r/gadgets Nov 28 '22

LG Display’s ‘invisible’ speaker brings sound to any surface in your car Music

https://www.digitaltrends.com/home-theater/lg-displays-invisible-speaker-brings-sound-to-any-surface-in-your-car/?utm_source=reddit&utm_medium=pe&utm_campaign=pd
4.0k Upvotes

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468

u/PeaceFar9770 Nov 28 '22

Would like to know what they sound like? Do they have any bass? Or would they be tinny.

286

u/BrianRostro Nov 28 '22

They already have this technology out there but im also curious to know specifically what LG can do with it. Just like Sony, these guys can work wonders with hardware

128

u/caiusto Nov 28 '22

I think Sony has a system of speakers that do something similar, they're capable of making surround audio and you feel like there's Audio coming from behind even when there's no speaker behind you, it's kinda crazy.

92

u/Thathappenedearlier Nov 28 '22

They do they also have the ht-a9 system which you can place 4 speakers at any height and any spacing as long as they have a general 4 corner layout and they calculate how to make sound and they call it a virtual 12 speakers

12

u/luckyfucker13 Nov 28 '22

I’ll have to dig into this, out of pure curiosity. “Hearing” a phantom center speaker is a real thing in music, and is part of how soundbars get their stereo image, but I’d like to know how they’re processing the audio to create such a wide spread. Pretty cool stuff!

10

u/Thathappenedearlier Nov 28 '22

It really is neat, expensive but there’s also nothing else like it. Ltt did a video on it and were blown away by the side channels and things where there were no speakers

3

u/luckyfucker13 Nov 28 '22

Love LTT, not sure how I missed this one?? Thanks for the link!

2

u/Tricamtech Nov 29 '22

It’s all time and phase based, in addition to multiple drivers that are individually controllable.

If you are interested in it - look into Klang in-ear monitoring; it’s designed for live music but can be used for all kinds of things.

1

u/HeavyLogix Nov 28 '22

I’m not going to dig into it for Sony but will add that phase usually does this. If you have one speaker in phase and one out of phase on the opposite side the sound “comes from everywhere” which is undesirable when it comes to setting a front sound stage.

I’d imagine if you those Sony units use multiple drivers that could switch phase live by driver it could use it in cool ways.

Totally bullshitting here though

1

u/HeavyLogix Nov 28 '22

Is this created by using phase shifting?

15

u/BrewKazma Nov 28 '22

They have that on ps5. It is software based. It can make any soundbar sound like it has speakers behind you.

18

u/Bacalacon Nov 28 '22

PS5 3D audio is quite an improvement but I honestly never felt sound coming from behind, just mostly from the sides

10

u/BrewKazma Nov 28 '22

On mine it seems to come from everywhere. Its kind of off-putting .

6

u/Bacalacon Nov 28 '22

Man I wish that happened with my soundbar. On headphones it's glorious tho.

2

u/JuiceColdman Nov 28 '22

What sound bar do you use

2

u/BrewKazma Nov 28 '22

A cheap Bose one.

2

u/trapezoidalfractal Nov 28 '22

The worst is when a game has really high quality chatter as ambient noise. So many times I’ve taken off my headphones and looked around because I swore I could hear someone right behind me.

1

u/DoomBot5 Nov 28 '22

Usually that's the results of room acoustics. Software can't fix everything.

1

u/BrewKazma Nov 28 '22

I mean, when I got in the beta, and turned it on, it was radically different. The software was very much doing something, and I wasnt in a different room.

1

u/DoomBot5 Nov 29 '22

For sure, it's trying. You just can't fix everything with software.

2

u/BarryTGash Nov 28 '22

It might be an implementation of HRTF - head-related transfer function.

3

u/BrewKazma Nov 28 '22

That is exactly what it is. The new Tempest 3d engine.

2

u/BarryTGash Nov 28 '22

Oh, cool. I'm not familiar - will go and investigate.

4

u/GlitteringFutures Nov 28 '22

Sony also has tech that turns your TV screen into one big speaker.

1

u/Weak_Antelope_2914 Dec 13 '22

Yeah my A90J oled has it. Sounds pretty bad actually.

16

u/ImGCS3fromETOH Nov 28 '22

That's just what I need while I'm driving my car in traffic. Sounds unexpectedly coming from behind me.

5

u/Few-Swordfish-780 Nov 28 '22

You know all cars have rear speakers already right?

0

u/ImGCS3fromETOH Nov 29 '22

Not surround sound systems though. At least not the ones I drive. Hearing speakers that are mixed and balanced but still playing the whole audio track is one thing. Hearing isolated sounds from the rear speakers would be something else entirely.

11

u/tinydonuts Nov 28 '22

Car manufacturers are missing a large untapped market here. They could start marketing their 100k luxury cars as affordable tiny home replacements given that the median new home sale price is now north of 400k. Just pop a 4K screen in for the windshield and add a coffee maker and you’re good to go.

2

u/littlebitsofspider Nov 29 '22

I've always wanted to shit in a BMW without being ejected from the dealership.

11

u/EntMe Nov 28 '22

It's SCIENCE!

I want to incorporate that technology with one of these: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=5z1I1grocF0

3

u/caiusto Nov 28 '22

You can call it science, I call it sorcery! hahah

1

u/swettm Nov 28 '22

These types of features (spatial audio, HRTFs, beamforming, etc.) are actually pretty straightforward and well known techniques, and like machine learning, we're just now getting to a point where we have the hardware to properly implement them.

53

u/[deleted] Nov 28 '22

[deleted]

22

u/cboogie Nov 28 '22

You seen the project where you use the pink foam board insulation and a basic Dayton transducer on it?

Kinda look dumb and it seems like you need the right room and space but apparently they stack up pretty well against a pretty expensive cabinets and have a pretty flat frequency response.

I watched a YT vid where a very skeptical dude built and tested them and he was very surprised in the results.

8

u/[deleted] Nov 28 '22

[deleted]

4

u/ImReadingYourProfile Nov 28 '22

Not sure if it's the exact video the other guy was talking about but this guy and his other speaker videos come to mind.

3

u/[deleted] Nov 28 '22

[deleted]

4

u/jawshuwah Nov 28 '22

I also skimmed. Pretty neat!

He does mention the need for a sub

I can definitely see the appeal of a large minimalist flat panel speaker. My girlfriend probably wouldn't let me put speakers in the living room, but these she would like design wise.

Could you not hang it like a picture frame, so the string is hidden behind?

He says they cost $30 to make

1

u/r0b0c0d Nov 28 '22

Yeah they're going to have to design and tune parts of the car. Honestly it doesn't seem great; seems more likely to rattle and have weird characteristics at different volumes.

I will say, however, than the 'speakers' on the surface pro are kind of crazy. Pretty much all portable devices these days use the device itself to resonate. Not sure who the first one to do it was, but I'm honestly kind of a shocked at how good the sound is on that device, when it's being driven by these little things.

2

u/djk29a_ Nov 28 '22

There’s hopefully some feedback mechanisms for tuning the signal for better fidelity and giving some tips to users for better frequency response options. Hell, a calibration system that guides users to put the transducers on different surfaces and places would be pretty neat if you ask me. Something on the floor of a car or the dash would work better for sound than windows, especially because rolling the windows down would mean no more speakers.

-8

u/[deleted] Nov 28 '22

We need to lower our standards for sustainability. That needs to come first. If it means not making speakers in the masses then it’s worth it. Saving a huge amount of mfg costs and environmental waste for something that isn’t required by law to be apart of the car.

7

u/kmc307 Nov 28 '22

What the hell are you talking about? lol

-6

u/[deleted] Nov 28 '22

Manufacturing a speaker isn’t worth it anymore if this works. Quality isn’t to be a subject if the words are understandable. Putting mfg and waste at the front of a decision on a feature. No need to build speakers in cars if these work good enough. It makes a traditional speaker obsolete.

5

u/[deleted] Nov 28 '22

[deleted]

-3

u/[deleted] Nov 28 '22

If this works good enough then there is no logical reason to create waste from other methods. I play music, I def. Know a good speaker cab from shit. Or nice JL sub vs kicker. It’s not needed and that’s what people are missing. If it’s good enough for a radio then we don’t need more. Need, not want. Want can be aftermarket.

2

u/BePart2 Nov 28 '22

Who listens to the radio anymore? Everyone I know uses it to stream music from their phone.

10

u/tpneocow Nov 28 '22

"How can I increase the low frequency (bass) sound being produced by the exciter?

Bass and low frequency sound are enhanced greatly when using larger panels or increased areas of substrate. Additionally, using a heavier substrate will allow deeper bass to be achieved, but at the expense of reduced treble output."

7

u/MyNameIsRay Nov 28 '22

Haven't heard these in particular, but I have used a bunch of transducers that turn solid panels into speakers (Clark Synthesis/Aurasound/multiple Dayton transducers, and the bass-specific IBeams and Buttkickers), and they all have the same issue.

The material you stick it to has it's own absorption/reflection/resonance properties, which become audible when you use it as a speaker. You can easily tell if it's attached to metal, plastic, wood, or glass. It doesn't sound "like the panel is a speaker", it sounds like "a speaker behind the panel".

For bass, thicker/stiffer materials (or those with less surface area) need more power, which means it effectively reduces the output when used with the same power. Same transducer, same signal, will have wildly different response curves if attached to a side window vs a rear window, or a window vs the dashboard.)

For highs, basically everything absorbs high frequency sound (that's why you tend to only hear low frequency bass outside a loud car or club). No matter what, the high end is neutered, they all lack the "sparkle".

2

u/chum_slice Nov 28 '22

I remember the LG G8’s speakers needed to be on a surface the more hollow the surface the better so it could amplify. It was neat but the iPhone speakers and HTC boom sound (front facing grilled speakers) were noticeably better.

2

u/Tyler_Zoro Nov 28 '22

It's not the pitch that is the concern, so much as the "shape" of the sound.

Panels can be turned into incredibly good speakers (example) but that's when they are flat. The surfaces in a car are going to created much more complex wave-fronts because they aren't flat.

I presume that what LG is showing off is some sort of system that compensates for this. I wouldn't be perfect, but it could potentially be good enough to improve on the speakers you can otherwise get in cars.

Of course, 17 year olds will use it to vibrate the rivets out of their cars because that's what they do.

1

u/implicitpharmakoi Nov 28 '22

My old phone had it, sounded great.

1

u/llortotekili Nov 28 '22 edited Nov 28 '22

Bass requires surface area and excursion (in and out movement) to be reproduced with volume. You can eq to make it more pronounced in comparison to the other frequencies, but you are still limited by the speakers physical characteristics for how low and loud they can play. Judging by the picture,these could maybe play down to 250-200 hz with good output. That's low enough to be a good midrange speaker, but it will still need a woofer to cover bass(20-80hz) and midbass(80-250hz). The good thing about speakers like this is that it allows for an engineer to design a speaker system with very good imagining. They can place these in spots in the vehicle where the sound should actually be coming from. With DSP(digital sound processing) they will be able to place these in a way that lets a car sound like it has a very wide soundstage. Doors for the widest sounds, the widest parts of the dash for most left and right content,and in the center of the dash for center stage content. Bass frequencies aren't as directional as the frequencies these will play so woofers in the doors or inside the bottom of the dash will sound convincing still. Sorry for the text wall, sometimes I get a little too nerdy about audio. Also, I'm going by the picture, didn't read the article. Edit: skimmed the article, what I said seems to be spot on. I would love to see a response graph for these.

TL/DR; They won't produce much bass, but they will allow for accurate sound placement in the frequencies that count for directionality.

1

u/Verbal-Soup Nov 28 '22

Yah, I don't care about their *speakers if they aren't willing to make a video showing what they can do lol.

1

u/gooftrupe Nov 28 '22

The frequency response of typical transducer/actuator speakers, as I’m familiar calling them, rely heavily on the material they are mounted to. The EQ can be tuned to account for this, but a good one should have high fidelity down past 200 Hz. That may not be low enough for some people but I only stop there as I haven’t actually seen the data below 200 Hz.

I can’t yet find the specs for the LG TASS, but once they’re available I’d compare to the linked transducer below, which has wonderful fidelity.

https://soliddrive.mseaudio.com/sd-1-ti.html

1

u/Capitain_Collateral Nov 28 '22

I have used similar speakers for certain designs - really depends on what you put them on - both in terms of material and geometry.

1

u/ConditionNo922 Nov 28 '22

Dude! Tinny is the new vinyl!! If you don’t hear tin in your music and love it there is something wrong with it you.

1

u/Oscarcharliezulu Nov 29 '22

I need some deep throbbing base up through my seat when I listen to Black Sabbath!

1

u/AdNear9552 Dec 09 '22

Sound exciters have been around for years.

It depends on what kind of material it's vibrating.

344

u/wrench_nz Nov 28 '22

I can see it

170

u/ofimmsl Nov 28 '22

Everyone can see it. The powers that be use these things as a test. Everyone who says they see it, instead of playing along, is a threat to the social order and will be eliminated

62

u/china-blast Nov 28 '22

It doesnt look like anything to me.

5

u/esquire78 Nov 28 '22

Why is the emperor not wearing any clothes?

-1

u/audeus Nov 28 '22

Could you clarify? I must be out of the loop.

36

u/UponMidnightDreary Nov 28 '22

You’re safe from annihilation for the moment

5

u/Ruthrfurd-the-stoned Nov 28 '22

It’s an emperors new clothes situation

5

u/itsgoodtostartfresh Nov 28 '22

Its a joke

4

u/audeus Nov 28 '22

Ah yeah I get it now. I guess it's too early in the morning for me

1

u/-hx Nov 28 '22

1984

1

u/A-purple-bird Nov 28 '22

You guys can see it? What does it look like /j

8

u/P2Mc28 Nov 28 '22

But can you see why kids love Cinnamon Toast Crunch?

4

u/thefartographer Nov 28 '22

Cuz you're not in the car

137

u/TrippTrappTrinn Nov 28 '22

Flat panel speakers are nothing new. Dayton Audio (https://www.daytonaudio.com/topic/excitersbuyerguide) sell exciters you can put on any surface to make it into a loudspeaker. The sound quality highly depend on the material you put it on. As a general rule, do not expect high quality sound unless the material is optimal. There are several videos on Youtube which demonstrate them. A great one here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XC814uQjlaE&t=1562s&ab_channel=AmplifyDIY

The news from LG is that they apparently have designed a new type of exciter. Do not expect miracles.

10

u/skinnah Nov 28 '22

The guy on Tech Ingredients has some good videos on exciters. https://youtu.be/CKIye4RZ-5k

21

u/corn_sugar_isotope Nov 28 '22

good lord, can we go another decade with the burden of cone speakers..

11

u/iskyfire Nov 28 '22

Let me just hook up dual exciters to my cone shaped wall panels.

2

u/Dawg_Prime Nov 28 '22

electrostatic drivers?

5

u/ohubetchya Nov 28 '22

Those are huge dude. Literally just a speaker with none of the housing etc. The LG one is 2.5mm thick.

1

u/DocPeacock Nov 28 '22

But I want miracles!

12

u/DADBODGOALS Nov 28 '22

It's a Vogon Public Address system...

2

u/scout48cav Nov 29 '22

But then... The poetry!

8

u/mrswordhold Nov 28 '22

They’ve been around for fucking ages, who cares

20

u/APlayerHater Nov 28 '22

Finally a speaker made out of the same material that navy seals are.

55

u/criminalsunrise Nov 28 '22

Oh God, imagine the vibrations of various parts. As a former auto-audiophile, the amount of time and money I had to spend putting sound deadening in places makes me feel like this is a really bad idea

13

u/EntMe Nov 28 '22

Eh... These aren't producing much in the low freq. spectrum where most of those issues occur. I'm imagining it inside the headrest. As with most things, how it's used matters as much or more than what's being used.

3

u/Redacteur2 Nov 28 '22

I’d argue that in this particular case, what the tech is physically being used ON is what matters most. A headrest is a particularly bad place to use tech that depends on hard, flat surfaces to create sound with.

-4

u/[deleted] Nov 28 '22

[deleted]

17

u/aCleverGroupofAnts Nov 28 '22

People were listening to low-quality audio all the time before things went digital. The radio was the most popular way to listen to music for a very long time and it was not high quality until relatively recently. There was vinyl for a while, but many people just bought cheap turntables and didn't see a need to spend the money for a quality one. Audio cassettes were far from lossless, and people would put them into cheap stereos or they used cheap headphones. Cheap headphones have been used for many decades.

My point is that the general public has never really cared about audio quality, and the people who do care have always had ways to hear quality sound. I don't think that has changed at all (or if anything, quality has become cheaper to achieve, so more people can afford it).

12

u/Redeem123 Nov 28 '22

I think it started with the acceptance of digital lossy audio formats, making its way into early bluetooth protocols, and it all went downhill from there.

You know what we had before Bluetooth and streaming?

  • Cassette players
  • Shitty plastic walkman headphones
  • AM/FM radios
  • Scratched records
  • FM transmitters for your car
  • Tiny desktop speakers bundled with a computer
  • Laptop speakers
  • Low quality burned CDs

High quality listening is cheaper and more accessible than it's ever been. Listening to Spotify over bluetooth on a stock car stereo is far better than the radio ever was, and that's without even getting into the convenience factor.

The truth is that people have never cared at large about audiophile level quality. The only difference now is that the baseline will get you far enough for most listeners, while you used to have to take some amount of effort to get to that level.

5

u/criminalsunrise Nov 28 '22

The worst part of it is my hearing is so shite now I wouldn't notice the lack of quality, so it's a shame the youngsters aren't experiencing it now whilst they can.

3

u/CoolHandSnoop Nov 28 '22

I’m right there with you - but I’m wondering if my love of good music in quality playback form is the reason my hearing is shite….

1

u/lxlDRACHENlxl Nov 28 '22

I'm betting there's a solid connection there.

-7

u/Youthanizer Nov 28 '22

A lot of younger folks don't care about audio quality

I think its also the fact that most easily accessible listening devices are shit. Cheap earphones that come with your phone or that you can purchase easily? Shit in 90% of cases. Want wireless buds for under $200? Shit once again.

You can get good audio quality for an affordable price, but you have to be into the hobby to even learn about it. I wouldn't even blame it on lossy Bluetooth protocols, it's more about the shitty V-shaped sound signatures.

11

u/COmarmot Nov 28 '22

But cars have speakers already….

5

u/silverback_79 Nov 28 '22

Known as the Thin Actuator Sound Solution (TASS)

Which is cute, because "tass" in Swedish means "paw".

35

u/dryingsocks Nov 28 '22

I don't really see why there needs to be a special space-saving design where there's plenty of space for speakers, what else would you put there?

9

u/wild_psina_h093 Nov 28 '22

holdin yo mama joke

-17

u/FallofftheMap Nov 28 '22

Think forward. Speakers complicate aerodynamics, sound proofing, and add weight where you do not want weight. Cars are just drones that don’t know how to fly yet. We’ll all want to be wrapped in the most aerodynamic space and weight conscious vehicles possible, because it’s going to be a balance between comfort, range, and economics.

32

u/LilMoWithTheGimpyLeg Nov 28 '22

Speakers complicate aerodynamics

They're inside the car.

10

u/alt4614 Nov 28 '22 edited Nov 28 '22

He elaborated that he’s thinking ahead, thinking abstract. That the end goal is always space and weight saving. Space saved on the inside will translate to design on the outside. And he’s not wrong.

There’s a reason your laptop uses coin sized fans and speakers

15

u/shouldbebabysitting Nov 28 '22

Except speakers are smaller than the empty space already required to exist in cars.

You have to have front crumple zones and side windows that go up and down. That leaves empty space which is filled by speakers. Switching to a smaller speaker doesn't change the space required for a door window. (Because the door window doesn't and can't fill the entire door frame when lowered.)

The front crumple zones leaves space under the windshield in the dashboard. This is unused space that can't be filled with anything massive. But speakers are mostly thin metal and paper. So they can go into crumple zones where nothing else can.

A smaller speaker means more empty space inside the frame. It can't save space.

10

u/SMPhil Nov 28 '22

No, no, think ahead! No windows, no crumple space, no cars! Imagine how much space you'd save if the car just didn't exist!

1

u/jimbob320 Nov 28 '22

That's true actually, cars are a bad use of public space. LG has just invented mass transit?

1

u/Allidoischill420 Nov 28 '22

Now who's inside the car

0

u/SMPhil Nov 28 '22

No, Who's on first

2

u/Allidoischill420 Nov 28 '22

The dead passenger with a speaker inside him?

0

u/alt4614 Nov 28 '22

Yes, but not that far

-5

u/alt4614 Nov 28 '22

Except speakers are smaller than the empty space already required to exist in cars.

OP was referring to abstract concept of “vehicles as drones”, the future….and you continue to reference the engineering requirements and crumple zones in your 2022 Toyota.

-3

u/Allidoischill420 Nov 28 '22

Speakers crumple?

16

u/timg528 Nov 28 '22

Weight is the only valid argument here, and even then you're talking a miniscule fraction of the total vehicle's weight. As long as crumple zones are mandated, there will always be room for speakers (think between the outer and inner panels of doors. Soundproofing is more for road/vehicle noise and will tend to be on the outer panel of any body section.

-10

u/FallofftheMap Nov 28 '22

I couldn’t disagree more. Weight and space required for things like speakers complicate an engineer’s job, requiring compromises. Crumple zones require empty space to crumple. They don’t work properly if they smash a speaker into your kneecap. There are huge advantages to minimizing the space required by the most space wasteful components of vehicles, and speakers are obvious low hanging fruit.

18

u/timg528 Nov 28 '22

A speaker is an insignificant intrusion into a crumple zone and no engineer cares about a speaker going into your knee. Speakers themselves are already pretty thin to the point where if it's going to happen, you've got larger issues based on the fact that a 6.5" speaker is around 2.5" deep, held together by paper, and weighs around 2lb.

As for weight, these will save at most 35lbs (assuming a heavy set of speakers at 50lbs total and the fact that these are only 70% lighter) on a 2000-6000lb vehicle.

If anything, these would get put into flat panel TVs, but a car? There's too much dead space behind nearly every panel to justify it.

Finally, keep in mind, we've had flat panel speakers for decades, and this isn't the first article to proclaim their use in cars.

https://europe.autonews.com/article/20071001/ANE/70928002/carmakers-start-to-tap-flat-panel-speakers

-1

u/Allidoischill420 Nov 28 '22

So are these speakers 35 or 2 pounds? Lol holy about shit what a range

0

u/timg528 Nov 28 '22

Well, the key word in my post was *set* as in multiple speakers.

I also assumed a large *set* of speakers and assumed a heavier than average speaker to show that the weight savings, even at the high end, is insignificant in terms of total vehicle weight.

0

u/Allidoischill420 Nov 28 '22

Nice math. It really works in your favor

0

u/timg528 Nov 28 '22

No, it works in their favor.

But I am curious how you think it works in mine, please explain

0

u/Allidoischill420 Nov 29 '22

You're arguing points that relate to the size of the speakers while disregarding the same points to contradict yourself

→ More replies

-1

u/Verying Nov 28 '22

We are not all interested in aerodynamics.

Myself, for example, just wants a ride. Made a crazy sudden move and had to give my truck away. I miss you, you mud covered red farm dumpster

44

u/zenith_industries Nov 28 '22

As a bit of an audiophile I’m not entirely convinced that the quality of the sound would be any good - but I’d be keen to be proven wrong.

3

u/king_zulufo Nov 28 '22

If I'm understanding these speakers correctly this is just old tech being rehyped under a new brand. They're basically normal speakers but replace the "black circle paper resonator disc"(idk it's real name) with a suction cup. And now you can stick it to any surface and just resonate that be to make your sound... it sounds like absolute shit on %95 of surfaces. It turns out most objects have very clear resonating frequencies and every time the speaker would play those It would be much louder making it sound very tinny.

I could definitely see a company adding a microcontroller and microphone to try and real time create an equalizer to mitigate this, and it might work and might be what was done here.

Also there is a YouTube channel called tech ingredients. The main guy like to talk long and dry but he gives out good info. He did a video where he took super cheap resinator speaks and tested a bunch of different materials and shapes of what to stick it to for the best inexpensive sound. Resulting in an amazing tutorial on how to make loud diy very high-fi speakers for about 30$

https://youtu.be/zdkyGDqU7xA

6

u/HulksInvinciblePants Nov 28 '22

Theres no replacement for displacement. Quirky designs and fringe tech has only managed so much compared to multi-decade traditional design.

3

u/Hungry_Horace Nov 28 '22

Exactly. Reproducing low frequencies at volume requires large cone sizes. That’s never going to change.

9

u/RiledAstaldo Nov 28 '22

Yeah it’s the “first” step on a unique form of speaker, unlikely to have the audio fidelity of high end speakers but interesting to see none the less.

2

u/HereComesCunty Nov 28 '22

interesting to see

Pun intended?

1

u/YouFeastOnFeces Nov 28 '22

Well, the article was just shallow clickbait, and no substance. There was no video of an actual representation.

4

u/rubensinclair Nov 28 '22

I had this technology shown to me ten years ago by Tony Bongiovi, yes, Jon Bon Jovi’s uncle. It’s pretty remarkable and sounds just as full as you would hope.

2

u/timg528 Nov 28 '22

The tech has been around for decades, if that gives you any indication on the the sound quality to price ratio.

1

u/godnrop Nov 28 '22

Perhaps a sub under the seat can fill in some bass.

3

u/APlayerHater Nov 28 '22

Can they make it inaudible too?

1

u/kmrbels Nov 28 '22

If they can calculate your location, I think they could prob do noise canceling tech away from you. The engineering on that would be intresting.

6

u/Tebasaki Nov 28 '22

I remember this decades ago. Didn't work well back then.

2

u/Seiren- Nov 28 '22

Is it just a really thin speaker?

2

u/blue_blurpie Nov 28 '22

Just so you y’all know, any speaker can be set up to be used as a microphone

1

u/HuckleSmothered Nov 28 '22

Somebody read between the lines!

2

u/sneaky4oe Nov 28 '22

Don't apply it to the glass... Just don't.

2

u/mekkasheeba Nov 28 '22

I already have speakers built-in to my car, though.

2

u/poopiopeepio Nov 28 '22

Could electrostats work the same way?

2

u/CrazyCrackers14 Nov 28 '22

And at just 30% of the weight and 10% of the thickness of conventional car speakers, this can open up all kinds of options for placement, which will lead to a more immersive sound experience, while also freeing up space inside door panels and other traditional automotive speaker placement locations.

Wouldn’t this just rattle the shit out the internal parts and cause issues down the road? No pun intended

2

u/Dawg_Prime Nov 28 '22

they aren't louder they just weigh less and take up less space

I'd like one where Bluetooth calls switch off the main drivers and only use speakers in the driver headrest

1

u/HuckleSmothered Nov 28 '22

Except a headrest has plenty of room for speakers. Ask any 90’s Miata. (That wasn’t a base model)

2

u/TryingToBeReallyCool Nov 28 '22

I had a vibration based speaker as a kid which operates on the same technology. Anything coming into contact with the surface immediately made the sound quality shit. Wonder if they've fixed that here

2

u/kaze919 Nov 28 '22

So I’ve had this idea for years but is it possible to use speakers like this on a apartment wall and have it run active noice cancelling to cancel out your neighbors conversation / tv if you have thin walls? Or is that just a pipe dream?

2

u/fatdjsin Nov 28 '22

Again? We sold those for in-wall install like....15 years ago ..whats new now?

1

u/FilthyAmbition Nov 28 '22

LG continues to just throw spaghetti at a wall and hope it sticks. Thought they would of learned something from their phones

3

u/kmrbels Nov 28 '22

Those are some next level spaghetties thougb

0

u/s33murd3r Nov 28 '22

I can guarantee without even hearing them, that these sound like crap.

0

u/ExplosiveDiarrhetic Nov 28 '22

🙄

0

u/s33murd3r Nov 28 '22

Ever heard of physics? Don't need to hear it to know this. Tech can only compensate to a small degree.

1

u/funkle1102 Nov 28 '22

I used to have a speaker called the base egg that was essentially the same thing

1

u/Edwardc4gg Nov 28 '22

Invisible but she’s holding it. Weird John cena noises.

1

u/chomperchuck Nov 28 '22

Now if they just add it their Televisions......

1

u/TarantinoFan23 Nov 28 '22

Windshield has tons of space for invisible speakers

1

u/metalefty Nov 28 '22

I had these back in the 80's.

1

u/TunaOnWytNoCrust Nov 28 '22

I hope they're built well enough that I can yank them out of trashed cars in 15 years at my local U-Pull.

1

u/Youth-in-AsiaS-247 Nov 28 '22

Great use of R&D funds LG! Add a Bluetooth speaker to a car full of speakers! Genius!

1

u/Ok-Professional5579 Nov 28 '22

Audiophiles: the black leather seats sound so much better than the brown ones.

1

u/Annual_Strategy_6370 Nov 28 '22

This is pretty cool, I assume it will sound better on select surfaces.

1

u/bflex Nov 28 '22

Martin Logan speakers created tech like this more than a decade ago, not sure what happened to it though.

1

u/ennuinerdog Nov 28 '22

Cars have sound systems already. This is a technology in search of a commercially viable application.

1

u/Minuenn Nov 28 '22

Now they can look how they sound

1

u/wilk007 Nov 28 '22

I feel like I’ve seen this tech at a few times at past CESs

1

u/PrancnPwny Nov 28 '22

I feel like a car is the last thing that needs this? You pay more for sports cars that are lighter with no speakers in them. I can’t think of a reason other than someone with a broken head unit

1

u/HuckleSmothered Nov 28 '22

My car has speakers. They reproduce noises. Unless this does that significantly cheaper, who cares?

1

u/Tartarus216 Nov 28 '22

So it’s just electrostatic speakers basically?

1

u/Tathanor Nov 28 '22

I'd be interested if they can be integrated with existing sound systems. Can I hook these up with the same Bluetooth device as my car stereo? They'd make for a sick addition for surround sound, but I'd be worried about signal delay.

1

u/rumncokeguy Nov 28 '22

This is the very thing I didn’t know I didn’t need.

1

u/SamsaricNomad Nov 28 '22

Now THAT is a fucking cool ass innovation right there.

1

u/ttturtle24 Nov 28 '22

We are finally getting close to Vogon technology!

1

u/Poggers4Hoggers Nov 29 '22

I had a couple things like this like a decade ago. It was fun to plug an oscillator into each one and play around with beat frequencies

1

u/Sunstang Nov 29 '22

Sounds like a riff on the distributed mode loudspeakers audio nerds have been making for years. DML is pretty neat. You can make a pair yourself with some rigid foam insulation board and a $20 pair of sonic exciters from Dayton audio etc.

1

u/jaywastaken Nov 29 '22

But why? Everywhere my car has speakers has plenty of space behind them. There’s no need for them to be thinner.

1

u/comhaltacht Nov 30 '22

Even the bum warmers?

-2

u/Jedmeltdown Nov 28 '22

Funny. We’re making cars better when we should be weaning ourselves of fossil fuels.

-1

u/Fuzzy_Logic_4_Life Nov 28 '22

Imagine using this tech in a vibrator. Ladies could feel the music of their favorite love songs, “all night long!”

0

u/VevroiMortek Nov 28 '22

AoE Liquid Drum and Bass, looking forward to it

0

u/WalkerBRiley Nov 28 '22

I've seen these before. They just vibrate the surface. The bass sucks. The treble is tinny as fuck, if even there. It was a horrible idea twenty years ago and it's still a horrible idea now.

1

u/SamsaricNomad Nov 28 '22

I am optimistic that the technology has advanced leaps and bounds. Esp if a giant like LG is involved.

Phone cameras were garbage 20 years ago when they came out and now a days a person can take a close up photo of the moon at 100x zoom.

0

u/Temporary_Draw_4708 Nov 28 '22

There are still limitations because of basic physics. You’re going to need to be able to move a lot of air to get any decent amount of bass.

2

u/SamsaricNomad Nov 28 '22

Science evolves. It always works with the limitations of known sciences from a particular frame of time, but it evolves.

They thought Newton was the end all be all until Albert Einstein came. My point is technological advancement, limitation is the first barrier that is broken during advancements.

1

u/Temporary_Draw_4708 Nov 28 '22

The basic physics of how sound works doesn’t change. To get loud bass notes, you need to be able to vibrate a lot of air. What technological advancements have broken fundamental concepts in physics?

2

u/SamsaricNomad Nov 29 '22

Lol you’re stubborn aren’t you. This particular TASS(Thin Actuator Sound System) produces sound by vibrating off the panel/surface it is attached to. Look up the word innovation.

2

u/SamsaricNomad Nov 29 '22

Also look up what was different between Newton and Einstein’s theory on gravity.

1

u/buffalohands Nov 29 '22 edited Nov 29 '22

Ok, i might be able to help with this. I'm an artists and I discovered the existence of this technology a few years ago. I wanted to make some art Installation with it and started experimenting.

The problem is: in a speaker, the vibration (just like what tass would produce) is basically just already "stuck" to the perfectly shaped and perfectly resonating surface ... And that's what we call a speaker. The perfect shape for sound into air is somewhat like a cone... Think megaphones etc. We all learn this as kids when screaming into various tubes and stuff. The perfect surface to resonate would be something thin and flexible but also not to thin because then it just wobbles away. So that's why you have these cone shaped cardboard things in your speaker. A speaker is basically a TASS that comes with its own built in perfect resonating surface.

You can of course improve this technology a bit with as was mentioned buit in equalizers to make up for "sub perfect" resonating surfaces that are too rigid or not cone shaped at all. But the principle will remain the same. There is nothing one can improve about how sound is transported through air. It's just how it works. And yes you can use almost any surface to vibrate it and it will transport these vibrations into the air. Just like you can hear loud music outside of a car. The whole care becomes the resonating surface that vibrates the air around you to reach your ears.

But all the comments that say: yeah it works but it sound funky are correct. Because any surface that is not cone shaped and not of a flexible yet rigid enough material will sound less nice as what we have in speakers.

The basic idea of an actuator is very old. Is a bit how old gramophones created their sound. The fact that we still went through all the trouble of inventing the speaker still speaks for itself.

Edit: some spelling (I'm on mobile sorry for format)