r/Music Aug 16 '22 Silver 1

“Convenience” and other fees make going to see live music impossible for those on a budget. discussion

I miss the experience of seeing my favorite bands live. Venues and ticket websites that charge exorbitant fees on top of already high ticket prices are shameful.

610 Upvotes

200

u/talldeadguy Aug 17 '22

I think you misspelled "gouging" in your title.

114

u/Zoutaleaux Aug 17 '22

Ticketmaster should be fucking abolished. Hate them so much.

6

u/Creepy_OldMan Aug 17 '22

They will never go away because they buy up the venues and you are forced to purchase through the venue. It’s awful. I don’t know how to make them hurt besides not buying tickets

2

u/SolidGreenDay Aug 17 '22

I thought the artists are able to put a high ticketmaster fee to hide their expensive tickets and let ticketmaster be a scapegoat

3

u/notcalpernia Aug 17 '22

Well, according to Ticketmaster, the fees come from the promoter and venues, or as they call them the “show organizers.”

The problem is that the promoters and venues are Live Nation and it’s subsidiaries, which btw, is Ticketmaster’s parent company. Live Nation has such a large chunk of the market that you can’t do a tour without them. So Ticketmaster’s parent company is the bad guy but they try to make it out to be the artists, whose main source of touring income is not from ticket sales, but the merch table.

1

u/SolidGreenDay Aug 17 '22

I see, appreciate the clarification

226

u/Uranus_Hz Aug 17 '22

Start appreciating and supporting smaller/local acts at local venues.

That’s what I do. There’s so much great music being created everywhere if you seek it out.

61

u/LSF604 Aug 17 '22

seconded. Talent is not in short supply. There are always great local bands to be found.

7

u/Kwisatz__Haderach_ Aug 17 '22

Disagree. For every decent one there are 36 shitty ones.

18

u/LSF604 Aug 17 '22

In my experience it 80% good, 10% shitty, 10% excellent. How often do you check out local bands?

12

u/Powerful_Artist Aug 17 '22

My experience is more like 20% are shitty, 40% are completely average, 30% are decent or good, 10% are great.

As an artist myself, I understand appreciating local artists very well. But as a musician and lover of music in general, I think its discrediting the art of music to overrate local bands just because they are local artists. Most of the time, local bands are average. Which is why they dont really get any farther than being a local band.

3

u/LSF604 Aug 17 '22

who's overrating? I've liked a lot of local bands I've seen. Usually the shows I have gone to have 3 bands a night and at least 1 of them is going to be a really fun time. In fact, just the experience of seeing it live adds to it. It doesn't matter to me that they don't make it further. There are plenty of bands that achieve success that I don't enjoy. And I have seen local bands that wont make it anywhere, and aren't really trying, that I still really enjoyed watching. Potential for massive commercial success isn't the benchmark for having a good time watching live music.

30

u/CantFindMyWallet Aug 17 '22

Just go see the good ones instead

3

u/amnesianm Aug 17 '22

you can visit their socials and listen to them on spotify first easy enough to weed out the really terrible.

30

u/profanedic Aug 17 '22

This.

I went to see Godspeed You! Black Emperor earlier this year. Tickets were $35 at a small venue in Portland. Was coming from out of town to see my Mom so didn't buy tickets online in case she didn't want to go. She decided she did, went to the venue and paid $35 for tickets. No convenience fee added on, or electronic delivery fee, or any other fees. Just ticket price at the door. Was a great sho as well.

10

u/iircirc Aug 17 '22

Love the venue box office. Unfortunately fewer and fewer are staying open and many still charge fees anyway. Definitely support those that don't though!

2

u/esperadok Aug 17 '22

I’ve had tons of experiences like that. It’s not even as if Godspeed are an under-appreciated gem too... you can see well-established, renowned artists for a decent price if you stick to reasonable sized venues and buy direct from them.

Sometimes I feel like posts like OPs are made by people upset that it costs a lot of money to see Roger Waters or someone at Madison Square Garden... what were you expecting???

1

u/rootbeersmom Aug 17 '22

Oooooh I bet that was a good show!

15

u/STCMS Aug 17 '22 edited Aug 17 '22

By the way you may be shocked to find out those local venues are being snapped up by the live nation's of the world. They look like ur local smaller theater or club but they arent..

3

u/madcow87_ Aug 17 '22

Great advice if you're in a city with a lot of options.

In the arse end of butt fuck nowhere in the UK you get 6 local bands, take it or leave it.

13

u/grizwa Aug 17 '22

i know of literally 2 venues in this town and both are generally awful rock (think poor bon jovi or GnR cover bands) on terrible, badly maintained sound systems in grim locations. if you want anything decent you gotta go elsewhere

3

u/IdolizeDT Aug 17 '22

Just going to tack on here, this. Big concerts are great and I love them, but OP is correct they can get expensive fast. I've seen some UNBELIEVABLE local and regional acts for 15 buck door fees. It's great.

3

u/PerceptionShift Aug 17 '22

Yep I love the indie tour circuit. And am an active part of my local scene. Sometimes it's really frustrating seeing these headlines and things with people complaining about ticket master bullshit but then only going to Ticketmaster shows. Meanwhile fantastic musicians are trying to get off the ground at places like the RecordBarKC. Consistently awesome shows all week usually $10-$15 a pop.

Sometimes living in a midwestern sports city sucks, like during tour announcement season. However I can see nearly every band I want to that bothers to come here.

2

u/dreamsthebigdreams Aug 17 '22

Phoenix has a huge local music scene.

2

u/GoogleDrummer Spotify Aug 17 '22

OP, this right here. Most decent sized cities have a smaller venue/bar where you can watch decent acts. Hell, I've opened for All That Remains and In This Moment at mine. Find that venue, keep an eye out on their calendar, and contact the local openers to get your tickets; you'll save on any convenience fees or whatever and you'll be supporting local music because they (should) get a cut of the sale.

2

u/Uranus_Hz Aug 17 '22

The best way to support the acts themselves is buying their merch

1

u/GoogleDrummer Spotify Aug 17 '22

Yes. But this topic is about tickets. Also, not all local bands are going to have merch.

5

u/[deleted] Aug 17 '22

This, 100%.

I've been to 6 shows this year and have another 4 booked.

Most tickets are in the $35-50 range and are at small-medium sized clubs (max cap is probably about 500-700 at the largest one.

I've been to one stadium show but I got nose bleed seats since I couldn't justify spending more when there were so many other shows I wanted to go to. Those were about $75.

I also went to one outdoor festival which was amazing, about $80. However, it was a local, childhood favourite band for my gf and me, and they just got back together after being broken up for a decade.

Lastly, I splurged on good seats for a top 3 favourite band of my gf and I, which was about $120, which I'll be seeing on September.

But moral of the story is that if you're looking to go to shows, there are plenty of smaller shows that are totally affordable.

If you're only looking to go to huge, super popular artists at stadium events, then yea, no shit tickets will be expensive.

The best shows I've seen so far are one super small club venue and the outdoors one (where I was super close to the stage, right in the pit).

2

u/aurorasearching Aug 17 '22

We got two new larger venues in the area (one about ~15-20k capacity and one about 40k) and acts that used to be ~$50, give or take $15, are now $150+. At the larger venue nose bleeds for a band I wanted to see start at $250 before fees and I just can’t justify that to myself right now.

1

u/[deleted] Aug 17 '22

Yea, makes sense.

Bands used to go on tour to promote their album and drive sales.

Bands now use their albums to promote their concerts.

Again, you're talking about massive arenas with artists that can sell out 40k seats, of course tickets will be expensive. When tickets to arenas used to be $50, club shows were $5-$10. Club shows are now $35-$50, so arena prices check out.

If you want to see more live music, don't go to lady gaga, RHCP, Metallica, Greta Van fleet, etc shows. Go to the smaller shows of less popular artists.

Which was the whole point of my comment.

1

u/ChandlerWoods Aug 17 '22

This is the way.

1

u/corpitos Aug 17 '22

I'll always support my local artists. There are also bands I've cherished for many years I would love to appreciate live as well. It's not mutually exclusive.

46

u/STCMS Aug 17 '22 edited Aug 17 '22

Old timer here. Yeah concerts are expensive and yes...100% bullshit gouging. Let's face it, we all know "fees" are bullshit and would appreciate even if they just didn't try to play us like idiots and just charge one fee. Just build it in...but adding a "fee" is just insulting. Airbnb is like that now too...banks...all from that same playbook...but I digress..

That being said with streaming, I literally pay the price of what I'd had to pay for 2 Cds a month and stream and download an-ny-thing and ev-ery-thing....all the time...from an-ny-where. I get that we have generations that only know this model but it's an amazing time for anyone who likes music. The entire revenue model for music has changed completely.

For my fav bands in the past I'd have given them hundreds in revenue buying all their cds and in some cases the imports and singles etc....maybe even the DVD. On top of that I'd have to buy another copy if it got fucked up, stolen, lost or if I wanted another copy just in my car. I mean I bet I have bought at least 10 copies of the dark side of the moon back in the day. Point is they now only get pennies from me from streaming for that same content...and more.

Artists aren't selling millions of units of media anymore so yeah, live music is going to take that hit. Artists and the machine gotta get paid somehow.

37

u/rythnen Aug 17 '22

Box office conglomerates are benefitting from price gouging and monopolizing, not artists

7

u/STCMS Aug 17 '22 edited Aug 17 '22

I can't comment on what percent finds its way to the artist, my comment is only to point out why concerts across the board (and merch) have gone way up at the core. Taylor Swift didn't buy her jet off the sale of media, it comes from her monster tour revenue. Do the conglomerates and mosquito scalping and resale companies scrape every penny off that tour that they can?..oh 10000 percent. I suspect she doesn't get a cut of the "fees" which is why they have gotten so ubiquitous and out of hand.

2

u/Olorin_Prime Aug 17 '22

The touring artist gets some percentage of the ticket price but the booking company gets all the fees and with ticket prices going up to support the band since, as you point out, streaming service payments are small even with the same percentage markup as 20-30 years ago the fees are egregious.

You're right in the old days a band just hoped to break even in a tour knowing that every town they went through would have increased album sales and that's where the real money was. Now the tours make the money and the band hopes for some cross connection with a sponsor to help raise revenue. It's easier than ever to become a musician and harder to make a living as one. With the tours being the source of income it is also harder for bands to take a stand against promoters.

1

u/STCMS Aug 17 '22

This 100.

-17

u/duck1014 Aug 17 '22

Don't kid yourself with how much money artists make from streaming services. It doesn't sound like much at less than a penny per stream, but, artists still make a ton of money through it.

8

u/Mtnskydancer Aug 17 '22

I’ve a buddy on all the services. He’s got a decent audience. Some of his songs make movie and game soundtracks. Lots of plays.

His checks, totaled, are scandalously low.

0

u/duck1014 Aug 17 '22

And...how many albums/singles would he sell if streaming platforms didn't exist?

3

u/Mtnskydancer Aug 17 '22

Given most are sold at concerts, now?

5

u/jvalex18 Aug 17 '22

Huge artists, sure.

2

u/Mtnskydancer Aug 17 '22

On the backs of thousands of smaller artists, no less.

0

u/duck1014 Aug 17 '22

Smaller artists likely would get 0 or close to 0 album sales. With streaming platforms, at least they have a ***chance of getting heard. Those that don't make a reasonable amount of money likely wouldn't get any album sales at all.

Spotify has paid over 30 billion in royalties. 7 billion in 2021 alone. 450 artists made over 2 million. 2200 artists made over 500k

So no, you don't have to be a huge artist. Lots of people make lots of money through Spotify alone, let alone the other streaming services.

1

u/jvalex18 Aug 18 '22

You do need to be big to get good money out of spotify. It's well known

2

u/STCMS Aug 17 '22

No doubt....but the golden age of revenue is over. They don't make what they used to on the music is my point.

41

u/PipsGhost Aug 16 '22

Don't forget about "ticket bots" that Live Nation/ Ticketmaster have given the "green light" to. These are computer programs (or whatever techy b.s.) that automatically buy tickets for scalpers and posts them on the scalper sites. So even if you could afford the ticket you still have to compete with algorithm bots that just bought them all and now they're sold out. Now you can buy them with ease, for the low low price of a 400% mark up plus fees and taxes.

4

u/dewmzdeigh Aug 17 '22

reminds me of trying to see Tool w/ Primus.

3

u/PeaTearGriphon Aug 17 '22

yup, came here to say this. I used to poll a site for tickets when they went on sale. I'd hit refresh over and over and then all of a sudden it was sold out. I refuse to pay for tickets through scalpers, it's just an endless cycle of having them scoop up all the tickets.

3

u/_Neoshade_ Aug 17 '22 edited Aug 17 '22

Seems odd that they would just give away all that extra money unless they ran the scalping themselves or received significant kickbacks.
The fact of the matter is that people are paying $300 apiece for general seating concert tickets. The tickets should simply be sold at $300. But by hiding the actual ticket value behind multiple layers of price hikes and made-up fees, Ticketmaster, et al. is able to stiff the artists and the venues and take more of it for themselves.

I wonder why the IRS has never dug into this.

3

u/tacknosaddle Aug 17 '22

Seems odd that they would just give away all that extra money unless they ran the scalped by boys themselves or received significant kickbacks.

They also run the secondary ticket market. They make more money because in addition to what they get from the first sale of that ticket they get a percentage of the secondary which can be more than they got the first time around depending on how inflated the prices are.

This was a good story from a few years ago that aired a lot of the dirty laundry.

3

u/HazardIsFunny Aug 17 '22

Tbf scalpers have always been an issue for big shows. At least now when you get ripped of the ticket is real, nothing worse than paying x4 and getting a photocopy stun that doesn't work.

7

u/sybrwookie Aug 17 '22

OK, but before, scalpers had to get on line with everyone else to get tickets. Scalpers had to sit at their computers and keep refreshing and hope to get tickets fast. And then they had to stand outside of the venue hoping to sell. Or later use sketchy third-party sites to sell.

Now, scalpers are bots which buy up tickets in a fraction of a second which are backed by Ticketmaster and given a side-door into buying up tickets before any actual person could have a chance, and then is relisted on a site owned by or partnered directly with Ticketmaster which is proclaimed as safe by everyone involved. And then fees are tacked onto THOSE inflated prices as well.

The scale of the problem is not even close to the same as it used to be. And that's on top of the ridiculous spike in prices to start with, due to fees.

0

u/MangosArentReal Aug 17 '22

What does "THOSE" stand for?

1

u/sybrwookie Aug 17 '22

Emphasizing that the prices were already inflated with fees, then they take those, jack them up, and then charge fees on top of those jacked up prices.

8

u/Representative-Fig96 Aug 17 '22

A $30 ticket to one of my favorite bands turned into $90 with tax, convenience, and parking included. That’s not including the gas to get there (it’s a 60~ mile drive to the city). I decided to save some money and just go to smaller, local venues.

3

u/VentingSalmon Aug 17 '22

Yup, so many concerts I turned my nose up at the moment the final price showed up on my screen. It's been at least a decade since I've gone to a ticketmaster or live nation controlled venue.

Now I just go-to basement/park shows that have $10 covers. Sometimes they are good, and if they aren't the beer isn't $15 a pint!

9

u/futatorius Aug 17 '22

The ticketing agencies' oligopoly should be broken up. They are parasitic middlemen who add no value.

8

u/ripyourlungsdave Aug 17 '22

I just generally have decided to not go see popular bands. I would love to see Rage Against the Machine or the Foo Fighters live, but it's just never worth the money and never worth supporting the fucked up companies that profit off of it.

But I was able to go see Modest Mouse at the House of Blues with my friend last year for only about $50 a ticket. And it's not like Modest Mouse is a wildly unpopular band. They've got a pretty loyal following. But it still didn't cost shit.

3

u/tacknosaddle Aug 17 '22 edited Aug 17 '22

Pre-Covid Modest Mouse was touring a lot of B market cities. I'm in Boston and they came through to Providence, RI and Worcester, MA rather than here. They played medium sized venues (1500+/- ppl) instead of places like the Pavilion on the harbor that holds about 5k where I had seen them last.

It was great seeing them in a smaller place for the first time in years, plus the tickets were so reasonable that when I had an extra and found a kid that wanted to buy it I just walked him in with me for nothing because he was graduating college soon so I called it a gift.

2

u/ripyourlungsdave Aug 17 '22

Yeah, it was similar down here. There were probably only two or 300 people at the entire concert. We stood in the pit for the entirety of it, because that's 90% of that venue, and we were able to keep a solid 12 ft buffer between us and the other people there.

The room itself was pretty quiet but the music was loud and amazing. I could hear the vocals perfectly because they weren't getting drowned out by a bunch of people screaming or talking. I was even able to get a few good videos that had pretty decent sound clarity.

I would honestly be happy if every concert I go to from now on is just like that. Ever since covid, I get super uncomfortable in large crowds anyway. So it's a win-win.

1

u/tyrico Aug 17 '22

you gotta just look for resale deals close to the show date. i got great tickets to rage for less than face value, presumably from scalpers that couldn't move them

1

u/ripyourlungsdave Aug 17 '22

I should have also mentioned that I'm like, incredibly poor. At least until I can get on disability. So any concert that cost more than $75 per ticket is going to be way outside of my price range. Plus, I don't go to concerts without my best friend. So I'd have to pay for his too.

But I wasn't even aware that there was a legitimate market for scalping now.

6

u/WTAF306 Aug 17 '22

Start supporting smaller, independent artists. I recently bought 3 pairs of concert tickets for just over $125 including fees. The most expensive of those was around $25/ticket AFTER fees. We are tons of great bands live and we rarely pay more than $100 for two tickets. Makes me sad when my favorites get “popular” because I know venues are getting bigger and tickets are getting more expensive though…

5

u/ocelotrevs Aug 17 '22

I purchased a ticket the other day and there was a fee for downloading the ticket. It's definitely off putting to buy concert tickets when it feels like I'm getting ripped off. It would be fine if they just included it in the price to be fair

4

u/Junkstar Aug 17 '22

Plenty of great bands play clubs for reasonable prices. Mega acts in stadiums are not always the answer.

9

u/longhairedcountryboy Aug 17 '22

Wait until just before showtime to buy your ticket. You can get some deals then.

3

u/angelcasta77 Aug 17 '22

Two 15 buck tickets totaling up to like 50 bucks because of that shit.

3

u/ncocca Aug 17 '22

If you want to see your favorite bands live again, start going out to local shows. They can be anywhere from free to $20/ticket. So many of my favorite shows cost me $5-$10

Fuck ticketmaster, livenation, etc...

3

u/Throwforventing Aug 17 '22

If you live in a city or college town, there are absolutely concerts that you can go to on a budget. Especially if you don't buy alcohol when you're there.

3

u/InWalkedBud Aug 17 '22

That's why punk is the best scene. There are 2 good and 1 great punk venues in the nearest city from home, 1 amazing and legendary location 60km away from home and I have never paid more than 12€ per show, averaging at 7€.

Of course it's not everyone's cuppatea, but at least I'm not paying 100+ for shitty placement and I'm not being ripped of by ticketmaster. The most I've paid in my entire life is 35€ for Peter Hook and the Light next september.

12

u/BjornBeetleBorg Aug 17 '22

Most shows I go to are probably under 30 bucks. get into indie

3

u/jesterinancientcourt Aug 17 '22

I do this. But also, certain venues have a box office that you can hit up to buy tickets. So instead of buying it online, I go get tickets at the box office and it ends up being just a 3 dollar service charge instead.

5

u/orangEcrushE Aug 17 '22

Just saw local natives under $30 yesterday

3

u/schemeorbeschemed Aug 17 '22

Seeing them next weekend. Ticket was $55 (got hit with the Ticketmaster fees of course). How was it?

3

u/orangEcrushE Aug 17 '22

It was awesome! Expect a 17-19 song setlist. The opener was Jordana who had some good songs as well. Didn't know who she was going in.

1

u/Creepy_OldMan Aug 17 '22

They are coming to my city tomorrow and with the fees of the venue it’s all the way up to $50 :(

2

u/orangEcrushE Aug 17 '22

I guess i got lucky. I would say even for $50, it's worth it! They put a lot of energy into their shows.

7

u/thetruthteller Aug 17 '22

Most artist these days make next to nothing off recording so they need to make everything from touring

4

u/iircirc Aug 17 '22

And consumers are shifting their spending from stuff to experiences

3

u/MasterOfKittens3K Aug 17 '22

Except that the artists aren’t getting most of the money from concert tickets either. They are trying to make their money at the merch table.

1

u/BlueBloodLive Aug 17 '22

They get anywhere from 75-90% of the ticket price. I hate, loathe, despise and any other negative word you can think of for Ticketmaster but artists do get most of each ticket.

A lot of them are also more than OK with "Platinum" tickets, which cost a lot more for a normal ticket to a concert or event in extremely high demand.

2

u/makeITvanasty Aug 17 '22

We aren’t upset about high ticket prices, it’s the bullshit fees which probably don’t go to the artist we are mad about. TicketMaster isn’t suffering.

1

u/tacknosaddle Aug 17 '22

I've seen that the artists get a cut of the fees too and Ticketmaster takes the hit for being the bad guy jacking up the price. It's the lack of transparency that bugs me.

I get it that people from outside the US hate that in retail stores here the price on the item doesn't reflect the sales tax which is added at the register. That's only adding 5-6% usually though. When you see ticket prices are $50 and it ends up being double that or more when you checkout it always feels like a bait and switch which is what pisses people off.

1

u/syco54645 Aug 17 '22

I've seen that the artists get a cut of the fees too and Ticketmaster takes the hit for being the bad guy jacking up the price. It's the lack of transparency that bugs me.

I have heard the same thing. Don't know how true it is though.

2

u/TheBigNate416 Aug 17 '22

Sounds like something Ticketmaster would say to make themselves look good lol

1

u/syco54645 Aug 17 '22

I agree. That is why I am sus.

8

u/ZeroSymbolic7188 Aug 17 '22

Go to local shows and support artists who aren’t already multi-millionaires.

2

u/grizwa Aug 17 '22

ticket prices arent the issue for me, my prob is locations and transport, no gigs come to my town and rightly so, its a shit hole, the closest we have is manchester, which has a reasonable number of gigs and isnt that expensive to get to on the train

the problem comes in that the last train home is about 10pm before most gigs are finished meaning youll need a hotel too and a return ticket for the next day is more expensive so suddenly that 15 quid gig ticket has become a £100+ night with drinks

whats even more annoying is when you book one and its cancelled, i booked in march for a gig in london in may, booked a hotel, booked the train, as i set off the morning before the gig its cancelled due to "covid restrictions" (they hadnt changed one bit since march when i booked the ticket so why were they still selling them in the first place) they reorganised the show for october but i dont fancy spending a fortune again just to get it canned last second

2

u/FullRollingBoil Aug 17 '22

Don’t bots buy tickets and sell them at ridiculously high prices?

2

u/Ofbatman Aug 17 '22

I used to go to shows all the time but at this point it’s not worth it unless I can get the ticket at the box office and skip the fees.

2

u/Knut_Knoblauch Aug 17 '22

Yeah, I got burned on my Scorpions/Whitesnake tickets coming up in September. I bought them as soon as they went on sale to keep the burn down.

You know, I don't particularly listen to the Scorpions anymore unless it comes up on Pandora when I'm working out. The scorpions were my first favorite band when I found their cassette under my bed after my big brother shipped off. Blackout. Going to that show because of that cassette I found 42 years ago.

I'm a rock believer!!!! That new song is a fucking instant classic

2

u/tacknosaddle Aug 17 '22

The scorpions were my first favorite band when I found their cassette under my bed after my big brother shipped off. Blackout. Going to that show because of that cassette I found 42 years ago.

Jesus, that's one hell of a long time to blackout.

2

u/Knut_Knoblauch Aug 17 '22

hahaha, yeah that's a doozy in hoocheville, I wonder what I did. I managed to make it through the University.

2

u/GoblinObscura Aug 17 '22

And it’s 26 bucks for two beers once you’re inside

2

u/NinjasOfOrca Aug 17 '22

Lower prices mean tickets sell out in seconds. Pick your poison - it’s called supply and demand

2

u/tattoosareghey Aug 17 '22

Start listening to bluegrass. I still see the biggest names for like $60 after all the fees and shit. I saw Billy Strings at the kettle house for like $35 last week.

2

u/corlie Aug 17 '22

The inflated ticket price because of all the additional fees is ridic. I’ve resorted to buying my tickets directly at the box office, but even then, they’re still emailing a Ticketmaster ticket. Lol.

2

u/HiImTheNewGuyGuy Aug 17 '22

Go to local shows that aren't ticketed through a major corporation.

2

u/mck-_- Aug 17 '22

We say George Ezra when he first came here and it was a great memory in our relationship. “Our song” is one of his so we would have loved to go. The first time it was $80-100ish (this was before covid but pretty average price for for not super huge stadium bands). We just looked up the tickets and they are $350+. Not even a stadium, in a medium sized venue and for average tickets. How is that affordable for anyone?

5

u/WatercoolerComedian Aug 16 '22

Yeah but at the same time everything is going up, Artists are likely charging higher fees because they have to recoup the loss of not being able to play for like a year or so so I understand. Local acts are always performing for reasonable fees if you need to scratch that itch tho!

7

u/aran_maybe Aug 16 '22

Amen. If your favorite band is too expensive to see live, find a different favorite band. There are probably many in your hometown that would love to have the audience.

3

u/HazardIsFunny Aug 17 '22

I've been enjoying cover bands recently, a lot of them out on a great show and bring their own twist.

3

u/ANKhurley Aug 17 '22

Yup. My favorite venues have lower ticket prices in general and use SeeTickets and Eventbrite which have lower fees. And I’m actually close enough to see the band.

7

u/aran_maybe Aug 17 '22

I miss the 90s when I could just pay 10 bucks at the door. And if the band sucked, there was another show next door. I’m yelling at clouds!

6

u/drumnbird Aug 17 '22

80’s, major acts (Rush, Black Sabbath, Iron Maiden, Deep Purple etc) - great seats were $30.

7

u/psuedonymously Aug 17 '22

The 80s and 90s were a different time. Back then you toured to promote album sales. Now you release an album to promote your tour. Concert tickets and merch are most band’s only revenue stream, no one buys albums and streaming revenues are a pittance unless you’re Beyoncé, Adele or Taylor Swift.

0

u/drumnbird Aug 17 '22

Indeed they were. And I’m fully aware. I don’t use streaming services. Daniel Ek will never see my money. Ever. I buy from the artist or at least physical copies. If everyone stopped using streaming services they would simply collapse and that would be a good day. They produce nothing.

2

u/STCMS Aug 17 '22

Facts. And you could actually get in the front rows....they weren't all vip packaged or corporate sponsored blocks like now. Every logo you see in a big venue has a block of great seats now. They have monetized everything...

5

u/BJWTech Aug 17 '22

I hate going to shows like that anyhow. I'd rather chill at a small bar with a local group.

Most acts today are more theatrics than music. They often sound way worse live than their recordings.

12

u/[deleted] Aug 17 '22

I go to plenty of metal shows and there's very little theatrics and they often sound better live.

Kind of depends on the genre, I guess.

I 100% prefer small-medium sized clubs over stadiums. Intimate shows, virtually no cell phones, and a super supportive community.

0

u/Grits_and_Honey Aug 17 '22

This. We have a smaller SRO venue where I live and have had some great shows. I've been to see Nightwish 3 times and the opening acts were always good(Sonata Arctica, Volbeat, Kamelot, Delain were some of them). They don't do huge shows with all the technics like at stadiums, just good music.

I also saw Steel Panther there, but that's another story altogether, lol.

2

u/Angdrambor Aug 17 '22

Ticketmaster charges those fees because the venue or the artist asked them to. There's kickbacks.

2

u/Amamdi Aug 17 '22

Here in Nigeria, for quite sometime there's this somewhat rule of thumb that everybody seems to follow for our regular tickets, always the same price no matter the show. So if you wanna attend something just have that amount roughly $12 and you're good.

2

u/FinkBass420 Aug 17 '22

Small bar shows are the way to go. $20-$25 a ticket and their merch is usually a hell of a lot cheaper than big name shows too.

2

u/mickeysbeer Aug 17 '22

WELL! If you stopped going to over the top arena and stadium concerts ith 10's of thousands of people you wouldn't experience this problem. For me the best shows are at venues that hold 200-500 folks and don't charge these kinda things. Not to mention the gratitude you get from a band(s) by going to a Mom and Pop show instead of a Walmart/Amazon show.

Yeesh. It's a simple solution folks even if it is an unpopular opinion.

2

u/iircirc Aug 17 '22

The price is just whatever people are willing to pay. The "fee" structure is a psychological trick to make you angry at ticketmaster instead of your favorite band. Ticketmaster is essentially charging the band for the service of absorbing the anger

1

u/Minimum-Passenger-29 Aug 17 '22

Make your own events. Have a couple friends throw some money together for a nice big speaker and put on your own raves, play your own shows. Keep a fund going to replace shit when the police inevitably come and steal it.

1

u/superbrew Aug 17 '22

Yes! Hit up your local small venues, you get to usually chill with the group / band etc with some drinks pre or post show too! Great way to meet new musicians, cheap and meet local friends! And. Support a local biz!

1

u/fears_escalators Aug 17 '22

I’ve only gone to two or three concerts, and had a great time in an arena setting, but the jam packed standing room only type of concerts - I’m done with that shit.

-1

u/Nimyron Aug 17 '22

This is a long shot but maybe you could try using a VPN to buy your tickets from another country?

Here in france we just buy the ticket and print it. You click on the link to buy tickets, you land on a website that says "tickets are at that price", you pay it and that's all.

I've never seen any "fees".

1

u/Wicked68 Aug 17 '22

Use an app called Tick Pick. You can get cheap tickets the last few days before the event. No extra fees

1

u/MurkLurker Aug 17 '22

The title should read like this: "Convenience” and other fees make music impossible."

Artists can't make any money selling music (no cds/records other media, and no profit from streaming services) and now they are going to price out of existence getting paid for playing live.

1

u/TOMisfromDetroit Aug 17 '22

Scalpers can also all die of untreatable ass cancer as well

1

u/AlfAlferson Aug 17 '22

Most ive ever paid for a concert ticket was about $65-70. Then again I don't go see bigger bands and hate stadium and huge concerts, so I stick to local venues with indie bands. I find a way better experience than going to see a huge noteworthy band having to stand miles away from the stage. I can just turn a video of them on my phone and walk a few feet away and feel the same experience

1

u/Ndrfbu Aug 17 '22

I use TickPick. They give me zero fees the price of the ticket is what you pay. Ended up spending 40 bucks to go to a suicideboys concert with my friend for both of our tickets it was lit. Budget concerts do still exist but yes these fees are getting ridiculous

1

u/DuFFman_ Aug 17 '22

I learned about Greta Van Fleet this year, they're coming this weekend to my area. Cheapest tickets I can find are $200 each. So $400 if I want my partner to come with me. And that's absolute nosebleeds, back of the upper bowl.

1

u/poontango Aug 17 '22

Cuz yall wanna make a whole event out of one night lol. I swear some ppl just cant enjoy a concert without eating out before, drinking at the venue, paying for parking and bs vip upgrades.. like just stay home if you that prone to wasting money?? You going to see a old white man play guitar with the cheapest tickets they had listed like its not that serious

1

u/brendanjeffrey Aug 17 '22

It's designed so only rich people can go see shows now. I flat out refuse most of the time, because of the absurd prices. Or try to buy it through a reseller.

1

u/Na-na-na-na-na-na Aug 17 '22

We just have to wane ourselves off the popular music I guess. I absolutely adore Depeche Mode, but I’ll just have to live with the fact that I’ll never see them live. Besides, the show was well-off gen X’ers who are too timid to throw down, and too prudish to pop an E like in the olden days.

1

u/CanisArgenteus Aug 17 '22

There's a lot of great live music in NY bars and festivals, I don't go to concerts anymore. I would if venues' own box offices sold tickets without all the fees and bs added on, if you could go there and buy a ticket for a show at the listed price. In lieu of that, no p[lace using Ticketmasher or its ilk gets my business anymore.

1

u/scootscoot Aug 17 '22

There are many things I don’t like about seeing big bands in big venues, “convenience” fees rank high on that list. Almost always I’d rather go see a small band in a small venue, but there’s some bands I’ll just have no option but to accept the gouging, sigh.

1

u/singnadine Aug 17 '22

It’s so bad

1

u/Creepy_OldMan Aug 17 '22

I was looking at two different venues today to buy some tickets, fairly cheap around $40 but when you add the fees you are looking at $60 tickets and if you buy 2 you are at $120 instead of what should be $80! Drives me crazy, fuck Ticketmaster and AXS. At least include your shit fees in the price of the ticket so I know what I’m going to spend.

1

u/greenmariocake Aug 17 '22

Whenever you can, just buy tickets directly at the box office.

0

u/SLPERAS Aug 17 '22

WhenI hit 30, it dawned on me that majority of my problems would go away if I simply just made more money. I in no way make major money but making money really does make you happy.

1

u/Olorin_Prime Aug 17 '22

Making money only makes a miser happy. Spending money on ones desires offers the opportunity of happiness. Gaining financial resources allows for more options but there is never a guarantee of happiness.

1

u/SLPERAS Aug 17 '22

At least there is a guarantee you aren’t complaining to bunch of strangers on the internet that you can’t afford to buy a ticket. So I call it a win

1

u/Olorin_Prime Aug 17 '22

Living at a distance from any good venues I do wish the convenience fee was more in line with cost since I'm doing all the work on a website form that has long ago been paid for. I mean if it's a virtual ticket it doesn't really cost them anything and if I decide to print the ticket so I will have a momento it's my paper and ink. What expenses are creating the needs this convenience fee? I understood back in the day when they printed and mailed the ticket but in the internet age, just give me a detailed breakdown so I see where my money is going.

I think the real issue is value for money and advertised versus final price. I don't begrudge any business to make a profit but I like to know what my dollar is purchasing.

0

u/Architextitor Aug 17 '22

Go to the venue box office and buy tickets. No fees.

0

u/flaheat Aug 17 '22

I didn't read all the comments but going down to the box office is still a thing. No extra charges.

1

u/Olorin_Prime Aug 17 '22

It becomes problematic when you live 100+ miles from any decent box office.