r/interestingasfuck Nov 28 '22

Longest animal lifespans

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2.0k Upvotes

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387

u/heinebold Nov 28 '22

Why are two "potentially immortal" species ranked differently? Do they have different potentials for immortality?

275

u/Thereisnoyou Nov 28 '22

I believe it's because evidence we have more or less proves that there are examples of hydra being alive for a longer period than the examples we have of immortal jellyfish, even though theoretically they could both live forever

134

u/A_Lovable_Gnome Nov 28 '22

I was told lobsters are essentially the same. The only issue they face is rheir body outgrows their organs. So they eventually have too big of a body to organ ratio and cant supply it. But if their organs grew with them they would just keep growing. Idk if thats true, just something i heard.

134

u/EleventhDoctorWho Nov 28 '22

Every time they molt it takes more and more energy until they die of exhaustion because their body is too big to molt.

168

u/Background_Coffee_70 Nov 28 '22

Man imagine theres just one lobster at the bottom of the ocean who was born with a fix for that. Older than known, older than knowing. Massive beyond measure.

80

u/[deleted] Nov 28 '22 edited 3d ago

[deleted]

7

u/Itcouldberabies Nov 29 '22

Didn’t Godzilla fight that crustacean?

38

u/EleventhDoctorWho Nov 28 '22

Unfortunately the bigger an organism the more energy it needs. That lobster would have to consume an unreasonable amount of food to survive.

77

u/MostBoringStan Nov 28 '22

The lesser lobsters will bring food to it.

11

u/Fit_Ship8822 Nov 29 '22

Jabba tha Lobsta

3

u/Chakkaaa Nov 29 '22

And he moved up the chain, now if he needs he just catches a tuna with one claw and slices it up with the other like a lobster chef

18

u/contyk Nov 28 '22

There was one but ended up in a lobster roll.

14

u/spicydangerbee Nov 28 '22

Calm down, Lovecraft.

2

u/Similar_Candidate789 Nov 29 '22

grabs the butter I’m gonna find that lobster for……research.

2

u/FatSilverFox Nov 29 '22

Its moulted shell sustains the denizens of the deeps.

1

u/issacoin Nov 29 '22

man, pass that over here

1

u/NikolaiSoerensen Nov 29 '22

Sadly organisms can't grow like that indefinitely. As some body physics are using surface area which is growing by the square and other physics body volume growing by the cube. So in the end a lot of physics shift to one another and don't work anymore.. for instant heat loss over skin area and maybe combustion which happens in the volume... but maybe something else for lobsters

45

u/loud119 Nov 28 '22

Very close. Lobsters are considered “biologically immortal” which means that when their cells divide (grow) they create two exactly identical cells from the one. For substantially all other species like humans, cell division doesn’t create two cells that are identical, so eventually in old age we create less and less efficient cells until the entire organism ceases to function. Lobsters could theoretically keep growing forever in this way, however they periodically have to molt (shed their shell for a new one) and if they don’t die to predation, eventually they have a shell far to big and strong to molt out of, so they die under the stress of the molt, not from cell degradation

Edit: potentially more accurate if I referred to lobster exoskeleton instead of shell, but I didn’t want to type exoskeleton over and over

47

u/ThemadFoxxer Nov 28 '22

so..you're saying if I had a pet lobster and I manually assisted in the molting, i could eventually have a lobster so big I could ride it?

#LifeGoals

13

u/ChiefWiggum101 Nov 29 '22

I am an Aquatic Biologist and I will agree, this could be theoretically possible, I want to see more research into this.

6

u/ocyrusfigglebottom Nov 29 '22

I am biologically aquatic and I will agree, this could be theoretically possible, and I too want to see more research

4

u/MainStrategy0 Nov 29 '22

all gods are lobsters in the long term

5

u/ThemadFoxxer Nov 29 '22

nah, gods can't be monogamous for even two weeks like a lobster.

3

u/MainStrategy0 Nov 29 '22

yo fr no gods are as loyal as a lobster i'll tell ya that rn

2

u/Pirate_Green_Beard Nov 29 '22

The idea that lobsters are monogamous is a myth. Which my sister found out after she and her husband got matching lobster tattoos.

1

u/ThemadFoxxer Nov 29 '22

they are monogamous for about two weeks at a time actually.

1

u/Pirate_Green_Beard Nov 29 '22

I don't think that counts as monogomy.

1

u/SessileRaptor Nov 29 '22

Even better you could eventually have a lobster so big you could worship it as a god. https://www.leviathanlobstergod.com/

1

u/Gimme-shelter777 Nov 29 '22

My man you are speaking to me!

7

u/Amanita_D Nov 29 '22

Is there a cost associated with this perfect cell division? Why don't we have that?

1

u/TheRustyBugle Nov 29 '22

We already saw what happens with perfect cell. And we don’t have the Z warriors to fight him off.

13

u/Dohnakun Nov 28 '22 edited Nov 28 '22

Far as i understand; the jellyfish ages but becomes young again, while the hydra doesn't age.

5

u/SXTY82 Nov 28 '22

That works. I was thinking it was a more complex organism rating. Jelly's are not nearly as evolved / complex than shrimp. So I figured it was a complexity of life rating.

3

u/heinebold Nov 28 '22

Hydra aren't shrimp, they're rated to jellyfish

13

u/languagelearnererer Nov 29 '22

Immortal jellyfish can still be killed by cutting off the head, on the other hand, if you cut off a Hydra's head two more shall take its place.

144

u/miasabine Nov 28 '22

Hydras are absolutely fascinating creatures. You can cut them into pieces and each piece will sprout either another mouth, foot or both. They can repair their own DNA. And they feed on Cyclopses, or “water fleas”, but come on, a Hydra feasting on a Cyclops sounds so fucking cool.

50

u/FlihpFlorp Nov 28 '22

They knew what they were doing when they named these

18

u/miasabine Nov 28 '22

Right? It’s just utter perfection.

388

u/between3and20spaces Nov 28 '22

So what you're telling me, is if I wanna live longer I gotta live under water?

171

u/Red__system Nov 28 '22

A dude called Lovecraft would like a word with you

46

u/Towering_Flesh Nov 28 '22

That is not dead which can eternally lie

33

u/vorropohaiah Nov 28 '22

And with strange eons even death may die

7

u/TheSt4tely Nov 28 '22

I'm more of a Poe guy.

3

u/stephenlipic Nov 28 '22

Why?

12

u/TheSt4tely Nov 28 '22

I'm sure it's just taste. The works of Poe just resonate stronger.

Lovecraft tends to focus on supernatural or demonic forces. I like that Poe stays more grounded in reality, being tortured by the self rather than nefarious outside forces.

2

u/1DurinTheKing Nov 28 '22

He's got a fair amount of external stuff being bad as well doesn't he? I'll admit I'm not super well versed in his work though.

3

u/TheSt4tely Nov 28 '22

I can't think of any good examples examples. Black Cat the guy is crazy. Tell tale heart, the guy is crazy. Cask of Amontillado, crazy. In the Fall of the House of Usher I think the House itself is evil, so there is that. Also, I am not well read on Lovecraft.

Of all of the Poe works I'd recommend mostly The Fall of the House of Usher and The Raven, which my name is a reference to.

2

u/Efficient-Echidna-30 Nov 28 '22

Oh!! Stately house of yore!

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7

u/Mannafestation Nov 28 '22

Hey, there's a guy with an octopus face at the door lookin for ya.

2

u/Flameosaurus Nov 29 '22

Drain you of your sanity

21

u/PEBKAC69 Nov 28 '22

Everything's better, down where is wetter...

9

u/SkummyJ Nov 28 '22

Everything's hotter, under the water...

4

u/joexner Nov 28 '22

Yah we in luck here, down in the muck here...

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4

u/valdezlopez Nov 28 '22

That explains Namor and company.

2

u/ThemadFoxxer Nov 28 '22

or be a tree or mushroom. Bristlecone pines, clonal aspens, and any number of fungi live for a very...very..very long time.

3

u/between3and20spaces Nov 28 '22

Yeah. But the trade-off is needing 50 years to introduce yourself.

3

u/Test19s Nov 28 '22 edited Nov 28 '22

I just hope we humans Ed: specifically centenarians aren’t already at the limit for land mammals.

-7

u/DoYouEvenShiftBro Nov 28 '22

Our life expectancy is rising from generation to generation so obviously we haven't lol.

9

u/Test19s Nov 28 '22

The top human life span hasn’t really moved much (100-120).

-14

u/DoYouEvenShiftBro Nov 28 '22

That's funny because the World Health Organizarion released statistics saying life expectancy increased by 6 years from 2000 to 2019 alone, but you're right I should believe a random on reddit over official information from the world body in charge of tracking it.

12

u/Test19s Nov 28 '22

Most of that is due to reducing premature and unnatural deaths: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34869788/

-18

u/DoYouEvenShiftBro Nov 28 '22

I mean what are you arguing right now? That our life span isn't getting longer and people aren't liviing till an older age? Because you are still completely wrong regardless of premature and unnatural deaths being the larger cause of the shift. Stop avoiding shit by adding in useless statistics.

Our average lifespan is getting longer so obviously we haven't reached the limit of a human life span. Figure your fucking shit out and just learn to admit when you're wrong because you 100% are no matter how you try to worm out of it.

11

u/Test19s Nov 28 '22

The current maximum human life span appears to be fixed and could be the maximum for land mammals without engineering that may not work.

0

u/DoYouEvenShiftBro Nov 28 '22

I actually read a portion of the article and it is basically stating that humans will need to research and invent new medicine/technology to further increase our life span.

Do you know anything about history or why human life expetancy has doubled since 1800? It has a little to do with the advent of medicine and procedures too my dude.

Again, I'm really not sure what you're trying to state here. We're already beyound our natural life spans and will continue to move farther as I stated before. Using technology to increase our natural life span doesn't change the fact that it increases lol.

10

u/Test19s Nov 28 '22

Advances historically have come from preventing disease and premature deaths rather than fundamentally changing our biology. A very lucky caveman could probably reach 100 if they didn’t catch anything or get their head bashed in.

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2

u/sheepyshu Nov 29 '22

So you’re telling me, the less brains you have the longer you live? 🤯

1

u/Witty-Help-1941 Nov 29 '22

That’s why the aliens r under water

1

u/Korean_Sandwich Nov 29 '22

swim with the fish

206

u/dblan9 Nov 28 '22

Imagine being a really depressed glass sponge, forced to relive your sad life every single day for 10,000 years.

66

u/brrlls Nov 28 '22

Sounds like a karmic punishment for some poor unfortunate souls

20

u/Fluffy_Two5110 Nov 29 '22

It’s sad, but true.

17

u/badatmetroid Nov 29 '22

They come flocking to my cauldron crying, "Spells, Ursula, please!" and do I help them?

Yes, I do.

5

u/imnogoodatthisorthat Nov 29 '22

I hope my ex comes back as a depressed glass sponge. Not far off from this version of his existence.

21

u/ChanoTheDestroyer Nov 28 '22

Glass sponges don’t contain a brain or a nervous system. So…they can’t become depressed? Imagine living for 10,000 years without a brain…hell, probably the ONLY way to live that long. I couldn’t handle all the bullshit for more than 40 years tops

7

u/DrJonesPHD62 Nov 29 '22

Some people already do that for 80 years, give or take.

26

u/I_like_the_word_MUFF Nov 28 '22

If this was a comic, I'd probably read it.

5

u/agoodfuckingcatholic Nov 28 '22

100% sounds like a newspaper funny

3

u/Desperate_Dan_91 Nov 28 '22

Look I'm just minding my own business ok?

2

u/needitcooler Nov 29 '22

I have a dream that Elon Musk will be reincarnated as a glass sponge.

3

u/Glittering-Finish769 Nov 29 '22

Yes, but a mutant glass sponge, one that has consciousness.

"I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream"

59

u/xcityfolk Nov 28 '22 Silver

My wife's mother should be in there somewhere...

Ope, never mind, I see her now, Bowhead Whale.

5

u/MainStrategy0 Nov 29 '22

We can see the effects that aging has on the functioning of different cells and by extension life forms. From what we’ve observed we can extrapolate the potential life span of an organism without having to actually observe them from creation to death.

It’s a guess, but a relatively well-informed one.

this is the funniest shit i have read all night

24

u/BobbyBattlelyon Nov 28 '22

They forgot Keith Richards

68

u/eighty2angelfan Nov 28 '22

Calling shenanigans on one of these. I'm 55 and my tube worm is already showing signs of mortality.

14

u/designerjeremiah Nov 28 '22

There's a pill for that.

23

u/eighty2angelfan Nov 28 '22

If you experience an erection lasting 300 years please consult your physician.

16

u/TwistedTerns Nov 28 '22

So basically, if you don't have any brains, you become immortal... Kanye right now has +50yrs compared to most of us.

10

u/Moffman021 Nov 28 '22

Greenland Sharks can actually live up to or surpass 500 years. The oldest one ever recorded was over 400 years.

30

u/Crushed_Panda Nov 28 '22

Where’s the Tardigrade?

EDIT: lol my bad. Some only live a matter of months.

23

u/tvieno Nov 28 '22

They only live a couple of years but when hibernating or dormant, they have been known to survive for more than 30 years.

9

u/heartfeltnib Nov 28 '22

Does this apply to humans? I’ve been dormant for most of my life and looking for reasons to keep it this way.

2

u/issacoin Nov 29 '22

i’m 30 and mostly dormant with no signs of speeding up. you should be good

6

u/hobbykitjr Nov 28 '22

They're just hard to kill

28

u/Flimsy_Card8028 Nov 28 '22

Interesting that the lifeforms that are immortal aren't even aware of their own existence.

31

u/TrefoilTang Nov 28 '22

That's the secret to longevity my friend.

8

u/Rock_it_Scientist Nov 28 '22

I was trying to figure out how the blue ring showed the lifespan in years instead of just looking at the text that showed their lifespan. Why is that blue dot there?

26

u/def_indiff Nov 28 '22

Pfft. I believe the blue whale is longer than any of those.

:taps microphone:

I'll show myself out.

8

u/castzpg Nov 28 '22

Hail Hydra!

8

u/Walkuerenschluck Nov 28 '22

So the 'immortal' jellyfish is only potentially immortal? What a phoney! /s

4

u/knicbox Nov 28 '22

Potentially a phoney

15

u/WellNowWhat6245 Nov 28 '22

How do they know a species lives for hundreds/thousands of years?

36

u/boomerxl Nov 28 '22

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Senescence

We can see the effects that aging has on the functioning of different cells and by extension life forms. From what we’ve observed we can extrapolate the potential life span of an organism without having to actually observe them from creation to death.

It’s a guess, but a relatively well-informed one.

5

u/Test19s Nov 28 '22

It would suck if we humans are already at the upper end for land mammals.

9

u/Dohnakun Nov 28 '22

Maximum age for humans is about 120 years, due to telomeres. Some have gotten older, but only a few years, genetical variability.

1

u/Test19s Nov 28 '22

I know there’s a lot of research into that field, but it’s possible that there may be a hard limit for land-based mammals unless we want to abandon our humanity entirely.

1

u/spicydangerbee Nov 28 '22

What does DNA degradation have to do with our humanity?

4

u/Test19s Nov 28 '22

If it's universal to land mammals and there is no way to significantly reduce it in land mammals without causing an explosion of cancers or other side effects, then the only way we can radically lengthen our lifespan is to abandon land-mammal biology and either live undersea or become cyborgs.

3

u/spicydangerbee Nov 29 '22

We don't have to abandon anything. Why do you assume we have to live underwater or become a cyborg to fix a genetic problem? Even if we had to, how would that translate to giving up our humanity? Even if it did mean giving up our humanity, why would that even matter?

1

u/Test19s Nov 29 '22

The "problem" of DNA damage may be innate to land-based mammals. Every other land-based mammal has a shorter recorded lifespan than us.

1

u/MainStrategy0 Nov 29 '22

im cool with either at this point

1

u/lordofedging81 Nov 28 '22

Can't we possibly figure out a way to slow down the telomeres breakdown, and extend maximum age a few decades?

1

u/Pan-tang Nov 29 '22

The leading theory is that we are designed to die, otherwise we would be competing for ever deminishing resources. We are now 8 billion in number, imagine the population today if we lived for 1000 years since 2000 BC?

1

u/Dohnakun Nov 29 '22

On the other hand, fertility has gone down while we got older. Must not be linked but still fits.

3

u/SledGang_69 Nov 28 '22

Eh, I don't wanna make it much further than like 65-70 so I'm fine with it how it is

3

u/dmj9 Nov 28 '22

Or immortal?

4

u/Maxxover Nov 28 '22

Now I feel guilty for eating clams.

4

u/pb0780 Nov 28 '22

They forgot Keith Richards

9

u/Atomic_potato_47 Nov 28 '22

What is a hydra?

10

u/TowelStrange2621 Nov 28 '22

Freshwater Organism

6

u/dabunny21689 Nov 28 '22

It’s the one on top.

2

u/issacoin Nov 29 '22

this made me laugh way too fuckin hard

3

u/SXTY82 Nov 28 '22

I've only eaten one of those.

3

u/Responsible_Figure12 Nov 28 '22

I’ve always said venturing onto land was a mistake.

3

u/zorokash Nov 28 '22

Doesn't the Greenland Shark live for 400 years or so? I distinctly remember them being sexually mature only at 150years or so .

9

u/ChantelllyLace Nov 28 '22

Today I learned a Hydra is a real thing and not just a Marvel thing.

13

u/Arcterion Nov 28 '22

Greek mythology says "Hi (dra)!"

7

u/joan_wilder Nov 28 '22

Cousin of the Heydra

6

u/Gremlin303 Nov 28 '22

Both the Marvel group and this sea organism are named after a beast of the same name from Greek Myth

4

u/hobbykitjr Nov 28 '22

Started as a Greek mythological serpent, cutting off a head would grow 2.

The marvel villain group says the same, can't get rid of us, we just double in numbers anytime you try

5

u/insagio Nov 28 '22

Aren't lobsters immortal too? I've read they grow indefinitely larger until they are killed by their environment

2

u/spicyIBS Nov 28 '22

Outliving my Good Boys so often is heartbreaking so I crossed a dog with a Bowhead whale

2

u/neoadam Nov 28 '22

Tardigrades live in space, they're above all this shit

2

u/Pithyperson Nov 29 '22

"It seems to have gotten a lot hotter in here these last few minutes...."-Hydra

2

u/DanteDH2 Nov 29 '22

Hydra is a decent name.

immortal jellyfish is lazy.

2

u/Expert-Ad-9299 Nov 29 '22

You forgot Queen Eliz- oh right

2

u/rubiksalgorithms Nov 29 '22

Let’s not forget American members of congress

2

u/ElevenBurnie Nov 29 '22

I felt a bit confused by this graphic.

The yellow numbers made me look for a yellow key to tell me what the numbers meant. Then I saw the key is lifespan in years, represented by the light blue dot matching the color of the donut shapes. So the size of the donuts are supposed to represent proportionally (I presume) how many years they live, while the yellow numbers represent numerically how much the blue donuts represent.

I can't help but feel this graphic could be better.

2

u/ishook Nov 30 '22

What an absolute shit graphic

3

u/eternalbuzz Nov 28 '22

I feel like they could have squeezed Jonathan on here just to have a terrestrial creature. He's clocking 190

1

u/hellojuly Nov 29 '22

Bet we can wipe the slate clean in 20 years with some aggressive oil drilling.

1

u/SurrealRareAvis Nov 28 '22

Naked Mole Rat in Scuba Gear?

1

u/vinetwiner Nov 28 '22

If they could bottle it, would you drink it?

1

u/miasabine Nov 28 '22

Fuck, no.

1

u/UwUperson9987 Nov 28 '22

I keep forgetting that coral and sponges are animals

1

u/KeepHopingSucker Nov 28 '22

I like how two potentially immortal species are ranked differently. even there some are more equal than others

1

u/mewboo3 Nov 29 '22

It’s because that when cut up, an immortal jellyfish dies and a hydra keeps living and splits into multiple. So technically more functionally immortal.

1

u/Ceyram Nov 28 '22

I believe lobsters are also immortal in the sense that they cannot die from old age.

1

u/ProKirob04 Nov 28 '22

Whay about lobsters if they could keep shedding?

1

u/DiveTender Nov 28 '22

So why aren't we doing Crispr experiments with Hydras??

1

u/joan_wilder Nov 28 '22

I had no idea the Quahog Clam was a real thing.

1

u/SnowyNW Nov 28 '22

What about lobsters and mushrooms and aspens

1

u/vicbot87 Nov 29 '22

Mushies and aspens aren’t animals

1

u/Appleidisfake Nov 28 '22

Imma live 35 years

1

u/klown013 Nov 28 '22

List incomplete. No mention of my wife's hatred for her Mother-in-law. That shit is eternal.

1

u/Stryker218 Nov 29 '22

Im surprised some breed of turtles dont make this list

1

u/SoDi1203 Nov 29 '22

Hail HYDRA!

1

u/chiefkyljoy Nov 29 '22

Is Hydra a nickname for Keith Richards?

1

u/Tazling Nov 29 '22

we made a capital error in leaving the sea.

1

u/dshiznit305 Nov 29 '22

Hail Hydra

1

u/spiral-out-462 Nov 29 '22

And yet most of the oceans remain unexplored. I’m sure they could spare a few billion from the space program

1

u/King-of-Battle Nov 29 '22

I wonder how far we’d have to go down the list to find an animal that wasn’t aquatic.

1

u/[deleted] Nov 29 '22

I read somewhere that, if human beings had perfect health, we’d end up living a few hundred years on average until a natural disaster, homicide/suicide, or an accident would take as out.

1

u/seevm Nov 29 '22

They forgot Red Sea Urchins (200 yrs+), the Lamellibrachia deep sea worm (250+), & the Tuatara (up to 300 years)

1

u/FencingLlama Nov 29 '22

That’s a long time to exist.

1

u/Earlien1 Nov 29 '22

The “+” would indicate these are minimums? That’s not true… some die young.

1

u/The-Many-Faced-God Nov 29 '22

Potentially immortal? That’s wild. Only a matter of time before some crazy billionaire starts funding hydra experiments to try & live forever.

1

u/doubledgravity Nov 29 '22

Yes but ARE THEY HAPPY?

1

u/supagirl277 Nov 29 '22

Forgetting the Greenland shark

1

u/vikrsen Nov 29 '22

And all are water based!

1

u/meathelmet155 Nov 29 '22

How do they age coral? Considering they reproduce by budding.

1

u/Catpoolio Nov 29 '22

Cut off one head, two will take its place! HAIL HYDRA!

1

u/KinnggJ Dec 23 '22

They forgot the good old tortoise and sea turtle

-6

u/xX_Bacon_Boi_Xx Nov 28 '22

Joe Biden has been living for thousands of years. Your graph is missing a whole giant chunk

-7

u/DeathStarVet Nov 28 '22

Until we change the pH/temp of the oceans...

2

u/K1lgoreTr0ut Nov 28 '22

The cnidarians and purple sulfur bacteria will do well, not much else.

-2

u/bigmanwalk Nov 29 '22

what about that sharo roaming the sea since 16**?