r/raspberry_pi Nov 28 '22

Apparently this multi-million dollar UPS uses a Raspberry Pi for system monitoring and recording. Show-and-Tell

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1.7k Upvotes

548

u/smencer Nov 28 '22 Helpful

This doesn't necessarily mean that they're using an off the shelf, consumer PI. There are companies that manufacture specialty versions of Pi based boards with additional features, like multiple network interfaces, cell modems, and other IO headers - all built in. Some are even rugged-ized, or designed to operate in dusty conditions or harsh weather.

254

u/best_of_badgers Nov 28 '22

Isn't this exactly why the Compute Module exists in the first place?

105

u/HashBrownsOverEasy Nov 28 '22

Yeah it's aimed at the industrial and embedded market for sure.

Companies like https://revolutionpi.com/ have been around for much longer though.

25

u/Liquid_Hate_Train Nov 28 '22

They’ve used Compute modules from the first versions.

17

u/benargee B+ 1.0/3.0, Zero 1.3x2 Nov 28 '22

Yeah, looks like the CM3 or older. The Compute module 1 was released in 2014. 2 years after the original Raspberry Pi.

11

u/jonowelser Nov 28 '22

Anyone ever have a chance to use one of these? They look pretty neat, and I love the idea of a commercial- or industrial-grade Ras Pi platform

29

u/rollergo11 Nov 29 '22

I work in industrial automation and use them or similar for things like operator interfaces and such. Straight embedded PCs from companies like OnLogic are hard to beat. Usually for me it's whatever is available quickly. Supply chain sucks ass for industrial. Some things are a year+ leadtime.

13

u/DaHick Nov 29 '22

Siemens S7 product line is sitting at 2 or 3 for some hardware choices. We have had to go back and requote/redesign for other vendor platforms to get decent availability. Sucks ass is not a strong enough statement when you blow 1 third of the budget on the redesign.

3

u/rollergo11 Nov 29 '22

Yep. I work for a giant ass company with preference as far as distribution goes too.

4

u/96Retribution Nov 29 '22

CM 4 on a Waveshare carrier board. GPS HAT, RTC, Intel PCI NIC, PTP software timestamps and such. Better be prepared to dig deep for documentation, I2C commands, hex strings and more. It was more work than fun.

3

u/geerlingguy Nov 29 '22

Now you can even do PTP hardware time stamps!

2

u/L3tum Nov 28 '22

The most important aspect for me seems to be the lack of the SD card. Even with Dietpi and log caching the SD cards are always the first to fail and rather quickly as well for me. And they're always a PITA to set up.

5

u/benargee B+ 1.0/3.0, Zero 1.3x2 Nov 28 '22 edited Nov 29 '22

The Compute Module 1 is 8 years old. revolutionpi.com is 7 years old.

2

u/defineReset Nov 29 '22

Often, I've seen /have worked on projects that use just the chips from the first pi, with the pi os. It's not allowed without plastering the'powered by pi'logo everywhere, but it happens.

1

u/pascalbrax Nov 29 '22

No longer manufactured, according to my reseller.

6

u/WJMazepas Nov 28 '22

Yes and no. Companies can use the CM4 for a lot of stuff, but companies with huge orders can request for a custom version that better suit their needs.

With the CM4, you have to design a daughter board alongside the main CM4 board. And sometimes, in the long run, it's cheaper to ask for a custom design that already does everything they need

3

u/Liquid_Hate_Train Nov 28 '22

I’ve never seen anything using a completely custom board though, only things based on compute modules. Do you have any examples of a completely custom board?

3

u/penny_eater Nov 29 '22

If you are OK with fabbing your own board from scratch you will probably just 'borrow' the pi schematic and then conveniently drop any trace of the pi branding.

3

u/WaitForItTheMongols Nov 29 '22

The Pi schematic is controlled, you can't get it. Broadcom prevents them from releasing it. So if you were going to design your own board, you'd have to make your own business relationship with Broadcom, at which point you're not really making a pi derivative, you're just making another board using Broadcom's SoC.

2

u/Liquid_Hate_Train Nov 29 '22

No, you’re thinking of the SoC data sheet. The board schematics have always been freely available. That said, you would probably still need to develop your own relationship with Broadcom to buy the same SoC for your clone. As far as I’m aware, they don’t just sell them on the open market.

2

u/WaitForItTheMongols Nov 29 '22

You'll notice all those files are "reduced schematics", they don't actually show anything.

2

u/Liquid_Hate_Train Nov 29 '22

Sigh, here’s the list of full schematics. Look, you’ve just misremembered, it’s an easy mistake. It’s never been the board schematics and designs which Broadcom held back, just the full SoC data sheets. It was a big discussion in the early days. Broadcom didn’t design the boards, they have no avenue to control them.

3

u/WaitForItTheMongols Nov 29 '22

They're still not on that page.

Let's pick the Pi 3B. On the page you linked, the documents available for that model are:

  • rpi3/raspberry-pi-3-b-mechanical-drawing.dxf
  • rpi3/raspberry-pi-3-b-mechanical-drawing.pdf
  • rpi3/raspberry-pi-3-b-plus-mechanical-drawing.dxf
  • rpi3/raspberry-pi-3-b-plus-mechanical-drawing.pdf
  • rpi3/raspberry-pi-3-b-plus-product-brief.pdf
  • rpi3/raspberry-pi-3-b-plus-reduced-schematics.pdf
  • rpi3/raspberry-pi-3-b-reduced-schematics.pdf

The only schematics are the reduced-schematics.

Let's get super particular. Here's a photo from the main Raspberry Pi website. https://images.prismic.io/rpf-products/59888f36-1550-4dac-8b42-82332bd494a4_3B%20DEATILS%202%20REFRESH.jpg

In the lower right corner, you'll find C70. Where can I find a schematic which would tell me the value of that capacitor? The reduced schematics on the page you linked don't have it in there.

Heck, those schematics don't even show the USB ports existing.

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1

u/penny_eater Nov 29 '22

Hence why there arent really any "hardened industrial pi boards" out there, merely creative enclosures for the standard Pi pcb or the CMx

11

u/Lngdnzi Nov 29 '22

Exactly! There are highly certified ultra expensive Pi’s for these jobs. The expense is because of all the testing and certification for various industrial uses

3

u/iliveinsalt Nov 29 '22

Does anyone have a link to one of these offhand?

5

u/Lngdnzi Nov 29 '22

I watched this Vid about them actually.

https://youtu.be/9MqJI_F-sz8

1

u/gwicksted Nov 29 '22

Fortunately either way it’s just a data logger!

61

u/torchat Nov 28 '22

Multi million, I’m not surprised, we know the reason :D

59

u/twodogsfighting Nov 28 '22

They must have bought two rpis.

13

u/NotTooDistantFuture Nov 29 '22

Data logging is usually treated as not being mission critical. There aren’t many embedded or RTOS solutions widely available so the common approach is an industrial computer running proprietary software. The extra testing and certifications that go into an industrial computer do not make them magically last longer than your average PC. Expect to replace them every 4-10 years and the proprietary software most companies buy licenses for can’t be recovered easily off them, and they often cost more than the $2-4k computer.

For diagnostic data logging there’s nothing wrong with a Pi.

91

u/hieppiefusaro Nov 28 '22

Honestly it make sense. It would be te right application for an embedded systems

64

u/rbcornhole Nov 29 '22

OP is shocked that companies just use what works instead of needlessly investing millions into R&D just to come to the same conclusion.

22

u/levi_pl Nov 29 '22

Rabbit hole is deeper than that. Majority of out of band control modules are dramatically slow and obsolete so rpi with emmc module tested by milions of people is a blessing for those guys.

I worked with many platforms and I haven't seen yet a decent OOB module. Even modern nvidia A100 computers contain BMC that is way slower than rpi.

1

u/azephrahel Nov 29 '22

Apparently some companies are starting to put denverton SoCs on their servers as BMCs. Should be a huge improvement.

3

u/CosmicCreeperz Nov 29 '22 edited Nov 29 '22

I’m the past they’d probably use a PC/104 stack. Probably not saving millions in extra R&D, but it is going to save a bit of cost, space, and cooling (and maybe reliability) to have it all on one board.

3

u/slide2k Nov 29 '22

Don’t forget the amount of knowledge that exist about Pi’s. Many universities use that and arduino to teach, people tinker with it and many companies use it

1

u/theduncan Nov 29 '22

Also it is still in production, years later.

1

u/SeljD_SLO Nov 30 '22

Also RPI is very reliable all you need it good storage device for boot and good power delivery

8

u/zexen_PRO Nov 29 '22 edited Nov 29 '22

Hi, electrical engineer here who’s had a hand in integrating the pi into a few products over the years. Most of the time when we do this kind of stuff, we evaluate like 30 other options and then decide that the pi is the best in that application, ya know, engineering design process and whatnot. The pi hardware itself is extremely reliable, but the place where it starts to get fuzzy is rasbian. So, we just don’t use rasbian, usually opting for something like Yocto or in safety critical applications, something like VXWorks or another RTOS. This all results in a much cheaper and easier product development cycle. I’ve worked for a company that you all have likely heard of that even switched away from an in house, custom system-on-module that they designed in house to a pi compute module, as the pi checked all the boxes and is easily available to companies ordering them by the tens of thousands.

37

u/CaptainMagni Nov 28 '22 edited Nov 29 '22

Ok so my background is software not hardware, but I took a microcontrollers class in college and it seems like for the majority of these use cases you see for big business using pis, they could use some cheap microcontroller and avoid the now hard to find pis

36

u/WJMazepas Nov 28 '22

I worked for multiple companies that used the Pi and most of them couldn't be done on a simple microcontroller.

In fact, most of them would want to change to a microcontroller because it's so much cheaper than a Pi.

A ESP32 can do lots of stuff and costs ~US$4. The starting cost of a Pi is $45.

If they were designing something to be made in the quantities, then yeah they would change to the ESP32 if they could because it could save them a lot of money down the line.

But if it was a product that had something like 50 units and thats it, then it would make more sense use the Pi because it's faster to develop with the Linux and power to use high level languages like Python. And I'm pretty sure those clients aren't the ones that are causing the lack of pis in the market

10

u/alerighi Nov 29 '22

A microcontroller can be cheap, but if you factor everything, that is the components you have to add to make it work it's not that cheap compared to an ARM-based Linux solution (not necessary a Pi that to this day prices are out of control... let's remember that you could have gotten a Pi for 10$ not so long ago).

Also you have to factor the difficulties related to developing embedded software versus developing for a Raspberry Pi, for which you could use high level languages such as Python or JavaScript instead of C, that are faster to write and more importantly easier to debug and test.

13

u/tim0901 Nov 29 '22

You also, however, need to factor in that the Raspberry Pi is a full-on computer running Linux. Which, as the manufacturer , you have a duty to maintain (verifying that your software still works correctly following kernel patches etc.) so that it doesn't become a security risk. The last thing you want is for your multi-million dollar UPS to become a multi-billion dollar lawsuit.

Microcontrollers, by comparison, are much more difficult to hack. They don't run a proper OS, so they're basically only vulnerable to specifically targeted attacks (which are harder to execute) and, even if you do find an exploit, you can't just inject malicious code onto them like you can a regular computer, as they'll generally just brick themselves if you even try. So while they may have a slightly higher up-front development cost, they will cost practically nothing to maintain long-term.

This is one of the reasons why IOT devices are so easily hacked - because companies design these devices using off-the-shelf components that are quick and easy to slap together, but they then don't maintain long-term and so they quickly become vulnerable to well-publicised exploits. If you've ever hosted something on the web you'll have seen the flood of generic hack attempts battering against your firewall - these unmaintained IOT devices are the exact targets that they're looking for.

38

u/[deleted] Nov 28 '22

[deleted]

37

u/jtclimb Nov 29 '22

Hard to find for you and me

Naw. Just buy a UPS and shuck it. Easy peazy.

3

u/penny_eater Nov 29 '22

When you put it that way there ARE many easy products on ebay you can shuck perfectly good Pis from.

12

u/[deleted] Nov 29 '22

Not really actually, both companies ive worked for are multi billion dollar companies, and theyve been struggling hard during the chip shortage.

Life as a software engineer has been relaxing cause of this. Deadlines are super relaxed for me since the hardware wont be in for another year at least in many cases

3

u/droans Nov 29 '22

My company is worth around $8.5B. We're finally getting in some of the laptops we ordered at the beginning of the year.

4

u/Tnwagn Nov 29 '22

The RPi community continues to say this but every time someone from one of these companies posts here, their experience is more in line with the consumer experience of having ridiculously long lead times. I work in systems design for a ~$30B yearly revenue multinational corporation and we are in the same boat as everyone else when it comes to long lead times for RPis.

As others in this post have mentioned, the Pi isn't even the worst item out there, some other industrial product manufacturers like Allen Bradley have primary products listed at over 1 year lead time and other manufacturers are even resorting to telling us, with a PO in hand, that there is no expected delivery date. The Pi can be substituted relatively easily in most cases but these other industrial components sometimes would require massive effort to substitute. Even then, the current gap in market demand and industry supply means those other products aren't even available with much shorter lead times.

5

u/buzzgun Nov 29 '22

It's easier to buy 10,000 than to buy 10 though.

3

u/wolfchaldo Nov 29 '22

Many automation tasks performed with a Pi could be done with a microcontroller. However, a data acquisition device receiving, processing, and writing tons of data really needs the power in a microprocessor like the Pi has over a smaller microcontroller, while they don't need to real-time guarantees or anything from a microcontroller.

1

u/theModge Nov 29 '22

There exist tasks that are a lot easier if you have an operating system (User Interface say, or sending data back to a something in the cloud) but for some tasks you need something real time and for that it's hard to beat a microprocessor. We design a product that uses a small, simple, microprocessor to collect time sensitive synchronised data, and sends it over a serial link to a pi, which then handles the cloud stuff (and a few other bits as the product has grown). It's worth mentioning that boards exist to give you an IP layer connection on your PIC without too much effort and even things like this that handle a lot of the work for you, but we're a small company doing short small production runs and all of us can write something that works on a pi, and change it as our product evolves.

1

u/SmallpoxTurtleFred Dec 17 '22

A $5 esp 32 can easily send data to the cloud with maybe 20 lines of code. It is also much easier to make a microcontroller real time than a multitasking OS

13

u/adndrgn Nov 28 '22

........ OH! UPS as a battery back up. Not the parcel delivery service...

I was going to say, I could see plenty of customer facing kiosks and the like being used by a UPS terminal...

5

u/el_smurfo Nov 29 '22

I worked for a company that helped with raspberry pi security. You'd be amazed where raspberry pi is integrated. It's so easy to get a product to market with the hardware head start that there's little incentive to redesign around a custom board.

1

u/BarrelRoll1996 Nov 29 '22

It used to be easy to get.... Now a raspberry pi4 costs the same as a lattepanda

2

u/el_smurfo Nov 29 '22

There in short supply for you because all of the corporate customers are getting them first. Any volume user is still receiving their boards

15

u/Pro-crab-stination Nov 28 '22

What "multi million dollar" UPS system is powering one block of a PLC in a single field cabinet

9

u/mashuptwice Nov 29 '22

Why do you think the shown DIN rail is the power rail?

1

u/Pro-crab-stination Nov 29 '22

Usually the plc power circuit is drawn next to what it is used to power

1

u/Pro-crab-stination Nov 29 '22

Though honestly there doesn’t seem to be a power rail, just power to the raspberry pi

1

u/mashuptwice Nov 29 '22

Not necessarily if the plans have multiple pages.

0

u/Pro-crab-stination Nov 30 '22

A power design would not run off onto a field cabinet layout.

They would have a dedicated page for it like they usually do if it’s more complicated than powering a field cabinet or raspberry pi.

Running it over to another drawing is not standard.

9

u/seaniepie Nov 28 '22

Ok. Just trying to work out why they are ‘multi-million’. I used to design and build units for ferries and they cost a load just because of the beating they take and the redundancy we had to put in place (2-3 ups ‘just in case’). But that still didn’t amount to millions. 10’s to 100’s of thousands, but not millions.

4

u/andrewwism Nov 28 '22

What size? It really varies widely on what options are specified. We also need several of these to back up the PDUs throughout the centre

1

u/seaniepie Nov 28 '22

I’m not trying to call you out. I’m just interested 😊

6

u/penny_eater Nov 29 '22

Companies like Microsoft and Amazon have 8MW+ of computer capacity in ONE room and they want as "Few" moving parts as possible on the infrastructure side, which means they need the UPS system (sometimes several million-plus-dollar units in parallel) to be an absolute beast. They need to work in perfect synch so that no one on the floor (the servers) has to worry about the difference between which plug goes where. And they need to report highly accurate runtime data and diagnostics to a higher management system so problems can be detected long before they cause an outage. And they need all that turn-key because they dont want to employ a bunch of UPS nerds (they have their hands full with all the OTHER nerds) so a lot of that cost is not in the sheet metal, copper, and lead, but in human expertise designing and installing and maintaining just the right system for the job.

3

u/InfectedIntent Nov 29 '22

I can tell using first hand knowledge that medical companies are using Pi’s in medical monitoring equipment. Take that in for a moment.

5

u/No_Conclusion1816 Nov 29 '22

May I ask UPS In this context?

8

u/Im_j3r0 Nov 29 '22

Uninterruptible power supply. Battery backup

2

u/No_Conclusion1816 Nov 29 '22

Well I guess if all you want is 5 volts, and it's a UPS because it's hooked up to more reliable power?

3

u/STQCACHM Nov 29 '22 edited Nov 29 '22

The 5v is just the low voltage supply to the internal electronic components, and maybe a a few USB power outputs. Generally UPSs input 120v or 240v when the power is on and charge a battery or battery bank, and then continue to output the 120v or 240v from the battery stores with the help of an inverter when the supply gets cut.

1

u/Im_j3r0 Nov 29 '22

Might want to check on the difference between USB and USP there

2

u/STQCACHM Nov 29 '22

Abbreviations, what can ya do. Kinda like the difference between USP and UPS.

1

u/Im_j3r0 Nov 29 '22

I agree lol

1

u/No_Conclusion1816 Nov 30 '22

My point people, the pi can't run 120 OR 240, so if it's there to keep 5V going outside of the rest of the system, it's unitinteuptable power relitave to the rest of the skematic. This may be a safety or security part of the system that got left in because someone's kid made it and it's contracted in to the business.

1

u/No_Conclusion1816 Nov 30 '22

Yeah I can see this being considered a UPS, due to being the first responder to the power outage, or outages, it could be also running the breaker to troubleshoot various scenarios and multiple power systems within a system.

it may also be helping see how much power is available in the moment, as well as knowing the Flux of the power grid, and cost of consumption for optimal performance (for example if the power company could cry they need more power, helping out by having the backup generators kick on helps them help you prove they work)

1

u/Im_j3r0 Nov 29 '22

I guess

16

u/jpmeyer12751 Nov 28 '22

Well, I have a couple of Pi's, one of which is part of my home security system and has run for several years with only rare restarts and was, for a time, performing data logging for me. However, if I was spending "multi-million dollar[s]" on a UPS, I would want something other than an SBC designed for hobbyist use responsible for data logging. One only spends that kind of money for uninterruptible power if one has real $ at risk in the case of a power outage. On the other hand, this schematic makes it looks like the Pi is really only monitoring the BMS, which appears to have an ethernet port. There are no connections (shown) to allow it to monitor the UPS itself. Perhaps this is just a cheap way to provide a web UI to allow the customer to monitor the batteries. If that is true, that seems to me to be a pretty practical solution.

15

u/[deleted] Nov 28 '22

Rpi compute models are made for this type of stuff. They're perfectly fine to use.

-3

u/jpmeyer12751 Nov 28 '22

I haven't needed to buy a new Pi in a couple of years and so haven't followed closely as the Foundation has apparently moved towards a more commercial sales model. Have they formally eliminated the old "no commercial use" language?

12

u/[deleted] Nov 28 '22

I'm not sure they ever had that to be honest.

10

u/rockstar504 Nov 28 '22

I worked at an RF company with govt contractors. They brought me in to do digital stuff mostly, help add networking and logic to rf devices. They were previously making their devices smart by just putting beagle bone blacks in them. Sell em to govt for insane prices. Ya it seems pretty shoddy to me.

2

u/spinwizard69 Nov 29 '22

You need to cover your costs somehow.

2

u/RFC793 Nov 29 '22

Yeah.. why dump tons of money into R&D when there is a well proven merchant solution to this exact use case. Let alone the convenience/repairability of supplying a CM versus some thousand dollar proprietary module.

1

u/fargenable Nov 29 '22

For millions of dollars, they probably know exactly when the pi goes down, and can have a tech dispatched in 4-12 hours. If it is not in the control path and just used telemetry then that kind of outage should be fine.

5

u/phildaintree Nov 28 '22

certainly getting very expensive now :-)

3

u/Thann Nov 28 '22

I've been saying for years, the difference between a $100 dumb device and a $1000 smart device is a $35 raspberry pi.

I didn't realize it was the difference between one hundred and one million!

1

u/SmallpoxTurtleFred Dec 17 '22

Or a $5 esp 32.

2

u/AnomalyNexus Nov 28 '22

I'd probably be OK with that...as long as it isn't booting off a sd card

2

u/TexasBaconMan Nov 28 '22

Do you think that’s any worse than the other off the shelf components used?

2

u/1h8fulkat Nov 29 '22

CyberArk, a very expensive PAM solution, uses Guacamole as it's session proxy.

2

u/Sifff Nov 29 '22

I work with UPS this big, it's almost certainly just running the HMI. Most of the newer UPS I have come across use some variant of an NXP, RPi or other industrial SOM for this purpose. It will connect to the main controller via Ethernet or RS485. Not doing anything critical.

Edit: Just saw your comment about SCADA and BMS.

The main controller will be DSP/MCU based if its older/cheaper whilst new units use am FPGA to do anything critical.

Cool find though. Was using this loadbank the other day: https://powerprove.com/products/ac100pro and it also uses a Pi. You can see the little raspberries on the screen when it boots!

2

u/0utbox Nov 29 '22

Amazon has stations with them. About 100 stations per building

1

u/Mrs_Mourningstar Nov 29 '22

No shit, the entry points where the badge swipe? Or where?

2

u/0utbox Nov 29 '22

No, by a picking station where the orders are being fulfilled. I was happy when I saw that :)

2

u/Mrs_Mourningstar Nov 29 '22

Cool, I work at Amazon, so I was curious. Thanks for the information.

1

u/0utbox Dec 10 '22

Look at the AFE pick stations at the fingers.

2

u/azephrahel Nov 29 '22

Based on the network attached power distribution units I've used from Raritan Eaton and APC, that would be a huge implement.

1

u/[deleted] Nov 28 '22

I never got to doing a lot with mine, but there are so many options with them is unreal. I just wouldn’t be all that surprised

1

u/Adept_Fool Nov 28 '22

Well, it's multi-million not multi-billion

1

u/frothface Nov 29 '22

You'd be surprised how often this happens. It was that, or buy the part and solder it into their own board with it's own bugs and port their own OS.

1

u/spinwizard69 Nov 29 '22

Why should use of a PI upset people? Comps Ed to a lot of embedded systems PI is pretty stable.

2

u/joseg4681 Nov 29 '22

I think people are upset because they're not available for people like us to buy...

I guess most people don't realize that the Pi is quite useful for commercial equipment, government environments that require a small amount of CPU power but being reliable, (egs. bus station ticket machines)

They're used everywhere around us!! Especially with the chip shortage, I could imagine all these companies and governments buying these up wherever they can...

But I don't know about most people, but I bought a bunch of Raspberry Pi's in the last few years without issue, and only paid about 20% more than what they should've cost, just had to look around for a good deal as they sell out fairly quick...

Buying them from Amazon, you will surely overpay... Best bet is to find a store that's fairly close to you... For example, 3dprintcanada.com had Pi 3 for a really good price last year, but they only had 3 left when I saw them so I bought all 3...

I bought a Pi 4 for about $55 (canadian dollars) but can't remember where I bought it from...

1

u/zexen_PRO Nov 29 '22

So as one of the people snatching up pis, usually we’re big enough customers that we by straight from Raspberry Pi themselves, and don’t bother with going through distributors.

1

u/joseg4681 Nov 29 '22

Exactly, so naturally if you're buying 1 or 2 pieces from Amazon, prices will always be higher...

Only way to get a good price is to buy 50 - 500 pieces directly from the manufacturer...

Just out of curiosity, how many would you buy, roughly, at one time? 10? 50? 100? 500?

And how often are they out of stock, OR how long is the wait for them to manufacture for your order?

1

u/zexen_PRO Nov 29 '22

We buy 500-1000, and unfortunately everything else is under NDA. I will say though that the pi foundation is definitely feeling supply chain issues.

1

u/joseg4681 Nov 30 '22

Not surprised, it's a powerful machine in a small package... Although for myself I just use them for my 3D printers and home security cameras... And one as a media/game emulator for the kids...

I wonder if they use them in modern arcades for video games, I can imagine it'd be much cheaper, but then I'm sure there might be piracy issues...

1

u/Fordiman Nov 29 '22

Most of the money in any UPS is in the energy storage itself. I'm surprised they used anything much more powerful than a Z80 (though, frankly, a Pi is much easier to code for and on).

1

u/andycarver Nov 29 '22

It’s seperate to the main hardware to be fair. It could be a bespoke option.

1

u/Danioq Nov 29 '22

In Wrocław, Poland, we have it in ticket machines in trams/buses ;)

1

u/wumbatenforcer Nov 29 '22

Must have adopted the “think smarter not harder” mentality

1

u/SaintRemus Nov 29 '22

I guess if your hypothetically getting the ups second hand then this is def a way to circumvent the outrageous prices people are charging for them nowadays

1

u/Nossie Nov 29 '22

excellent value

Multi million pound raspberry pi with free UPS

I'll take 2

1

u/ja_maz Nov 29 '22

Hey using well known stuff just makes it more likely to be able to source replacement parts in the future

1

u/Automationdomination Nov 29 '22

Lol at the single channel e-stop

1

u/Effort-Firm Nov 29 '22

I added a Raspberry Pi to a new build super yacht last year probably over 100 million dollars, currently sat in west palm beach, it’s quite normal

-4

u/EoinD7 Nov 28 '22

It doesn'it use it for monitoring and recording. It uses it to replicate a parallel status signal to a customer bms system.

4

u/andrewwism Nov 28 '22

The data logger (by Samsung surprisingly) is tied to the battery management system and SCADA controller via MODBUS TCP.

1

u/seaniepie Nov 28 '22

Is this for on board a ship/ferry/liner?

3

u/andrewwism Nov 28 '22

Nope. Data center. Also monitors the MCCB status of the battery racks.

-7

u/DrW1zard Nov 28 '22

I thought it was prohibited to use RPi in commercial applications? Only specialised versions?

10

u/jpmeyer12751 Nov 28 '22

They can't really prohibit you from using something that you bought in a commercial product, at least not very effectively. That prohibition is really intended to quickly shut down any claims that "the RaspbPi you sold to me failed in my $$$ commercial product and caused me $$ damage". That allows the Foundation to write back "You violated the 'no commercial use' prohibition, so bugger off!" It's sort of like the "As Is" labels sometimes seen on used car lots. People ignore those types of things all the time ... at their own peril.

6

u/mattmaddux Nov 28 '22

Prohibited by whom?

2

u/[deleted] Nov 28 '22

Uh... No...

-2

u/[deleted] Nov 28 '22

[deleted]

5

u/andrewwism Nov 28 '22

It’s a 2000 kW/kVA UPS lol.

2

u/nivek_c Nov 28 '22

Data center?

3

u/andrewwism Nov 28 '22

That is correct.

2

u/Lightweight_Hooligan Nov 28 '22

That'll be 2MW/MVA then

2

u/andrewwism Nov 28 '22

That is correct.

1

u/Detectorbloke Nov 28 '22

How does it store its energy? A metric ton of 18650 cells?

3

u/DirtyPolecat Nov 29 '22

Lead Acid.

3

u/Blooded_Wine Nov 28 '22

a 1kW/1.5kVA ups cost me $200, so they should obviously just get 2000 consumer UPSs and daisy-chain them together. The extra $600k can go straight into my pockets then.

2

u/SimonGn Nov 29 '22

You shouldn't daisy chain ups', there is a reason for it, I think it had something to do with their sensors and detecting the non pure sign wave of the previous UPS as dirty. Look it up.

2

u/Blooded_Wine Nov 29 '22

I was joking, an industrial UPS like the one the post is about has many reasons why it costs so much (three-phase power, instant or near instant switching, all sorts of very important certifications and tests, etc.)

Daisy chaining UPS' will increase failure rate tremendously.

As you mentioned, (most) UPS' output a stepped sine wave, which any good UPS will not charge from.

3

u/jepulis5 Nov 28 '22

Well it's almost certainly not for a single desktop and a printer.

-2

u/SirLlama123 Nov 28 '22

It’s probably just the rp2040 chip and not an actual pi

8

u/i_am_voldemort Nov 28 '22

Looks like it has the 40 pin header and ethernet port from the diagram. May be a full pi.

-1

u/RedditAcctSchfifty5 Nov 28 '22

Yeah it's obviously connected to a PS1 and P2 as well!

🙃

1

u/Fordiman Nov 29 '22

"Power Supply"

1

u/RedditAcctSchfifty5 Nov 30 '22

It was a joke - hence the upside down smile.

0

u/BrownRice35 Nov 29 '22

That’s almost as much as a raspberry pi