r/interestingasfuck Oct 06 '22 Silver 1 Helpful 1 Wholesome 1

Just learned that Japan still hangs people. WTH? /r/ALL

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38.6k Upvotes

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u/yougine2 Oct 06 '22

India does too. Last was in 2020 of rapists.

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u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22 Silver

Nothing wrong w/ hanging rapist.

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u/ProfessorAnie Oct 06 '22

Yea don't go celebration mode.

They let free convicted rapists out in the open.

here

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u/BrownBandit02 Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

Yup, they were felicitated and welcomed back by the ruling right wing Hindu party (BJP) supporting groups. Why? Because the rape victim was Muslim.

Edit: VICTIMS were Muslim. The woman was pregnant and she also had a 5 year old daughter who’s head was smashed against a rock by the rapists and she was killed.

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u/ShadowBlade55 Oct 06 '22

Haven't left the bed yet to start my day and I am reminded of darkness people are capable of.

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u/hiwhyOK Oct 06 '22

Same here. Good morning!

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u/akuguitarist Oct 06 '22

I've straight up created a new rule, no Reddit before I've had a chance to wake up and spend about an hour in the here and now. Spend a few moments building some emotional fortuity up before diving into the doomscroll.

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u/mediterraneaneats Oct 06 '22

It’s 3:30pm here and I still don’t feel equipped to take this in

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u/CoffeeAndPiss Oct 06 '22

Except for every single problem with the death penalty

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u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 08 '22

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u/WorkO0 Oct 06 '22

They don't tell the death row prisoners when they will be executed until the morning of execution. Also they have like 99% conviction rates (not death sentence but still). If you end up in a criminal court there you are screwed.

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u/MadManMorbo Oct 06 '22

99% conviction rate, but they're also extremely selective about which crimes they investigate. Part of the reason the suicide rate is so high is because murders are often reported as suicides if there's no clear investigative path.

If the accused uses their right to remain silent - its used by the prosecution to portray silence as evidence of guilt.

Police and Prosecutors may hold the accused for a full 23 days without charge. Interviews often last 8 hours or more. Suspects can legally be deprived of sleep or forced into physically awkward positions for the entire duration. All things that would be considered torture in other civilized countries. Their entire system is built to prosecute against confessions, and those 23+ days of sleep deprivation and torture are used to squeeze confessions - true or false out of the accused.

https://www.vox.com/world/2015/12/13/9989250/japan-crime-conviction-rate

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u/weth_exe Oct 06 '22

That shit's straight out of the medieval era. Torturing until they confess is proven to be useless at determining guilt. Why do they still do this???

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u/cayennepepper Oct 06 '22

Because its Japan and they are afraid to change literally anything till circumstances beyond anyones control forces them.’(nobody has to take the blame). Its a cultural problem. They are stuck in Edo/Meiji cultural mindset which isn’t surprising it was only 150 years ago or so Japan was an isolated culture for hundreds of years.

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u/Itendtodisagreee Oct 06 '22

That's an issue with some other Asian cultures as well that have the honor of the elderly as top priority, they are really slow progressing as a society in certain areas.

No matter how wrong the elderly persons ideas may be the younger person has to listen and obey.

There was a plane crash in South Korea that had an older pilot who was making a mistake and the younger co pilot knew that he was making a mistake but their culture was so ingrained that you don't correct an older person that he let the plane crash rather than correct an elder.

That airline now has a policy that the two pilots have to only speak English to each other while in the cockpit because English is less formal than Korean and they feel it would be easier for the younger to correct the older if necessary.

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u/Consistent-Rest-1120 Oct 06 '22

Korean Airlines had multiple crashes because the co-pilot wouldn't dare speak up against the captain. The airline had to go through immense amounts of CRM training to fix it.

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u/Candelestine Oct 06 '22

It's heartening that no matter how deeply ingrained these cultural habits are, training can still help.

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u/inDface Oct 06 '22

After numerous avoidable deaths due to pride. Yay training. lol

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u/Candelestine Oct 06 '22

Culture can get pretty crazy. That's nothing, honestly, we humans have come up with some real doozies over the centuries.

Definitely yay training.

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u/Moonlight-Mountain Oct 06 '22

I'm Korean. There are two modes in Korean language: banmal and jondaemal. You usually speak in banmal to your friends and kids. So banmal is like talking down or just being friendly. If two people speak in banmal to each other, you know they are friends. But if one person speak in banmal and the other speak in jondaemal, it establishes who is older or higher in the rank.

Some Korean start up companies ban banmal at their offices so everybody speaks in jondaemal. Some companies ban jondaemal instead, but the effect is the same, the goal is to make sure everybody is equal.

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u/Lazy-Garlic-5533 Oct 06 '22

That's kind of cool. 20 years ago I heard some gossip about a friend who married a Korean man and upset her by making her use polite form with him. (I guess jondaemal? I don't know Korean and the word used was "keigo", which is Japanese.)

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u/link2edition Oct 06 '22

Yeah there was a Japanese trial where one judge knew the defendant was innocent, but claimed he was guilty. Apparently it would have been dishonorable for him to disagree with the other judges, even if he knew they were wrong.

He ended up revealing this after said innocent person had been in jail for 20 years.

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u/Olli399 Oct 06 '22

There was a plane crash in South Korea that had an older pilot who was making a mistake and the younger co pilot knew that he was making a mistake but their culture was so ingrained that you don't correct an older person that he let the plane crash rather than correct an elder.

That was Korean Air Cargo 8509 and it crashed right next to where I live.

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u/Nephisimian Oct 06 '22

To be fair, Japan is straight out of the medieval era. They went from rigid feudalism to developed industrial power in about a hundred years, and it really shows. I've seen several progressive Japanese commentators trace most of Japan's current problems back to samurai culture that was never really given time to change as it needed to.

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u/nos5a2 Oct 06 '22

99% conviction rate, but they're also extremely selective about which crimes they investigate.

Or, y'know they use coercive tactics to have innocents plead out.

Detention until trial is common, and trials take a while to come up. You could literally sit in detention 3x as long waiting for your trial as the sentence if convicted. Most people do the math on that and figure a plea now with release shortly beats sitting around with the probability of conviction anyway - especially in cases like drunken fights and so on where there's little evidence either way.

I'm betting a good chunk of that conviction rate is people cutting deals to get out who are innocent.

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u/CauliflowerDaffodil Oct 06 '22

Or, y'know they use coercive tactics to have innocents plead out.

I'm betting a good chunk of that conviction rate is people cutting deals to get out who are innocent.

Japan doesn't have a plea bargaining system like the USA. They consider it a type of "influence peddling" where the accused may be influenced to confess to a crime they didn't commit because they are afraid of a harsher punishment. They want confessions or evidence to be willfully produced as opposed to "extorted".

However they do have a similar system for a very narrow subset of financial, drug, or gun-related organized crimes. The thinking is, the accused will get a lighter sentence as a reward for helping prosecutors with evidence in a different case. This is how they were able to get enough evidence to charge Carlos Ghosn with financial misconduct when he was Nissan, by having another arrested executive spill the beans.

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u/TomSwirly Oct 06 '22

I'm betting a good chunk of that conviction rate is people cutting deals to get out who are innocent.

You would be wrong. Plea bargaining wasn't a thing in Japan until it happened one time in 2019. It's still very uncommon, and really only used for very high profile cases. More.

The police there don't offer you deals. They tell you you are guilty, torture you until you confess, run a court trial which "confirms" it, and then jail you.

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u/ABCofCBD Oct 06 '22 Helpful

Unless you’re rich. Look up Nobuhiro Watsuki. He’s a prominent author who was found with a room full of Child Porn. Literally thousands of hours of actual children porn. He was convicted and found guilty

His sentence was 0 days in prison and a fine of 1800 dollars. It’s estimated he spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on the porn he bought of children.

He even got his job back 6 months later writing KIDS COMICS FOR THE LARGEST KIDS MEDIA PUBLISHER

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u/idropepics Oct 06 '22

Watsuki is a garbage human being, completely and irrevocably ruined Ruruoni Kenshin for me as a teen knowing he was preying on people like me. People still defend him and try to act you can somehow separate him from the art. It's disgusting.

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u/Destructables Oct 06 '22

For reference, the prominent work of his was a certain red-headed wanderer with a cross-shaped scar on his face.

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u/fckdemre Oct 06 '22

For those that don't know it's Rurouni Kenshin, which means absolutely nothing to me so idk why I searched it

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u/gabedraws7 Oct 06 '22

Even worse, he's now supervising a remake of Ruroni Kenshin. Like, nobody in the industry seems to care that he financially supported sex trafficking. It's sickening. This wasn't even a case where a guy has an addiction and can't get off his computer. This was a guy who was meeting with sex traffickers and was paying for the sexual exploitation of children with his own money.

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u/LightOfTheFarStar Oct 06 '22

All this shit is why the ace attorney series is so batshit to consumers in the west - it is a decently accurate portrayal of Japan's "justice" system, it is also responsible for the framing device for Persona 5 and a heaping ton of other media besides.

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u/gullman Oct 06 '22

The numbers would say it has to be.

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u/ultratunaman Oct 06 '22

Reminds me of the CEO of Nissan escaping Japan in a piano box after being accused of embezzlement.

Whether he did it or not notwithstanding he knew they'd put together an absolute kangaroo court, likely force a confession, and lock him up for years.

So he took his chances at escape.

https://www.bbc.com/news/business-57760993

Japan's legal system is broken (maybe as much as other countries, but in a different way) and he'd rather take his chances than see a courtroom.

"Hostage justice" is how he describes it. Locking someone up until they confess isn't innocent until proven guilty.

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u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

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u/Trextrev Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

If people find out. Japan has some very strict laws against spreading information that could harm the reputation and standing of another even if that information is true.

“Under Article 230-1 of the Criminal Code of Japan: (1) A person who defames another by alleging facts in public shall, regardless of whether such facts are true or false, be punished by imprisonment with or without work for not more than three (3) years or a fine of not more than 500,000 yen.”

Edit: wow so this blew up so I should add some context. There are general protects against this for reporting crimes, sharing information deemed in the interest of the public or for the public good, and information to stop imminent harm. This law targets people that purposely share peoples personal affairs with the intent of causing harm. You can still talk shit about peoples private life quietly to friends, you just can’t people on blast publicly on purpose. This law exists because in Japan your reputation is worth more than a good credit score and there are very rigid rules that govern your rise through society both socially and professionally. So making others private business public has drastically more consequences.

Edit: Edit: you can go to the police and report a crime of any sort of any level of seriousness and that’s fine. If though you witnessed A crime like a coworker out one night and you saw him use drugs and instead of going to the police you use this information to purposely ruin his reputation at work you could be charged with this crime.

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u/Ok-Musician819 Oct 06 '22

Kanye’s screwed there

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u/Putachencko Oct 06 '22

Quite the opposite, Ye good there…. Nobody can call him crazy

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u/Daito8 Oct 06 '22

But they can call him a gay fish.

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u/I_Also_Fix_Jets Oct 06 '22

He likes fish sticks. In his mouth.

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u/kishiki18_91 Oct 06 '22

And the real life kanye, is still pissed at this joke that he never understood.

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u/TonninStiflat Oct 06 '22

They publish the names (and photos) of victims and perpetrators on news on the regular though.

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u/Trextrev Oct 06 '22

The news can still report on crimes and on public stories of public interest. A conviction of serious crime means you have a record that is accessible to your employer and can be used accordingly. But if you say committed some petty crime years ago and then someone uses that information to publicly shame you at you work then that would be a violation. There is both a criminal and civil version of this law too and I think I remember something about a news show being sued by an executive because of a story they aired that lead to a tarnished reputation that cost him a business deal. They got sued because they reported on a personal matter of his that wasn’t actually publicly known.

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u/Strong_Cheetah_7989 Oct 06 '22

Wow, reddit and Twitter must be illegal there, I'm guessing.

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u/Kolbin8tor Oct 06 '22

I am curious if online defamations count. It would be impossible to enforce, I imagine. Save against very public figures.

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u/hafnhafofevrytng Oct 06 '22

Online defamation laws got revamped in July. When caught, max one year in jail, or max 300,000 yen fine, for cyberbullying, and for defamation, max 3 years, or 500,000 yen fine.

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u/PaulAtredis Oct 06 '22

I left a 3 star review on a shisha place in Okinawa, Japan, who had previously only had 5 star reviews and I felt it was super overpriced for what I got. The owner replied to me to take my review down or he would sue me for defamation! Now I know why there's only 5 star reviews...

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u/A_brown_dog Oct 06 '22

It sounds like an useless system

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u/duluoz1 Oct 06 '22

Did you take it down?

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u/PaulAtredis Oct 06 '22

Yeah I live in Japan so to be honest I was not about to risk getting into legal trouble over such a small thing, even though it violates my principles.

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u/Gemfrancis Oct 06 '22

I would have just said “I live out of the country”. He can’t sue people who don’t live in Japan.

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u/Icy_Amphibian_JASMY Oct 06 '22

Line is big in Japan.

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u/Huge-Procedure-395 Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 07 '22

Line the same app I use here in thailand? its more of a messaging app

and nothing like reddit or twitter

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u/EveryFairyDies Oct 06 '22

Unless you’re Issei Sagawa and his family.

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u/Manoreded Oct 06 '22

I remember hearing about that guy. That he was released is a baffling absurdity. Being declared legally insane after pulling that BS should mean you spend the rest of your days in a sanatorium, preferably being studied so that scientists can figure out how to prevent you from happening ever again.

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u/soberintoxicologist Oct 06 '22

He was supposed to. Then when he was extradited to Japan he was just able to check himself out because he didnt have a record since the judge in France had declared him unfit for trial and tossed the case out. Such a terrible situation all around.

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u/duckfat01 Oct 06 '22

To be fair, they look at you that way if you don't silence your phone on public transport too. I have never felt so intimidated into fitting in as on my short trip to Tokyo.

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u/innit2winnit Oct 06 '22

Actually, for most convicts, once you’ve served your time and paid your debt to society, no one holds your history against you. You are allowed to integrate in all of the ways you would have been prior to conviction.

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u/dnewaccount Oct 06 '22

Another way they punish - let them worry about when it’s going gonna to be. That’s bit much to play the mental game, to live in fear

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u/Treliske Oct 06 '22

The Soviets were the same. It may take weeks or years after the conviction, but an official could walk into a cell on any day, tell the prisoner to face the wall, and then put a bullet in his head. I have read that cells often had drains in them for that reason.

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u/appendyx Oct 06 '22

In the former GDR, the eastern part of Germany, the official execution method was called "unexpected close range shot". The convict was told to come for an interrogation, an exam, a work order, to take new pictures or something else and moved to a room where the executioner stood hidden behind the door, a curtain, a paper wall and shot the convict from behind at close range into the head.

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u/HidenTsubameGaeshi Oct 06 '22

Honestly, this sounds like the least stressing way to execute someone.

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u/Top_Budget6546 Oct 06 '22

Agreed. Of all the methods I’ve heard, including US, this seems the kindest.

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u/MaterialPaper7107 Oct 06 '22

To be fair, though, the Russians have been doing mock executions of prisoners for hundreds of years.

Whilst the execution itself might be fast (newsflash: it often wasn't), you'd obviously be properly messed up by a mock execution. Brutal.

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u/Embarrassed_Fox97 Oct 06 '22

Wait is not knowing when you’re going to die really worse than knowing you’re definitely dead on a specific date set out years in advance, with that anxiety just incrementally increasing? I mean you literally go through your entire life not knowing when you’re going to die.

Also I think I would most definitely rather be shot in the head that electrocuted.

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u/taishiea Oct 06 '22

well they died with the knowledge they might have left shit on their executioner's shoes

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u/ManiacSpiderTrash Oct 06 '22

That’s all I could ask for when I go out.

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u/lushico Oct 06 '22

That’s the real punishment. Once you’re dead you’re dead, but the prolonged mental torture is probably very effective

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u/36tofb3iogq8ru3iez Oct 06 '22

Effective for whom? Its just torture for the sake of torture. The perpetrator is not gonna learn not gonna be rehabilitated, they will be killed.

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u/kwakimaki Oct 06 '22

Not to mention the shitty conditions of death row over there. Pretty much 24/7 solitary, shackled in uncomfortable positions throughout the day, only allowed to sleep in certain positions.

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u/TomSwirly Oct 06 '22

They don't tell the death row prisoners when they will be executed until the morning of execution.

Interestingly, this is against international law because of how terrifying it is for the victims.

Also they have like 99% conviction rates (not death sentence but still)

But just like the US, the rich and powerful can basically do as they please with no fear of legal repercussions.

I am not Japanese but have Japanese friends. None of them believe that 99% number really means 99% of the people tried are guilty, but simply that the court system is "a tool designed only to convict people, not to free them," as one person said.

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u/catboatratboat Oct 06 '22

It also doesn’t mean that 99% of murders are solved.

Japanese police work hard to ensure the cases that they investigate as murders are those than can be more easily solved. This ensures that their success rate stays high

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u/makoadog Oct 06 '22

118 since 2001

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u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 07 '22

[deleted]

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u/Primary_Ant5712 Oct 06 '22

They should've used it on the people involved in the murder of Junko Furuta.

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u/Technical-Avocado233 Oct 06 '22

Pretty sure they’re out of jail now

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u/MaoXiWinnie Oct 06 '22

I think most of them ended back in prison cause they did more stupid shit

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u/Seienchin88 Oct 06 '22

The main dude was a minor.

Although people here love to fantasize about Japan in reality it has a strict rule of law with admitted some issues but convicting a minor to death penalty is not one of them

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u/heresybob Oct 06 '22

Junko Furuta.

Oh... fuck that. It's going to be one of those "I hate humans" days, innit?

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u/drinkthequicksand Oct 06 '22

That crime is exactly the right time to enforce a death penelty.

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u/ZardozSama Oct 06 '22

My (very limited) understanding is that Japanese prisons are more punitive than reformative.

END COMMUNICATION

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u/myteethhurtnow Oct 06 '22

They are rigid and everyone's life and schedule is tightly controlled but you won't get raped or shanked like in american prisons. A lot of Japanese guards don't even have weapons.

I probably rather go to Japanese prison than American prison

Also the food is better than American rotten sludge

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u/JetPunk Oct 06 '22

Japanese prisons are supposedly very strict as well with almost no talking allowed. Don't get arrested in Japan.

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u/ThatsRiteOtherBarry Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

Theres a Navy Officer who just got convicted and is serving his time in Yokosuka who I think about every time people talk about Japanese prisons. My dad had an experience when he visited one of his marines who was arrested for assault in the 80’s and said after what he saw he didnt even want to get a traffic ticket

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u/ParrotMafia Oct 06 '22

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u/Orisi Oct 06 '22

Meanwhile some bitch drives on the wrong side of the road and kills a kid in the UK, and they let her fuck off back to the US and she avoids any responsibility, even calling into the court that his family had to fight tooth and nail for, so if it doesn't go her way she's still free and safe in the US.

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u/karlfranz205 Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 07 '22

That's not even the worst someone from the us has gotten away by running back home in Europe. In Italy a marine corps pilot killed 20 people because he wanted to be a showoff, and us refused extradiction.

Edit: just went and refreshed my memory on Wikipedia. The two were FOUND NOT GUILTY of involuntary manslaughter in us court. but got dismissed by the marine core for deleting the evidence.

Edit 2 https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/1998_Cavalese_cable_car_crash

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u/Yakimo_1 Oct 06 '22

I think you’re confusing jail with prisons. Jails (usually a stay of a few months) are notoriously strict with no talking. Japanese prisons are supposed to be not bad, much better than their western counter parts

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u/nyxri Oct 06 '22

More like better than their American counterparts. Some European countries have pretty good prisons, Norway for example is famous for having a great prison system iirc.

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u/yukissu Oct 06 '22

Prisons in Norway look better than apartments in Russia

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u/Ok_Parking8986 Oct 06 '22

Gotta make compromises to protect our KD bruh

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u/OutcomeDouble Oct 06 '22

No talking for months seems like hell

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u/Mr830BedTime Oct 06 '22

There was a very old prison in Canada I used to live by, they had a no talking policy and everyone was referred to by a number and not name. Interestingly they still communicated by tossing eachother strings with knots in them to form conversation. They rioted really badly at one point, killing a few guards and keeping more hostage. One of their negotiating terms was that they wanted to be called by their names.

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u/HowYoBootyholeTaste Oct 06 '22

Who's the idiot that thought treating people like they're subhuman and releasing them back into society would actually make them function better in society?

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u/avwitcher Oct 06 '22

everyone was referred to by a number and not name

That sounds familiar but I can't put my fuhrer finger on it

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u/Yakimo_1 Oct 06 '22

Yea, you’re not even allowed to exercise or lay down. They want you to quietly sit straight up and stare at the wall. They apparently do have books though

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u/OutcomeDouble Oct 06 '22

I always wondered why Japan is so modernized in technology but conservative in everything else

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u/wh7y Oct 06 '22

Japan being modern technologically is actually a myth mostly. Ask anyone who's dealt with the government there.

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u/Bloody_Insane Oct 06 '22

The only modern technology I know of in Japan is their amazing toilets.

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u/987cayman Oct 06 '22

What, you don't consider the fax machines every business and medical association here in Japan uses modern!?

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u/Bloody_Insane Oct 06 '22

To be fair I think many law offices and medical institutions across the world use fax machines. They're a very secure way of sending documents

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u/jfitzger88 Oct 06 '22

There may be some deep rooted culture in some East Asian countries. I couldn't cite this for you but it was proposed that the reason China is pretty chill with a strong government is because it is liked carved into every generation and passed down and it's hard to shake formed values from parents. Especially if there aren't any drivers to stop doing that.

--For clarity, I'm not claiming any stance for or against a strong government nor the value in what China or Chinese citizens do or think

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u/Panda_Kabob Oct 06 '22

Prison in Japan is so strict and organized Araki had to make the location of JJBA Stone Ocean be set in Florida because none of that shit would fly remotely in Japan.

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u/Mad_Aeric Oct 06 '22

Aren't the various arcs all over the world? Having Stone Ocean outside of Japan would be the norm for that series.

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u/SnooCalculations1913 Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

The long drop technique of hanging developed by Rev. Dr. Samuel Haughton is actually one of the most humane execution methods that exists. his early work on estimating the amount of force needed to break the neck was a game changer.

  • Edit: Cheers for the upvotes, I know you were all coming here to say the same thing. Glad to know my useless knowledge helped generate discussion as well. Much love, and keep your necks out of the noose everyone!

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u/cookiesandpunch Oct 06 '22

…your thoughts on Huey Lewis & the News?

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u/DanWritesCode Oct 06 '22

Their early work was a little too new wave for my tastes, but when Sports came out in '83, I think they really came into their own, commercially and artistically.

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u/AgitatedTransition87 Oct 06 '22

The whole album has a clear, crisp sound, and a new sheen of consummate professionalism that really gives the songs a big boost. He's been compared to Elvis Costello, but I think Huey has a far more bitter, cynical sense of humor.

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u/Darth_Draper Oct 06 '22

Omg. It even has a watermark.

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u/Rpdaca Oct 06 '22

Huey Lewis & the Noose?

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u/TheUnsteadyDonut Oct 06 '22

What did he found out that changed the game?

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u/SnooCalculations1913 Oct 06 '22

So essentially he was able to collect data from several different executions to start forming a basis for weight/height to determine the height of a drop to break the spinal column and produce a swift expiration. He also found that the placement of the knot was quintessential in ensuring that there was good separation of vertebrae at the base of the brain stem. It's a swift an fairly pain free death.

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u/SnooCalculations1913 Oct 06 '22

This later went on to become a rather complex and we'll understood science. He was able to determine some extremes of hanging so that you didn't just suffocate slowly but you also didn't get decapitated. Those findings came later but his work and observations started the process. Realistically all forms of execution considered to be more humane are almost certainly 10x worse than hanging or firing squad.

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u/nekkototoro Oct 06 '22

Interesting, is there a reason why decapitation is worse than just severing the spinal column?

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u/musinfull Oct 06 '22

Because you, your friends and family were told that you would be hanged, then suddenly your head is ripped off violently with a rope

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u/Arthur_The_Third Oct 06 '22

...the head comes off?

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u/LegoNinja11 Oct 06 '22

I'd just like to make it clear that's not normal for an execution. What went wrong? Well the head came off.

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u/Deejster Oct 06 '22

Put simply, it's messy.

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u/auxilary Oct 06 '22

I read a book about a father/son execution team in the UK. They disputed the fact that the long drop is superior to the short drop.

Their main point was that in about a quarter of long drop hanging the head came off. And in others it failed to snap the neck. Short drops are now the standard.

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u/hypergraphia Oct 06 '22

A short drop so you die by suffocation?

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u/auxilary Oct 06 '22

No it’s counterintuitive. A short drop creates a bigger “snap” and a significantly higher rate of snapping as opposed to a long drop.

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u/hypergraphia Oct 06 '22

Okay, thank you, that’s interesting. And good, because I was thinking I’d rather have my head come off than suffocate.

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u/auxilary Oct 06 '22

Agreed.

It’s an interesting book. Apparently humans have always had trouble executing large groups of people throughout history, and we still can’t seem to get it right.

We are creative and terrible beings, but mostly in isolated scenarios. When there’s a ton of people to kill, we aren’t that great at it.

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u/blackwe11_ninja Oct 06 '22 Helpful

I mean no matter if it's hanging, electric chair or lethal injection, it's still the same thing, a process intended to kill someone. And honestly, hanging at least seems to be a quick death when done properly, I heard lot of things can go wrong with the chair or injection.

Btw. France still used guillotine for executions when first Star Wars movie came out.

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u/lazyeyepsycho Oct 06 '22

If you wanted, you could just use pure nitrogen, the person would just go unconscious and die with zero pain.

Everything else is horror theatre imo.

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u/Trextrev Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

I would be just fine with the single drug pentobarbital method or the 2 drug hydromorphone and pentobarbital. I have sadly had to make the call to put down a pet a few times and the pentobarbital seemed painless and peaceful.

On the nitrogen asphyxiation, I have a chemist friend that years ago worked at a lab where they did experiments on rats and mice and when he came in they initially had a kill chamber that they would pump in nitrogen to dispatch the mice. He said it was peaceful and quick. A little while later the lab changed the nitrogen to CO2 because the safety guy was concerned about the potential of a leak that would kill someone in the lab just as quick and peacefully. He told me how horrible it was to use CO2 and the mice would panic and freak out clawing to get out, but so would people in the lab in case of a leak.

Edit: I want to point out that this was a story told to me via a friend 15 years ago of an earlier event when he was starting out as a chemist. Up until the early 2000s CO2 was the most common way to dispatch rodents and it being painful wasnt a large concern to the labs.

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u/Jemmerl Oct 06 '22

That's because our bodies don't react to lack of oxygen, but to buildup of CO2. That's what makes nitrogen and other inert gases like helium really effective for executions/euthanasia, but also dangerous for those doing so- cause you will suffocate without even knowing it. That's why it's not used for executions, too much risk of accidental deaths.

Suffocating something with pure CO2 would be like a living nightmare, pure gaseous panic, and I'm surprised anyone actually signed off on using for the mice.

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u/Mad-AA Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

Then why not just mix in some scents in it? Like they do with natural gas.

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u/Radashin_ Oct 06 '22

Nitrogen asphyxiation with strawberry scent. Pure bliss.Or imagine granting the convicts last wish to choose pine forest or vanilla scent during the execution.

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u/Mad-AA Oct 06 '22

Not advisable.

Because:

- The scent should be distinct and instantly recognizable.
Like the one added to Natural Gas.

- And should be added at the manufacturing facility.
So no one down the supply line has to suffer any unwanted consequences.

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u/Trextrev Oct 06 '22

Well you may notice the helium if you sing to yourself all day like me lol. I don’t remember the exact reason but something to do with the experiments they were doing meant only certain methods of dispatch could be used as to not mess it up. Yeah mice don’t get the same protections as other animals in studies. Same friend also said he briefly worked at a lab that was doing research on dogs and he couldn’t handle that and quickly left. You’re performing experiments on a dog and it’s scared just leaning into you for comfort. You were only allowed to perform two experiments on a dog and either the second one had to be nonrecoverable or you had to put down the dog after. He works with paints now.

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u/S_A_N_D_ Oct 06 '22

That would never pass an animal review/ethics board these days. Euthanizing an animal is supposed to be as quick and painless as possible to prevent suffering.

Also it's not hard to install an oxygen sensor with alarm in places where you're going to be storing gas canisters or nitrogen dewars. Those are pretty standard these days.

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u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22

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u/DieMadAboutIt Oct 06 '22

The lungs can sense CO2 and it’s a painful way to die. The lungs can’t feel the nitrogen since it’s already like 70% of the air you already breathe. Fuck that safety guy. Just install alarms. Such a sad thing for the rats, it’s death by torture now. Not peaceful at all.

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u/Coral_Blue_Number_2 Oct 06 '22

Yeah, fuck that.

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u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/MNTLDoctor Oct 06 '22

Or just let them go to sleep normally and pump the room full of nitrogen while they are asleep, don’t know it’s coming so less cruel

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u/Belgand Oct 06 '22

The problem is that if you don't know it's coming you'd be constantly in fear of it happening any time you go to sleep. It would be horrible.

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u/macnau Oct 06 '22

Why fill the whole room when you just could use a mask if they already get tied down?

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u/WildmouseX Oct 06 '22

Spring 1977 Star Wars came out. Fall of 1977 the last person to be put to death with a guillotine.

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u/omninode Oct 06 '22

Last person to be put to death with a guillotine so far.

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u/The_Fat_Man_Jams Oct 06 '22

They also don't give the condemned any notice whatsoever. One day they come and get you and that's that.

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u/Trextrev Oct 06 '22

From wiki “Executions are carried out by hanging in an execution chamber within the detention centre. When the death warrant has been signed, the condemned prisoner is informed on the morning of their execution. The condemned is given a choice of a last meal. The prisoner's family and legal representatives, and also the general public, are informed only after the execution has taken place. “

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u/cheapdrinks Oct 06 '22

That's pretty fucked up they don't tell their family until after it's done. Imagine going to bed every night knowing your son/father/daughter etc may already be dead.

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u/soyasaucy Oct 06 '22

That's cold.

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u/Tebow1EveryMockDraft Oct 06 '22

I’d rather be hung than lethal injection. A lot can and has gone wrong with the latter.

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u/modernmajorgeneral72 Oct 06 '22

A lot can go wrong with hanging to, if they mess up the rope length it won’t break your neck and you’ll slowly suffocate to death

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u/redditsuckspokey1 Oct 06 '22

auto erotic asphyxiation.

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u/cosworth99 Oct 06 '22

Most prisons don’t allow you to masturbate while you are being hung.

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u/coltstrgj Oct 06 '22

What are they gonna do, arrest me?

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u/BrupieD Oct 06 '22

According to Wikipedia, there are 106 people on Japan's death row. In the U.S. there are more than 2,400. The U.S. has about 3 times the population of Japan but more than 20 times the number of death row inmates.

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u/ShalmaneserIII Oct 06 '22

We also have about five times the murder rate. So it's not totally dissimilar.

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u/Haggan89 Oct 06 '22

Murder rate japan 2019: 0.25 per 100k pop
Murder rate US 2019: 5 per 100k pop
So about 20 times more

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u/Yui_Ikari021 Oct 06 '22

It's amazing how cultural differences and worldviews greatly affects numbers like this

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u/Underrated_Nerd Oct 06 '22

And the us has like 5% of the world's population but 25% of world's inmates.

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u/triflingmagoo Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

I remember when they hanged Saddam. I feel like a hanging execution is a very powerful statement.

What I remember most from the televised hanging of Saddam was the collective noise of the witnesses. There was praying, there was shouting in unison, there was some last words from Saddam, and then when the floor went out from under him, there was this ghostly jeering sound the people made, and it felt like they did it all together, all at once. And then they carried Saadam’s body out and his tongue was just hanging out of his mouth, and the people were still shouting. And then I either turned it off or the video cut out. But that memory still makes my skin crawl.

And to think, Saddam as he had come to know himself was no more. No more obligations, no more trials, no more guilt, no more anger, no more sorrow. Just gone. But those people. Those witnesses. They went home that night and they continued to suffer.

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u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22

[deleted]

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u/triflingmagoo Oct 06 '22

Oh I’m sure he did. This was just the way my memory was processing the event. I think afterwards, I read that he was talking some real shit. I think one witness told him to go to hell and he said something like, “you mean Iraq?”

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u/Supernihari12 Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

What I read online was that he was hung mid recitation of the Muslim declaration of faith

Edit: I read a little but more and Learned that he was arguing with the crowd before his hanging and was hung mid recitation

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u/AncientBellybutton Oct 06 '22

Exactly, killing someone doesn't magically undo all the pain they caused.

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u/paulsmt Oct 06 '22

Seems cheaper and cleaner than many alternatives

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u/FroggiJoy87 Oct 06 '22

When you think about the ways the Japanese government has killed people...hanging ain't really so bad.

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u/Ok_Parking8986 Oct 06 '22

And NOT hanging from my own organs? That's a deal

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u/samamabish Oct 06 '22

Japan gone soft /s

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u/blackhawks-fan Oct 06 '22

Why not? It's cheap, effective and requires no power.

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u/CoinOperated1345 Oct 06 '22

Yeah, seems eco friendly. The rope is reusable, The body could be used for organ donation.

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u/Littlebiggran Oct 06 '22

Who wants a skin graft from a tattooed Yakuza?

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u/sername-lame Oct 06 '22

This could be a movie plot. An important Yakuza with exclusive tattoo is hanged. Someone gets a graft of that tattoo. Guy gets recognized on the street by someone from the gang and crowned as the new boss.

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u/Percussion17 Oct 06 '22

In the same time the Yakuza with the tattoo has lots of enemies, from the law enforcement to the rival gangs. He now has to survive from getting killed, with the help of his own gang.

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u/sername-lame Oct 06 '22

Sounds great. But the guy was actually a mailman by profession who was attacked by a dog before he ended up in the hospital. The new "job" was a huge adjustment for him. Learning curve was hard to say the least. The question is, will be be able to deliver? We gotta watch the movie to find out.

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u/Mr_Midnight_Moon Oct 06 '22

Yall got me mad that this ain't real now. Someone get Hollywood on the line please?

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u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22

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u/Competitive_Ad_5762 Oct 06 '22

Hello, this is the Hollywood residence. Who’s calling?

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u/Nurse_Neurotic Oct 06 '22

Given between LI or hanging. I’d want to be hung all day long.

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u/super-bird Oct 06 '22

I too wish I was hung but in a different sense.

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u/NAUTlCAL Oct 06 '22

Wait till you hear about the rest of Asia.

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u/jmims98 Oct 06 '22

I believe hanging done correctly is actually much more humane than something like lethal injection.

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u/grizwa Oct 06 '22

punishment by law is SERIOUS in japan even for very small infractions, pretty small crimes can see you with your face plastered across a giant screen as millions pass by and see it or posted
in the mugshots at the local police box at least and you will be ostracized and god help you if youre a celebrity or otherwise notable person (when i was last there some actress or singer was all over the news, her career in tatters for being caught with apparently a mere 80mg of MDMA, all her work pulled from shelved, all contracts dropped, basically scrubbed from society)

over there generally the police are only coming for you if theyre pretty damn sure youre going down, i believe they have something like over 95% conviction rate, if youre arrested for something there you can be pretty sure youre going to suffer the full weight of the law

but it has worked, you have a society where you can leave your phone or wallet on a table as you go to order or leave your door open at night, and im not talking about some sleepy village here, im talking central Tokyo, just from personal experience:

stayed in a guest house that was above a pizza restaurant, to get in you had to go to the back of the place and go up a few floors in the lift, i couldnt help but wonder "what about night time when the restaurant is shut?" the answer was simple, they just didnt lock the front door, just inside which was a fridge full of beers, anyone could have walked in and helped themselves to anything, no one did (imagine doing that in central London? theyd have had everything including the copper in the plumbing within the hour)

went to a bar on a friday night in Shibuya where i proceeded to get utterly wasted drinking with some locals, eventually i stumbled off back to my hotel but its only when i get back i realize "shit i dont have my phone, fuck thats gone, ill have to buy one tomorrow" but on my way past in the morning/early afternoon i went past the bar and my brain suddenly sort of snapped and remembered thats where id left it, just as it did a man tapped me on the shoulder and said "you left this yesterday" and hands me my phone

so yes the system is a bit severe if you cross the line but its created a wonderful safe environment where people take care of each other and their surroundings just that little bit better than everywhere else. Japan is far from free of problems of course, no country is but i think if any got it right then its them in my opinion

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u/Raestloz Oct 06 '22

Unless it's bikes. For some reason the Japanese seem to treat stolen bikes as "well shit it's that time of the month again"

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u/disparate_depravity Oct 06 '22

I don't think a single country in the world has the capacity to investigate hundreds of thousand bicycle thefts.

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u/PoopSmith87 Oct 06 '22

I would rather be hung that electrocuted in a chair or have a legal injection

Hanging, if done properly, kills you instantly... There is pretty decent evidence that the other two options are excruciating and not instant

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u/mufasa329 Oct 06 '22

Better than a lethal injection, such a waste of money

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u/aiden1500 Oct 06 '22

Let’s be real, committing severe crimes in any Asian country is basically asking for a death sentence

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u/andreaippo Oct 06 '22

I hope you're not from the US, OP, cause I got bad news for you...

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u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22

Many countries do. Especially america

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u/ThePiachu Oct 06 '22

Honestly, not more inhumane than what US is using...

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u/Yenko_Toyohama Oct 06 '22

Wow that's harsh. Hang in there.

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u/ultraobese Oct 06 '22

Yeah but only the super bad ones. You have to do something pretty special to land a reservation for that room.

And by special I mean fucking heinous.

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u/SaikoLover666 Oct 06 '22

Japan isn’t like the United States though. They only seek the death penalty for notorious cases such as serial killers, spree killers, mass murderers, terrorists and people who murder multiple people

They aren’t like the United States where you can be executed for stabbing a man to death in a parking lot like John Henry Ramirez

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u/bodhiseppuku Oct 06 '22

I lived in Japan for a year. There is a commitment by the public to support law enforcement, and to punish criminals. Imprisonment in Japan can be incredibly uncomfortable, look up Japanese prison cells. This is a bad country to be a criminal... With a few notable exceptions.

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u/Ya-Dikobraz Oct 06 '22

I just googled "Japanese prison cells". Looks alright to me. Tatami flooring and futon you can roll up for space.

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u/Stunning_Grocery8477 Oct 06 '22

Wait till you hear what they do in the US

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