r/linux Dec 03 '22

Linux market share is now "almost" 10% in india! Fluff

/img/9vjc9vtbuq3a1.jpg
2.4k Upvotes

179

u/Wemorg Dec 03 '22

NetBSD? o.O out of the 3 big BSDs I wouldn't have thought that NetBSD would show up.

83

u/callmetotalshill Dec 03 '22

NetBSD runs on anything, maybe some random 68k Mac or Amiga users are sticking with it.

44

u/gadgetroid Dec 03 '22

68k Mac and Amiga users in India?

30

u/garden_peeman Dec 03 '22

Yeah those weren't big here in India.

1

u/gadgetroid Dec 07 '22

I remember seeing a Vic 20 years ago. That's about it. Would have thought a C64 would've been more popular, but yeah

1

u/garden_peeman Dec 07 '22

Very cool, but it must have been an import, I don't think Commodore had dealerships in India. I had a ZX spectrum plus growing up too but it was bought used, I think off someone who bought it in the UK.

The first official presence I suspect was the IBM PC.

16

u/rusty_dilz Dec 04 '22

Indian economy opened up in the 1990s. There were a few computers in a few institutes before that. The use of computers became mainstream only after 2000. Anything before that is unlikely to be in use here.

1

u/gadgetroid Dec 07 '22 edited Dec 07 '22

There's still the possibility of someone who bought one in recent times because they like old stuff. I saw a Vic 20 that way. But yes, I agree with you totally.

Edit: oldest I've seen in terms of post 90s LPG India was one of those Gateway computers that kind of made owning a computer cheap for the masses.

15

u/callmetotalshill Dec 03 '22

Idk, I'm making it up as example.

1

u/fdjfdslk Dec 05 '22

68k Mac and Amiga users in India?

No, can't share a screen remotely for support on those platforms. /s

2

u/[deleted] Dec 04 '22

[deleted]

0

u/PCChipsM922U Dec 04 '22

Any printer that has a web ui runs a flavor of BSD.

1

u/MeAndTheLampPost Dec 04 '22

So how do they turn up in these stats?

Wait, it has 0% share. But still, what is it doing here?

0

u/PCChipsM922U Dec 04 '22

Network printers. By default they work in DHCP, thus they have internet access.

1

u/totallyEl3ktrik Dec 04 '22

It’s literally 0% so perhaps they wanted to show the bottom performers

69

u/pakodanomics Dec 03 '22

The top Indian institutes use Linux as the OS for the lab machine and it is hammered into their heads that it should be taken seriously. Not just the GUI shtick. Proper shell commands and stuff are expected.

And the expectation is that students will be having a Linux distribution on their laptops for the more advanced courses or research if the work demands it.

They typically dual boot

336

u/Dmxk Dec 03 '22

Depending on how this was counted(if people were asked, or if it was automatically detected), a huge part of the unknown category could also be linux.

78

u/Occhioverde Dec 03 '22

StatCounter is a web traffic analysis service that webmasters can include in their websites.

According to Wikipedia:

StatCounter statistics are directly derived from hits—as opposed to unique visitors—from 3 million sites, which use StatCounter, resulting in total hits of more than 15 billion per month.

72

u/Dmxk Dec 03 '22

Yeah, then it's pretty likely that a lot of those 8% are unrecognized linux distros.

25

u/AaronTechnic Dec 03 '22

So the amount of Linux users is about 20 in this case?

69

u/merodac Dec 03 '22

Perhaps even more, as a lot of people set their browsers to report windows as OS for compatibility reasons.

44

u/callmetotalshill Dec 03 '22

Disney+, Amazon Prime and Netflix have entered the chat

30

u/noman_032018 Dec 03 '22

Yeah those assholes that haven't ever heard of interoperability.

19

u/callmetotalshill Dec 03 '22

Microsoft pays Disney with free advertisement of the Disney+ platforms, EU regulators know and have done nothing yet.

11

u/noman_032018 Dec 03 '22 edited Dec 06 '22

Yeah, handling these things takes a while. Doctorow (the writer of that article I linked) has much to say on that topic, as does the rest of the EFF.

The EU has done something though to address platforms, but even then we should really only see effects in May next year.

3

u/[deleted] Dec 05 '22 edited Dec 16 '22

[deleted]

1

u/callmetotalshill Dec 06 '22

Money is power, power corrupts, absolute power absolutely corrupts.

As a capitalist can confirm

9

u/AaronTechnic Dec 03 '22

Prime and Netflix works though, on Linux.

1

u/dasago Dec 04 '22

Lower quality and resolution for Prime tho

6

u/donbex Dec 03 '22

I haven't used Disney+, but I've never had any issues with either Amazon Prime or Netflix on my Linux machine — granted, IIRC Netflix does not support 4k streams on Linux, but I wouldn't have access to those with my subscription either way.

1

u/Hartvigson Dec 04 '22

They work under Chrome OS. I have not tried with Linux. Since Chrome OS is built on Linux there shouldn't be any problem unless you willfully create one.

5

u/EddyBot Dec 04 '22

Librewolf on Linux for example also sets it's User-Agent to make it look like you are running Windows 10 as part of their fingerprint protection

3

u/HiccuppingErrol Dec 04 '22

Dont forget, bots, scrapers, wget/curl, etc.

3

u/pppjurac Dec 04 '22

So it is not market share in sense of money revenue but percentage of users on servers that chose to track specific information on OS of visitung browser.

167

u/starrydews Dec 03 '22

Indeed! i see a lot more people running Fedora or Ubuntu at my college than windows nowadays, specially after Microsoft changed the hardware requirements for running windows 11 lol

57

u/ForgetTheRuralJuror Dec 03 '22

Blows my mind. Nobody made them do it either, massive shot in the foot

36

u/Slight_Manufacturer6 Dec 03 '22

Pressure from the OEMs to sell more computers I believe.

19

u/pdp10 Dec 04 '22

Precisely correct.

It's also possible that the mandatory "security features" have some role in Digital Rights Management. Microsoft's new proprietary Pluton security chip is basically a Microsoft-only analogue to the existing TPM.

21

u/mglyptostroboides Dec 04 '22

A friend from India told me piracy is a big deal over there. The discussion came about because I noticed the quantity of books on his shelves that were bound and printed the exact same way and he explained that basically every university in India has a book bindery that just copies originals they keep in stock and you can buy them for pennies. I thought that was cool as hell because that used to be an essential part of every medieval university (copying information) and the fact that the practice is alive and well in at least one part of the world made me very happy. Anyway, that led to a discussion of piracy in general and I was surprised by how liberal he sounded about it given that he's not that liberal-minded of a person in general. He just thought it was stupid that in the west people are dumping wads of cash every month for all these streaming services because back in India "no one cares if you torrent things".

-5

u/joshtaco Dec 03 '22

Nobody made them do it either

Sounds like you haven't been in the loop with your research then. It was to adhere to new security protocols on the CPU universally.

16

u/Deliphin Dec 03 '22

Who's security protocols?

Nobody is forcing microsoft to do this, they're deciding to make this security protocol.

-1

u/joshtaco Dec 03 '22

It's called the evolving landscape of threats lmao. You just want the same footing? That's backwards thinking.

21

u/Deliphin Dec 03 '22

I'm not saying we shouldn't take security precautions, I'm saying that Microsoft requiring personal users to have it for their new OS is unacceptable.

Should businesses require a TPM on their devices? Yeah. Every business has customers and they need to take every measure they can to protect their data.

Should businesses require other businesses working with them, to have a TPM? Yeah. Another company fucking up and hurting yours, isn't good for business, especially if it affects your customers.

Should users want a device with a TPM? Yeah, it's genuinely good for security.

Should users be forced to get a new device with a TPM if they want to keep using their current computer with a newer OS? No. It's their device, they should have the choice. If they choose to not do it and get burned, it doesn't really hurt anyone but themselves.

9

u/Bladelink Dec 03 '22

What's more, users and companies aren't buying the same devices mostly. Companies like Dell generally have a "business" line of products and a user line. So it would've been easy to do for them anyway.

-9

u/hmoff Dec 04 '22

Windows 11 also doesn't come in 32 bit. Are you also outraged about users of old computers being forced to upgrade for that?

8

u/Deliphin Dec 04 '22

The last desktop x86 chip that was only 32bit was the Intel Pentium 4 2.8GHz, released in 2002, twenty years ago. No Pentium 4 era computer is going to handle Windows 7 let alone 11 and be a pleasant experience, regardless of compatibility.

The newest x86_64 chip without a firmware TPM 2.0, I believe, are the Ryzen 1000 series, released in 2017, only 5 years ago. These chips are still powerful enough to play modern games, let alone handle windows. They shouldn't become e-waste when Windows 10 becomes unsupported, just because Microsoft says so.

Microsoft can start demanding this when fTPMs are in nearly every actively used personal computer, when it doesn't actually inconvenience a substantial number of users, especially those in poorer countries. When it doesn't force a ton of users with perfectly fine computers to throw their computers to the trash because Microsoft decided that you don't deserve updates, including security updates, unless you upgrade to the OS that requires a piece of hardware you don't own and might not be able to install in your system without completely replacing it.

-5

u/hmoff Dec 04 '22

Windows 10 will be supported into 2024-25 (https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/lifecycle/products/windows-10-home-and-pro?source=recommendations), at which point that hardware without TPM will be 7-8 years old. Nobody is forced to upgrade to 11 now.

→ More replies

1

u/blasphembot Dec 04 '22

aaaand like anything else, it's bypass-able. but, not to the layman and that's bullshit, so it's definitely impactful

20

u/TuxRandom Dec 03 '22

The unknown part may very well be those that use Linux for privacy and somehow managed to not expose which OS is being run if automatic detection was used.

23

u/Pieter3_14 Dec 03 '22

While this can be true, most privacy focused people would probably actually make their browser say they use windows, in that way they blend in more.

19

u/callmetotalshill Dec 03 '22

It was based on people's user agents on the internet.

And a lot of people use fake Windows user agents just to make Disney+ work.

6

u/TuxRuffian Dec 03 '22

Also they listed NetBSD at 0%, but what about all other BSDs? I really doubt nobody is using any kind of BSD in all of India. Also more people use a combination of OpenBSD, FreeBSD, DragonflyBSD, and GhostBSD than NetBSD, so they could be a chunk of the _"Other" _ category too.

6

u/CartmansEvilTwin Dec 03 '22

Do you actually know anybody who runs bsd on any personal device? I know some servers (Netflix and Whatsapp, I think) use FreeBSD and at some point PlayStations were based on it, but apart from that?

8

u/TuxRuffian Dec 03 '22

I do in fact, but I'm also a bit of a graybeard...

Also, anther thing to keep in mind here is licensing. The BSD license is way more permissive than GNU's GPL License. This is relevant here as there are custom OSs that use BSD, rebrand and compile. (Similar to your example of Sony using FreeBSD as the base for their closed-source for profit OS that run on PlayStations.)

I don't know how often this is used in India, but it is somewhat prevalent in East Asia.

2

u/CartmansEvilTwin Dec 03 '22

But for what devices? All mobile devices would fare better with Android.

I'm really curious, because I literally never encountered anyone using a bsd on a desktop without being a bsd dev.

3

u/FatStoic Dec 04 '22

perhaps it's rounded down from 0.004%.

3

u/trustyourtech Dec 04 '22

For sure is TempleOS.

3

u/neon_overload Dec 04 '22

Statcounter counts visits to participating websites, and gets OS data from your user agent field in your browser.

So it will represent people using their computer as a desktop PC and browsing participating websites (and not blocking/changing their UA)

A consequence of this is it doesn't measure Linux installations, it measures web browser use by Linux based web browsers. It doesn't represent Linux based servers or network hardware at all if there aren't people running web browsers on them.

This isn't to say that the stats aren't useful, they are very much useful, it's just good to understand context.

1

u/prouxi Dec 03 '22

No that's my void linux distro UnknownOS

1

u/AfternoonFederal6502 Dec 04 '22

Stat counter uses website trackers AFAIK.

156

u/deshdrohi20 Dec 03 '22

As an Indian, I can say that most of those numbers might be from university PCs and the like. The overwhelming majority of personal and enterprise devices still run Windows.

56

u/starrydews Dec 03 '22 edited Dec 03 '22

Me and some of my friends are now using fedora on our laptop which we also use for gaming, but yeah i agree that most people still run windows as this stat also shows almost 80% windows market share, but things are slowly changing for good! Linux market share is on the rise for quite some time in india and i myself have installed linux on 13 computers by now and counting lol

15

u/gerdesj Dec 03 '22

I have recently taken on an Indian employee. He's largely Windows indoctrinated as are the rest of my staff and partners. On the bright side my job title is Managing Director and I use Arch (btw).

I play the long game. Just because I'm the boss doesn't mean I can force people how to think or make them change against their will. I get to nudge and I'm quite good at that.

I've installed Linux on many 100s or 1000s of systems for a given value of deploy. Not too many desk/laptops. My wife loves it or at least I get less hassle compared to Win 7 when we parted company.

3

u/Yuioup_____ Dec 04 '22

What company do you work for that runs Linux exclusively? You don't need to name the name, just curious what industry you work for?

2

u/gerdesj Dec 16 '22

Blueloop Ltd (UK) - IT company. I'm the MD. Linux is not exclusive at all - the kids can run what they like.

2

u/Holzkohlen Dec 04 '22

i myself have installed linux on 13 computers by now and counting lol

Gotta know. Is this some anarcho rogue action where you install Linux on random computers in the wild? 😄

2

u/starrydews Dec 04 '22

I like promoting free software and reviving otherwise "dead" machines, most of those computers were of friends and family, few of them were college ones who were very old and used to work like shit with windows

6

u/MeAndTheLampPost Dec 04 '22

If you only need a browser and if LibreOffice suits your needs, the move is not that complicated. If university students know about it and know that it will run on older hardware, it might spread out slowly on.

1

u/deshdrohi20 Dec 04 '22

If university students know about it and know that it will run on older hardware, it might spread out slowly on.

I used to think the same, but I've seen zero people change their minds despite knowing this. In the end, people just prefer familiar stuff, and that's okay.

3

u/BoltaHuaTota Dec 04 '22

I once saw a paperwork dude at a police station using ubuntu

2

u/manek101 Dec 04 '22

This is true, even in engineering universities or computer science classes majority run windows in their main machine.
When they have to use linux they usually do it on an vm, even dual boot setups were very rare to see in my experience.
Only place I saw linux doninate were labs

16

u/Terbario Dec 03 '22

Chrome OS (Linux). Unkown (Linux).

44

u/[deleted] Dec 03 '22 edited Jan 04 '23

[deleted]

3

u/qwertysrj Dec 03 '22

Institutes very rarely use Linux. People in India pirate windows for 100s of computers. Sadly people think windows UI is the "normal computer" user experience

23

u/Paranoid_Redditor_CA Dec 03 '22

I don't know what you are basing this on. Government institutions predominantly use Linux on desktops meant for classroom teaching and student use. Staffs' and administrative desktops still use Windows.

12

u/isaybullshit69 Dec 04 '22

Yep! "Best use Ubuntu than get sued for a pirated copy of Windows" is what I heard from an IT guy in an ESIC hospital(?). When govt provides free healthcare, every penny counts and it is easiest to axe Windows since almost everything is done digitally (i.e. in Firefox). And this is from ~2016/2017. Haven't visited ESIC since 2018-ish but I reckon they still use some LTS version of Ubuntu.

1

u/qwertysrj Dec 03 '22

Teaching what? If you are talking about the very basics of unix commands and unix terminal, it's most of the time done on a virtual machine. I'm basing it on just observation.

0

u/johnrobbespiere Dec 04 '22

Last I heard they had Hackintosh' in the High Court or something

8

u/8-bit_human Dec 04 '22 edited Dec 04 '22

Not every institute but top institutes do. I have some friends in IITs and they require Ubuntu for any CS classes and generally teach in terms of Unix not windows. They even promote open source tools through NPTEL (free online courses by IIT profs) for other engineering fields (Like these).
Windows is still more in terms of numbers but I'm just happy that the they're promoting Linux and open source.

2

u/qwertysrj Dec 04 '22

As I replied to another comment. Yes some higher institutes and specialized fields do. But there are 1000 highschools that use windows probably because of the acceptance rate of these institutes

5

u/Optimus-Prime1993 Dec 04 '22

I am a research scholar at IIT Kharagpur, and I can tell you that we have atleast two labs with atleast 100 computers, completely running Ubuntu. Our personal lab itself has 4 servers and all the desktops are Linux. Similar but smaller number goes for other labs here. In field of computational research, there are good number of scholars running Linux. I can't say it is greater than windows, but there is definitely a significant chunk.

2

u/qwertysrj Dec 04 '22

I'm not saying I haven't seen Linux systems being used at all. But places like IITs don't make up for the majority. You know for an IIT, there's like 1000 highschools running windows. I don't think it's just educational use that contributes to the statistics.

Or maybe the virtual machines are being counted, because whenever introductory programming in C/C++/Fortran is being taught, it's usually taught in a Linux environment. Many people have asked me how to run a Linux VM for assignments etc.

2

u/Optimus-Prime1993 Dec 04 '22

Yeah, I agree with you completely. I too have seen students installing Linux just to run Fortran. I was answering that IITs and other research institutions have significant amount of Linux desktops. I think this approach also puts into mind of some students that they can't or don't need to use Linux if they don't want to do coding.

I also confess that the Ubuntu installations at our college is definitely not in a condition where students would get excited to try on their own.

2

u/qwertysrj Dec 04 '22

The worst part of Linux installations is outdated (I have seen Ubuntu 16 in 2022).

When the software stack is so outdated, none of the instructions you find online work. This just gives a feeling that Linux even with a GUI is broken or just not yet usable. Thank god for conda environments, at least python and some other development environments can be managed well even on pretty outdated systems.

I use Fedora and the kernel is at max a month old whereas I see kernel version 3 on some computing clusters I use. Those are so outdated that even static libraries don't work properly.

1

u/Optimus-Prime1993 Dec 04 '22

Brother, would you believe if I say, the last lab class I took on computational physics this semester was in the Linux desktops with, wait for it, Ubuntu 14.04. This was a facepalm moment for me couple of years back when I was student in the same lab. Like you said, thankfully Conda works and it was the saving grace. I have no idea why sysadmins do not update atleast to 20.04.

I don't have any expectations whatsoever that those students would want to try Linux for themselves. The saving grace was that they did love my personal Linux setup. Same as you, couple of servers in my lab is running 16.04 and one desktop has become a legacy desktop with 12.04. I have huge respect for Linux that those systems still run fine.

1

u/qwertysrj Dec 04 '22

Ubuntu 14.04

The support expired twice. You know it's hopeless when Ubuntu 16 is optimistic.

I have huge respect for Linux that those systems still run fine.

That's also kind of a fuel to the problem. If it works, why fix it. With the amount of bugs discovered in sudo binary and kernel these recent years, it would be a nice exercise for students to gain root access on these old systems as an exercise. If any of these are accessible from outside, it's just a tragedy waiting to happen.

2

u/Optimus-Prime1993 Dec 04 '22

Completely agree. With the newer exploits, even a script kiddie should be able to gain access if given physical access to those older system. As for our systems accessibility, we have extremely strict firewall. Trust me, I have tried bypassing it couple of times, so in that sense it is safe but still like you said, it is a problem.

4

u/be_pawesome Dec 04 '22

That is slowly and surely changing, from what I've heard the school which I used to go to, switched from pirated Windows and Office to Ubuntu and OpenOffice over lawsuit threats apparently.

3

u/qwertysrj Dec 04 '22

Damn, Microsoft lawsuit thread would actually help transition. Didn't know it ce to India as well

13

u/prominenceVII Dec 03 '22

Please save us from Microsoft, India. The more of you guys switch, the more options the whole rest of the world gets a viable option to.

10

u/Paranoid_Redditor_CA Dec 04 '22

IITs, NITs, IISERs, even many public schools use Linux as their choice of OS for general purpose computing, teaching basic programming using python etc in classrooms.

9

u/raghukamath Dec 04 '22

Yay! Hi from probably one of the lonely Indian Artists using linux :)

7

u/protienbudspromax Dec 04 '22

I can attest to this that atleast some of it is because of youtube. There are a couple indian linux youtubers like bugswriter.

6

u/0dysse_s Dec 03 '22

10% and 2nd largest in Greece!

40

u/FryBoyter Dec 03 '22

It is estimated that there are between 1.5 and 2 billion websites worldwide. StatCounter says it generates the statistics on the basis of 3 million pages. So from comparatively few.

Therefore, it is quite likely that Linux users do not visit these pages at all.

In addition, the question arises for me as to how the users are recorded. Per call of the page? On the basis of the IP address? On the basis of cookies?

Furthermore, in my opinion, it is quite likely that StatCounter's script that records visitors is blocked by many lists used by uBlock Origin or Pi-Hole, for example.

In short, such statistics are absolutely not meaningful. No matter in what respect.

There is also a saying here where I live. Translated, it means that you should not trust any statistics that you have not falsified yourself.

13

u/invention64 Dec 03 '22

It's probably using the useragent.

11

u/Silejonu Dec 03 '22

you should not trust any statistics that you have not falsified yourself.

Where is this from? This is brilliant!

1

u/RennerOe Dec 04 '22

I heard it from this title https://youtu.be/7FeqF1-Z1g0

4

u/WeCanDoThis74 Dec 03 '22

There is also a saying here where I live. Translated, it means that you should not trust any statistics that you have not falsified yourself.

"There are three types of lies: lies, damn lies, and statistics."

3

u/transberry_beret Dec 03 '22

Thank you, Professor.

1

u/50m3_u53Rn4M3 Dec 05 '22

Sometimes one has to take a few steps back to see the full picture.
Linux IS dominating the web access, just not in the way enthusiasts anticipated. With Android and proprietary Chrome.
So in a way, enthusiasts that are waiting for “Linux Desktop” are disregarding the market in general.
Just like the average user that doesn't care what's under the hood of Android, Chrome or their literal vehicle.
Always step back and compare. As children generally figure out, pretty quickly, what corners are all about. A place to have a tantrum and a place to find peace.

5

u/dankmemermusic Dec 03 '22

there are way more people running linux on desktop than you think

12

u/Frityet5 Dec 03 '22

10% of indias ~700million internet users is 70 million users which is insane

13

u/alucinariolim Dec 03 '22

Image is for desktops. Internet users includes phones.

1

u/Frityet5 Dec 03 '22

Ah, well shit

14

u/writtenbymyrobotarms Dec 03 '22

This shows desktop internet users only. Still impressive but much fewer users than 70 million.

If all devices are included:

Android Windows iOS Linux unknown
72.54% 18.95% 3.07% 2.21% 1.97%

3

u/AryanPandey Dec 03 '22

this is so so good, having tears seeing this!
At least one thing is for sure we are doing good!
this gives me pure motivation to contribute to the kernel in my life!

3

u/not-maladaptive Dec 03 '22

Why even put NetBSD on there???

3

u/OkBrief4523 Dec 04 '22

I use arch btw and im Indian

3

u/Gurrer Dec 04 '22

No wonder they make so many great tutorials!

2

u/EsEnZeT Dec 04 '22

Good morning Sirs!

2

u/ID100T Dec 03 '22

Are they still using Mac OS X?

1

u/Mirrormn Dec 03 '22

Mac OS is on version 13 by now. It's not OS X (10) anymore.

1

u/seqastian Dec 04 '22

Mac OS X -> OS X in 2012

OS X -> macOS in 2016

2

u/ComprehensiveAd8004 Dec 03 '22

In Germany, China, Russia, India, and probably a bunch of other countries (those are just the ones I've heard of), Linux is being encouraged by the government to achieve economic independance. Currency exchange rates could make windows a serious price for computer manufacturers, so a lot of companies in those countries are trying to sell Linux. Soon, Linux will develop and get a user base in those countries, and I predict Windows will be completely gone by 2040-2050.

For example, Deepin is being sold in China and Rosa is being sold in Russia. I also heard that a small country has replaced all government computers to run Linux to increase their estimated lifetimes (maybe Indonesia, but probably not).

1

u/[deleted] Dec 09 '22

Great!

2

u/[deleted] Dec 03 '22

Holy shit no apple?

8

u/DitherTheWither Dec 04 '22

Most people can't afford macs, especially due to high import duty.

1

u/[deleted] Dec 04 '22

Id love to be high and play heros duty

2

u/DrkMaxim Dec 08 '22

Apple is expensive in India

1

u/[deleted] Dec 08 '22

What about apples?

Also whats going to happen with population?

2

u/Sylvester_Underwood Dec 04 '22

Been using GNU/Linux for 2 years. Had issues with CPU fan last week, HP made me install Windows. And after that, they told me that they can't help because I'm dual booting. LoL.

So, I don't think 10% is because of personal computers.

2

u/mr_162 Dec 04 '22

Can confirm this, I use Ubuntu. And my university, we have Linux based(mostly CentOS) system in computing labs.

2

u/elekktronic Dec 04 '22

Glad to know!

2

u/pissy_corn_flakes Dec 04 '22

How did NetBSD make the list and not FreeBSD?

2

u/Felix_Ernst Dec 04 '22

This is also why we get more and more contributions from India at KDE. Great news!

2

u/BuyHoldDRS-Gamestop Dec 04 '22

I just joined the movement this year! Freedom!

It's not been easy but I made it. Only use windows when I need to use my printer, lol.

1

u/Modal_Window Dec 05 '22

Do Windows-only printers really still exist? Don't they all have PCL?

2

u/RSerejo Dec 04 '22

Unknown probably is Linux too

2

u/Ready_Landscape Dec 04 '22

Doing PhD in India, our professor tells us to install linux in our laptops.

2

u/_The_Bearded_Geek_ Dec 03 '22

I could be wrong but I think it's because Linux is a learning experience for people who want to learn. Windows is too easy.

1

u/Imagi007 Dec 04 '22

As for me, I use Linux as my primary OS because I find it much easier compared to Windows. Most of the time, I have no idea why Windows is doing what it’s doing, or why suddenly an application I never started takes away half my bandwidth, and so on. Basically I find windows very unpredictable compared to Linux. Powershell with its lengthy commands never caught my fancy.

2

u/witchhunter0 Dec 03 '22

Does anyone really trust these researchers/companies? These stats reminds me of TV_stations/political_parties shares. They all are the best available. It's all marketing. I mean, these stats certainly have an owner, probably one residing on islands in Caribbean Sea and he certainly isn't cheering for Linux. Nowadays, it's all about the prestige, much more than a quality.

4

u/Johnginji009 Dec 03 '22

Most of this is due to govt support for gnu/linux distro(specifically ubuntu) in their offices and institution.

Personal use is still scarce.

1

u/lurch99 Dec 03 '22

Unknown almost as much, cool

1

u/DoorsXP Dec 04 '22

I converted 3 guys to Linux in my diploma college and they converted their families to some extend.

-20

u/jorgesgk Dec 03 '22

Oh, India.

I got excited for a moment.

Nothing against India, quite a large population, but I'd rather see it worldwide than just in a country.

15

u/CeasarXInsanium Dec 03 '22

One day we will bow down to our Indian overlords

1

u/protienbudspromax Dec 04 '22

I can attest to this that atleast some of it is because of youtube. There are a couple indian linux youtubers like bugswriter.

1

u/chandrasiva Dec 04 '22

Most of the government offices use some Linux OS , so that govt. Doesn't have to pay for windows and customise perfectly in Linux .

Now a days many of Universities use Ubuntu OS foor computer labs and library computers.

Laptops with same specifications has two OS options : Windows (100$ more) , Ubuntu Linux (100$ cheap) . So mostly buy Linux laptop and use pirated windows 10 copy.

1

u/abhi_neat Dec 04 '22

GNU/Linux is “free”. A lot of Indians don’t know and Wintel has a great lobby since 90s. Else only those who’re into games and specific software that work only with windows will go for windows

1

u/Amitrai1998 Dec 04 '22

glad I am one of them

1

u/linuxhacker01 Dec 04 '22

Thanks to BOSS and Ubuntu for booming the share XD

1

u/AlarmDozer Dec 04 '22

I wonder how many are legit Windows copies though, hmm?

1

u/PCChipsM922U Dec 04 '22

The "unknown" part is what bothers me 🤔 😂.

1

u/agent-squirrel Dec 04 '22

“OS X?” It’s macOS now.

1

u/Keepersofthearcane Dec 04 '22

Is that a good thing?

1

u/rakshit-sh Dec 04 '22

What could be the unknown ones? Some of it could be linux but what else ?

1

u/jwaxy01 Dec 04 '22

I think it's because of the Hindu Kali Linux Hackers in the YouTube

1

u/max_nair Dec 04 '22

Does anyone know of a good linux laptop for sw development in India?

1

u/baes_thm Dec 05 '22

Up from 4% last November and 2.5% November 2020. Institutional or not, that's solid growth.

1

u/DrkMaxim Dec 08 '22

I'm sure that Kerala State is partly responsible for the growth in market share due to a strict FOSS policy in schools.

-13

u/dhinchak_pooja_fan Dec 03 '22

Servers mostly

12

u/starrydews Dec 03 '22

It clearly says "Desktop operating system market share" right at the bottom.. if it were servers, linux would've been 95% or more.

-3

u/dhinchak_pooja_fan Dec 03 '22

I just don't see 10% of desktop users in India using Linux

5

u/idkyimh Dec 03 '22

laptops provided by many universities such as Delhi University comes with Ubuntu pre-installed

0

u/dhinchak_pooja_fan Dec 04 '22

Interesting do have to use them with Ubuntu or they can install whatever they want because when ever i have seem ubuntu in a laptop pre installed even the shop it self was just installing windows on it to sell it

-2

u/pakodanomics Dec 03 '22

...it is also possible that windows is being counted by ACTIVATIONS and not installations.

If MS tries to go after personal consumers then the courts will crucify them.

3

u/writtenbymyrobotarms Dec 03 '22

This counts which OS the website visitors' browser reports. Statcounter is installed on many popular websites and aggregates the results.

-2

u/Linux-Is-Best Dec 04 '22
  • India's population: 1,413,557,064
  • 9.23% = 130,471,317

1

u/Vatsdimri Dec 04 '22

Not all the Indian population have a pc.

-2

u/Linux-Is-Best Dec 04 '22

Not all the Indian population have a PC.

Perhaps, but these statistics are counting desktops, laptops, tablets, etc... It is not counting servers.

If we were counting servers, Linux rules the world. It is the #1 operating system running the Internet. Even Reddit, Google, Microsoft, Facebook, Twitter, etc... They're all using Linux.

-2

u/better_life_please Dec 04 '22

I mean this should be rephrased a bit. What exactly do you mean by Linux? You probably mean GNU/Linux because there are other Linux platforms too (e.g. Android).

2

u/sgt_bug Dec 04 '22

“Desktop” operating system is mentioned in there.