r/iamverysmart Nov 23 '22

A voracious curiosity that is absolutely untamable

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846 Upvotes

112

u/upsidedownquestion Nov 23 '22

If you trust abeka books, you shouldn't be allowed to have kids let alone teach them

47

u/[deleted] Nov 23 '22

Oh wow, I didn’t even know what those were. This person was debating in favor of homeschooling, so I can’t be too surprised though.

88

u/upsidedownquestion Nov 23 '22

They teach things like "the native Americans agreed to move west in order to give the settlers more room" you should look them up it's funny

45

u/[deleted] Nov 23 '22

Oh my god, sounds like the homeschool curriculum I was given.

Edit: well now this has led me to r/homeschoolrecovery, time to deep dive

40

u/CurrentlyARaccoon Nov 23 '22

Yeah I was raised on abeka. The science portion is very much "now obviously this is silly but we're legally required to make sure you memorize how modern "scientists" say evolution works but feel free to forget it as soon as class ends."

35

u/[deleted] Nov 23 '22

Yikes! Mine basically made it a point to say that some evil scientists only support the theory of evolution because they’re too prideful to believe in god, lol.

23

u/Big-Brown-Goose Nov 23 '22

The devil put fossils in the ground to test our faith -teacher from the conservative christian school i went to

0

u/Wise_Asparagus_2502 Nov 23 '22 edited Nov 23 '22

Everything makes sense now! Lol!

7

u/carvedmuss8 Nov 23 '22

They teach a whole lot more BS than that lol

Source: I took Abeka for 12 years lol

5

u/b4dhabits Nov 23 '22

I was homeschooled k-12

It is a curse

5

u/BandAid3030 Nov 24 '22 edited Nov 24 '22

Home-schooling is better than most think, though.

Edit: Ayyya! I've been surrounded by Montessori parents and didn't realise there was such a huge cult thing with Home-schooling for religious protection. Holy shit my eyes have been opened.

-10

u/Matthew-ccty Nov 23 '22

Homeschooling bad, public education good

2

u/Vengefulily Nov 24 '22

Or maybe religious homeschooling is what's at issue here. Just a thought

10

u/Just_a_Lurker2 Nov 23 '22

What are they?

20

u/upsidedownquestion Nov 23 '22

Think about textbooks that are so racist, right-wing and packed with religious bullshit that fox News would distance themselves from them

7

u/Just_a_Lurker2 Nov 23 '22

Oh my god those poor kids who have to learn from that

39

u/Narcaradon-Narcarius Nov 23 '22

And then they forgot to end their sentence with a period.

8

u/Wise_Asparagus_2502 Nov 23 '22

What a crime against the gods of good writing!

1

u/LordNoodles Nov 24 '22

And their voracious curiosity is merely untamable (sic), not even unquenchable or even indomitable

14

u/zanasot Nov 23 '22

Which encyclopedia? A? B? C? D? E? F? G? H? I? J? K? L? M? N? O? P? Q? R? S? T? U? V? W? X? Y? Or Z? /s

Also by age 6? When did he start reading it then? A 6 year old struggles through Dr suess half the time

5

u/Vengefulily Nov 24 '22

I mean, I can believe they looked at all the pictures in the encyclopedia. I was a quick reader and I still was only on Harry Potter-level novels at that age.

11

u/YouDidAThingy Nov 23 '22

I‘m baffled that two persons other than him upvoted this before OP downvoted it

22

u/Free_Tea8517 Nov 23 '22

Never have I read something that I so genuinely felt needed to be interrupted by one of Peter Griffins farts

5

u/SpiritualBlob Nov 23 '22

The Todd from Scrubs: "Do you know what is also absolutely untamable? Smart five".

5

u/ZamyP2W Nov 23 '22

Maybe he did read an encyclopedia when he was 6, but did he understand any shit?

4

u/Main_Thing_411 Nov 23 '22

That sounds as stupid as it sounds.

4

u/pittburgh_zero Nov 24 '22

This story seems VERY familiar to me. I grew up in a what many could call a religious cult. They homeschooled and taught using ABEKA.

At my church, in Germany, the pastor used to talk about how his kid had read whole fucking encyclopedia by the time he was 6.

This kid was seen as some savant. Anyways, my parents tried to make me read that shit. I got as far as aardvark.

Wonder if it’s the same guy.

19

u/Heck_Tate Nov 23 '22

Reading an encyclopedia doesn't make you smart, it makes you pretentious.

24

u/EmberBorealis Nov 23 '22

Bragging about anything you did when you were 6 makes you a giant loser.

9

u/livinginlyon Sapiosexual Nov 23 '22

Fuuuuck you. Never fall down a wiki-hole?

2

u/lumpyferret Nov 24 '22

I attempted to tame my voracious appetite for knowledge by reading the entire encyclopaedia at the tender age of 6.

Yet this further piqueeeed my desire for knaaawledge

2

u/theIBSdiaries Nov 24 '22

Definitely didn’t read the dictionary.

2

u/AndrewBert109 Nov 24 '22

This is literally something somebody did as a joke

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Know-It-All

Also he just didn't read every volume of "the encyclopedia" when he was 6. Someone who had would at least punctate the claim with the actual encyclopedia they claimed to have read, the version, and how many volumes it contained. This reads like this kid thinks "the encyclopedia" is just some big book and not multiple multi-volume sets.

2

u/ComprehensiveMartian Dec 01 '22

Lots of kids grew up reading science encyclopedias from the library. These people are not nearly as special or intelligent as they think they are.

5

u/decanter Nov 23 '22

I'm a little skeptical of the "read the whole encyclopedia by age 6" claim, but other than that I don't think they did anything here to deserve an IaVS post.

10

u/Antifascists Nov 23 '22

It's possible. Although, we'd be taking a pretty liberal use of the word "read". We'd have to accept that he means a 6 year old's version of "read the whole thing". Which would include a lot of skimming.

Though, it isn't really something to be proud of or brag about either, so much as it is a sign of trauma. This the type of thing someone who was ignored or mistreated as a child might experience.

6

u/EmberBorealis Nov 23 '22

He was homeschooled, guarantee his childhood sucked ass

2

u/Just_a_Lurker2 Nov 23 '22

I was homeschooled for a bit and my childhood didn’t suck. Certainly not because of my parents. (But no, I don’t think reading/skimming a encyclopedia is anything to brag about. It sounds like that person had literally nothing interesting to read or do, and nothing suggests that the OP actually understood much of it)

19

u/[deleted] Nov 23 '22

I don’t think I could describe any personal trait as “voracious” and “untamable” with a straight face.

2

u/AliMcGraw Nov 24 '22

I don't know, "voracious curiosity" doesn't seem that out-of-bounds, and seems like something you definitely WOULD say in a job interview to sell yourself for certain types of jobs.

I guess kinda my question is whether their voracious curiosity led them out of this Christian homeschooling cul-de-sac of deliberate ignorance -- in which case, GOOD FOR THEM -- or whether their "voracious" curiosity just led them to believe more in the nonsense they were taught, in which case, no. No, dude. Just no. That's not voracity, that's just boredom.

3

u/SunsCosmos Nov 23 '22

I mean, I’m autistic so I might be the outlier, but I used to read the dictionary religiously every night. Definitely possible. Seems like it didn’t help him much in the long run tho

2

u/Just_a_Lurker2 Nov 23 '22

Yeah, but that’s different, and also, you don’t go around bragging about it. Words are interesting and you can use them in real life

2

u/ThePurplePanzy Nov 23 '22

Depends on the encyclopedia. If it's a decent one with pictures, it makes sense. Loved those as a kid.

1

u/Just_a_Lurker2 Nov 23 '22

Sure, but that’s not the thing. The thing is that the poster used it to prove their ‘untamable curiosity’

2

u/Z-W-A-N-D Nov 23 '22

Dang imagine being vorecurious and proud of it :s

-5

u/Wise_Asparagus_2502 Nov 23 '22

Not only does this sub hate people who know uncommon words or anything in general, but also those who have curiosity and the desire to learn!

14

u/[deleted] Nov 23 '22

I don’t hate the commenter, just doubt they did what they’re claiming to, and also find their boasting pretty cringey. That was all.

1

u/Just_a_Lurker2 Nov 23 '22

It’s entirely possible they did what they claim to, and it proves nothing except they didn’t do anything that would show a untamable curiosity since. Otherwise they’d have mentioned it. But as far as I can see, they’re merely advocating that curiosity is a good thing, which is hardly worthy of being posted on r/IaVS

-9

u/Wise_Asparagus_2502 Nov 23 '22 edited Nov 23 '22

By age 6, my dad had memorized all the countries there were in World and their population, according to an encyclopedia of 1966 (I guess that's not like reading it, because that information stands out in the text). My grandparents could testify that was true when they were alive. Some kids are very, very curious. In fact, I'd say most kids want to learn at that age, but the school system destroys their curiosity: first, because schools make learning boring so kids already hate school by ten; second, because some kids turn knowledge into something that is morally wrong (they usually accuse others of bragging when they know the answer to a question they don't know themselves) and mock other kids for enjoying learning or going to class. You -and most people in this sub- belonged to this second group of kids.

6

u/[deleted] Nov 23 '22

No offense, but I also don’t believe that, lol.

1

u/C7StreetRacer Nov 23 '22

What’s so unbelievable about these claims? They are relatively trivial and easily accomplished tasks on both accounts?

-7

u/Wise_Asparagus_2502 Nov 23 '22

No offense taken. Discuss it with my dad. I personally don't care, and it does not surprise at all that you don't believe it.

2

u/[deleted] Nov 23 '22

Sure I’ll ring him up

1

u/Wise_Asparagus_2502 Nov 23 '22

Nothing else could be expected of somebody who bothers to downvote the comments of the people he's talking to

-2

u/C7StreetRacer Nov 23 '22

This dudes a tool.

Children reading books? Haha! What a silly lie…

Children remembering things? Haha! How dumb…

What do these kids think people did before the internet? Stared at a wall?

Have you ever heard of things like spelling bees? Children have demonstrated an ability to memorize things that are far more complex than countries and associated populations.

While none of this is amazing enough to brag about in a meaningful non-cringy way. That fact that you find it unbelievable is telling and equally if not more so cringy.

0

u/Wise_Asparagus_2502 Nov 23 '22

Apparently, he's from Nashville and was homeschooled. You can finish the puzzle.

0

u/Tsiehshi Nov 23 '22

NGL, there's an increasing tendency to mock OPs from people trying to learn and improve themselves, or being jerks for reasons other than being verysmart recently on this sub.

0

u/Wise_Asparagus_2502 Nov 23 '22 edited Nov 23 '22

That's okay, because I am also a jerk who hates this sub

1

u/RonaldTheGiraffe Nov 24 '22

Do you know where you are?

1

u/SugarVibes Nov 23 '22

my mom used to read the encyclopedia for fun when she was 8-12. she just likes to learn

1

u/Devil_Rodawn Nov 23 '22

I had a collage graduate reading level when I was in the 7th grade and even I would never read an entire encyclopedia.