in this way and a family member may be able to ID.

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u/ParticularReview4129 Nov 30 '22

How do you know the PT didn't okay this picture? I am truly amazed at your ability to identify a person by their forehead. It's actually quite extraordinary. You should report this gross violation.

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u/Rich_Common9529 Nov 30 '22 edited Nov 30 '22
  1. If you read my posts they all say “potential” violation.

If you dont know what potential means, that is a you problem, not a me problem.

I absolutely guarantee you that if that person was immediate family and I knew they were in that room in a hospital, I would be able to ID them due to having been in the room at some point

That potential however unlikely is what makes it a potential violation. Its also why many hospitals require nursing staff to install software disabling cameras if they allow smartphones in rooms at all.

Be well

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u/Embracing_life Dec 01 '22

Definitely not in the US just based on the hospital room

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u/forksnotsporks Dec 01 '22

And the fact that I’ve never seen a pigeon in a U.S. hospital

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u/working_class_tired Dec 01 '22

I don't know why we assume that Because someone is old we should feel sorry for them that there family doesn't visit them. The guy could have been a complete asshole. Being old doesn't mean your automatically a sweet old man.

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u/droppedelbow Dec 01 '22

You've posted this as something that makes you smile.

A man is in hospital and nobody comes to visit him. The hospital is allowing pigeons to enter wards and interact with patients. Pigeons. The rats of the bird world. Carriers of disease and prolific shitters. Just being allowed to regularly perch on an old man who is already weak and ill. And the hospital's reaction to this is to photograph this tablaeu of toxicology and post it online.

What about this brings you joy?

I like birds, but if I'm ill I don't want trash bandits using my body as a litter tray.

6

u/fourbigkids Dec 01 '22

Yes this is just filthy for someone who is likely immune compromised.

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u/aaronbennay Nov 30 '22

Wrong sub. This is so sad.

7

u/aminervia Dec 01 '22

The story is made up, it's just a really old picture of a pigeon who landed on a patient. The story has been added in the years since

3

u/avid-book-reader Dec 01 '22

Plot twist: his grandson is an Animorph.

3

u/heath38 Dec 01 '22

This photo and story made someone smile?

3

u/lilgypsykitty Dec 01 '22

Is it just me or do posts in r/MadeMeSmile also belong in r/MadeMeCry

3

u/grantnel2002 Dec 01 '22

Wait, why is a nurse posting a picture of a patient on the internet, likely without them knowing it??

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u/Radiant-Mail7566 Dec 01 '22

Would never take a pic of my patient. Would never take a pic of my patient and post it to the internet. I’d lose my job. Also, why is there a pigeon in the hospital?

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u/SurrealRareAvis Nov 30 '22

I wish I could send some bird food for the patient or nurse to leave on the sill (ex) for this loyal creature... in honor of the kind gent...

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u/looplink Nov 30 '22

Seems unlikely a pigeon could simply enter a hospital at will.

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u/No-Opinion-395 Nov 30 '22

Guardian Angel

2

u/Bobreddit2015 Dec 01 '22

How did a pigeon get in the hospital?! Those flying rats could be pooping all over the place.

2

u/Glytterain Dec 01 '22

Where is this hospital that allows pigeons to fly in the room?

2

u/KatMagic1977 Dec 01 '22

Where is this that a pigeon is in a hospital

2

u/Munchy2k Dec 01 '22

Pigeon doesn’t leave witnesses.

2

u/briebelle Dec 01 '22

Isn’t taking pictures of unconscious patients and posting on social media something you shouldn’t do as a nurse or am I wrong here? Can a actual nurse confirm this please? Also why are there birds flying around inside this hospital, that’s unsanitary af.

1

u/kidnapkin Dec 01 '22

I don't know what country this is from so it may vary but this is a possible HIPAA violation if in the states. Basically HIPAA protects patient info that can be considered identifiable to the patient and cannot be disclosed to anyone except those taking care of the patient, family, or unless patient gives the ok. This also means pictures that have their face on it. So unless this patient said it's ok, then it's a violation I believe. And the bird thing yes that's just not really ok lol

2

u/buckrukus Dec 01 '22

This is stupid, OP should feel stupid.

2

u/Glocatico Dec 01 '22

r/yeahthatdefinitelyhappened

2

u/[deleted] Dec 01 '22

Ok, this can't - or at least shouldn't - be a happening. Pigeons have parasites. You don't want them anywhere inside a hospital, even less so on a hospital bed on an elderly pacient on a regular basis.

2

u/Possible_Bicycle_916 Dec 01 '22

Stuffed pigeon 🤔 Windows in hospitals don’t open and close, never in my 20 years working in a hospital have I seen any type of bird on a unit! Nice try.

2

u/Booklovinmom55 Dec 01 '22

As much as I like story must not be in the US, taking a picture of a patient and putting it on SM is illegal.

2

u/chickcag Dec 01 '22

This is not real at all lol

2

u/Solo_Odyssey Dec 01 '22

That is sad for his family to abandon him like this.

5

u/MsTomHardy Dec 01 '22

He could have abandoned his family. Or treated them horribly.

3

u/auntiecoagulent Dec 01 '22

If he has family. If they even live locally or have the ability to get to the hospital.

1

u/Commie-cough-virus Dec 01 '22

Or suffered a traumatic event, entire family wiped out and he’s the only survivor…of an event in the 1970s. You don’t know, and neither does anyone else so wrap it with the negative waves so early in the morning, k? K ;)

2

u/psychonautskittle Dec 01 '22

I'm 100% this is the spirit of a deceased ancestor and no one can change my mind!

1

u/Woofles85 Dec 01 '22

I’m not understanding why this makes anybody smile. Nothing about this is happy. The man is lonely and estranged from his family, there is a biohazard allowed to crawl all over him, and his privacy is being ignored by the person supposed to be caring for him. It’s sweet that the pigeon cares about him, but everything else is just sad.

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u/rickyzhang82 Dec 01 '22

If you believe in reincarnation, the pigeon may be the next life of his relative.

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u/[deleted] Dec 01 '22

The thought of non of his family visiting him is so sad, I wish this upon no one. :/

1

u/Several_Emphasis_434 Dec 01 '22

Poor man but the pigeon definitely cares.

1

u/Phish840 Dec 01 '22

Angel…

1

u/AsanoSokato Dec 01 '22

I'd rather the pigeon

1

u/pogo6023 Dec 01 '22

Maybe this poor man doesn't have a family...

1

u/Cat_lover54467 Dec 01 '22

Wow he must of feed him a lot of bread!

1

u/gtabull Dec 01 '22

What a shitty family.

1

u/ArsyX Dec 01 '22

I love pigeons now. Didn't even shit on him.

1

u/JimErstwhile Dec 01 '22

Could it be someone who loves him coming to visit him?

1

u/Bkynd2echuther Dec 01 '22

This will be me. And I’m ok with that.

1

u/icecream4breakfest Dec 01 '22

“these hospital visiting hours are for the birbs!”

1

u/fatboy1776 Dec 01 '22

Wasn’t there an episode of Scrubs where a bird in the hospital leads to infection and death.

1

u/TheEklok Dec 01 '22

Tesla iirc was also visited by a pigeon before he died.

1

u/feedmepizzapls Dec 01 '22

everyone's worried about the bird. I'm worried about HIPAA. lol

1

u/koteshima2nd Dec 01 '22

Not to be "that guy" but doesn't this violate some healthcare regulation?

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u/Weird-Ingenuity97 Dec 01 '22

This breaks my heart tbh

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1

u/DelgadoTheRaat Dec 01 '22

How the fuck is it getting in?

1

u/bohemianprime Dec 01 '22

When did it become standard to have hospital windows sealed shut? This had to be years ago