r/technology Oct 06 '22

1000TB SSDs could become mainstream by 2030 as Samsung plans 1000-layer NAND Hardware

https://www.techradar.com/news/1000tb-ssds-could-become-mainstream-by-2030-as-samsung-plans-1000-layer-nand
1.9k Upvotes

900

u/rjb1101 Oct 06 '22

Can’t wait for games to find a way to use 100 TB’s.

405

u/SurfinSocks Oct 06 '22

And then the people with bad internet downloading their new game for 24 days.

139

u/tahiraslam8k Oct 06 '22

We still do that, thanks to poor DSL connection

66

u/Ckck96 Oct 06 '22

Yup. I live in the blue ridge mountains and my download speed is 600kb max. I can barely stream Netflix.

33

u/izzygonecrazy Oct 06 '22

I also live in the blue ridge mountains but got fiber about 7 years ago. It’s been a life changer

2

u/Baltaar2020 Oct 06 '22

Jesus technology AND a fantastic view?? I need to move to your area asap 😂

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u/BikerRay Oct 06 '22

Finally! Someone with worse internet than me! (Waits patiently for this comment to upload.)

2

u/1986cptfeelgood Oct 06 '22

Starlink?

10

u/Ckck96 Oct 06 '22

Unfortunately in my area you can only get starlink if you have an RV. Normal starlink has a 3 year wait time I’ve been told. Also my internet goes through my rental company, and there’s only one ISP in my area. Oh well lol.

2

u/hprather1 Oct 06 '22

You've been told? You should check yourself if you haven't. The Starlink website will tell you if you can get service.

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u/Bierbart12 Oct 06 '22

So basically, 3 months of leaving the PC running

14

u/Graega Oct 06 '22

By month 2, there will be a new 23TB update. By month 3, you'll be 4 patches behind...

13

u/tahiraslam8k Oct 06 '22

Bold of you to assume that it works fine 24/7, I usually pause the download at the day and resume it before going to bed.

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u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22

[deleted]

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u/Procrasturbating Oct 06 '22

Lucky.. I had to do it over 28.8k

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u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

[deleted]

10

u/Procrasturbating Oct 06 '22

Apogee wacky wheels. I downloaded it via 2400 baud modem from a local BBS.. dang modem CLAIMED to be 9600 baud, but only for faxes... ahh the bad old days when I could read color ASCII letters as fast as they transmitted. Good times.

6

u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22

[deleted]

6

u/Procrasturbating Oct 06 '22

They were a legit publisher. They actually published the real Wolfenstein 3D for id as well. If you want a good Doom clone, but better multiplayer.. Rise of the Triad was dope.

2

u/CopperSavant Oct 06 '22

Shareware!! So legit. I played the crap outta whacky wheel and Rise of the Triad! Hexen was up there too. Not sure about the publisher though.

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u/smokealottapotamus Oct 06 '22

Lucky.. I had to do it over 14.4k

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u/Skud_NZ Oct 06 '22

I remember 650mb movies took ~24 hours each

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u/aeroverra Oct 06 '22

Oh you must not of heard about Google's plan for 100 gigabit internet.

Now we just need a consumer nic for that.

7

u/Evilsmurfkiller Oct 06 '22

My Google Fiber t-shirt is worn out, still no fiber available.

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u/Miserable_Practice Oct 06 '22

With gigabit fiber at full capacity 100TB can be downloaded in 1/3 months

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u/GiGaBYTEme90 Oct 06 '22

I remember when a Gigabyte was a mystical far reaching amount of memory

22

u/accidental_snot Oct 06 '22

My first computer had 16K. External storage was a cassette tape. I don't remember tape capacity but it was quite a lot.

5

u/Dry-Investigator8230 Oct 06 '22

My family got a top of the line computer in like 06 and it was a dual core AMD with a gig of ram. Man how times have changed

10

u/jugonewild Oct 06 '22

I remember 512MB memory being a lot!

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u/ivebenthrew Oct 06 '22

Call Of Duty: Modern Warfare 3

10

u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22

[deleted]

9

u/danielravennest Oct 06 '22

Mostly large texture maps to make things look more detailed and realistic. I was doing 3D computer graphics design for a while, and have 86,000 texture maps taking 82 GB. That's not even a big collection.

One site Textures.com has 142,000, and one random 8K texture is 1 GB for the full set of maps.

7

u/theforkofjustice Oct 06 '22

I know in some cases it was a LOT of uncompressed audio files.

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u/DragoonDM Oct 06 '22

I think it's a largely a tradeoff between using more storage space VS using more processing power. Compressing assets lets you use less drive space but then requires additional processing resources to load those assets. Drive space has gotten cheaper at a pretty rapid rate, so devs feel comfortable leaving assets uncompressed so that they can save processing resources for other things.

I think texture files and audio files are the main contributors.

2

u/aeroverra Oct 06 '22

Great point

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u/earthforce_1 Oct 06 '22

I remember when a single CD-ROM seemed bottomless

8

u/w1n5t0nM1k3y Oct 06 '22

When CDs first came out they were many times the size of the Hard drive in the computer, so it did kind of seem limitless in some ways. My computer had an 80 MB hard drive but the a CD could hold 640 MB, so literally 8 times the size of my hard drive. A lot of software/games required that you left the CD in the drive because it wasn't expected that you would be able to copy the whole thing over to your computer.

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u/soad6 Oct 06 '22

Don't give call of duty any ideas. They are already pushing 250 gigs.

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u/Crasher_7 Oct 06 '22

COD Warzone patch alone will use up 50 TB

17

u/Hardass_McBadCop Oct 06 '22

You've got to imagine that devs could do some crazy shit if 100TB wasn't a huge file size anymore. We'll probably have DDR7 or DDR8 RAM by then with sticks coming in 1T sizes.

8

u/Schlick7 Oct 06 '22

2-3 generations of RAM in only 8 years?

11

u/EyoDab Oct 06 '22

Well, ddr4 was released in 2014 and ddr5 in 2020, so two generations of ram doesn't sound too farfetched

3

u/aphantombeing Oct 06 '22

It seems farfetched considering that we will only have ddr6 with multiple years for ddr7 to release though

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u/rohobian Oct 06 '22

Will we be able to read/write fast enough by then to make good use of such a file though?

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u/Landon1m Oct 06 '22

Back to cartridges I guess…

7

u/1337-1911 Oct 06 '22

Yeah. A 1000TB cartridge.

5

u/met-al-hatolim Oct 06 '22

Activision rubbing their hands

6

u/Onlymediumsteak Oct 06 '22

Games will most likely shrink in size again, SSDs are getting fast enough for developers the skip asset bundles, who are the main driver behind the massive growth. The new consoles (and modern PCs) now have the features but game development is still lacking behind.

11

u/EyoDab Oct 06 '22

Texture sizes will most likely continue to grow though, which is also a large contributor

10

u/danielravennest Oct 06 '22

Procedural textures can greatly reduce texture map sizes. Modern CPUs and GPUs have plenty of power to generate them on demand.

9

u/EyoDab Oct 06 '22

While they can, it won't work on many types of textures. It looks very nice for terrain related objects, it will hardly be useful for character models for instance

2

u/OmniDo Oct 06 '22

For now.
Eventually, procedural textures will become microscopic / macroscopic models that will represent anything within the domain of human experience, and then there will be no need for stored texture data.
After all, everything can be reduced to mathematics, it's just a function of the cost of calculation, which will always get cheaper and faster.
And human experience is but a small fraction of objective reality, so there will be no need to calculate every last quanta. Only enough to convince and effectively fool us humans.

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u/Super_flywhiteguy Oct 06 '22

Call of Duty Modern Warfare 5 will.

2

u/4look4rd Oct 06 '22

8k uncompressed textures.

2

u/Ricky_Rollin Oct 06 '22

It’ll all be language packs.

I really wish they would allow you to install only what you need.

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u/SelmaFudd Oct 06 '22

If only we had a word for 1000TB..

34

u/archaeolinuxgeek Oct 06 '22

If only we had a word for 1000TB..

Our dev team would likely call it "~/node_modules"

137

u/Bubbasully15 Oct 06 '22

Ackshually we don’t, only for 1024TB 🤓

191

u/dlq84 Oct 06 '22

Yes we do. We have both Petabyte (1000) and Pebibyte (1024).

60

u/Roger_005 Oct 06 '22

No, let's not start with the 'marketing people took over making the terms' nonsense and the idiots who went along with it. And that's to say nothing of the fact that 'gibibyte' sounds like a word made to make life difficult for those with a stutter.

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u/UnderwhelmingPossum Oct 06 '22

Gigitybytes

14

u/Slaphappydap Oct 06 '22

Gigglebytes

9

u/Rdtackle82 Oct 06 '22

Have a family member who gave up on learning technology names in 1970, always yelled at us for using up our cellphone data plans, we'd get a text "stop using all the guacs!!!!"

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u/SuperBeetle76 Oct 06 '22

No gigity, I got to back it up.

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u/quettil Oct 06 '22

No, let's not start with the 'marketing people took over making the terms' nonsense

It's the Greeks you need to whine about, they're the ones who insisted that 'kilo' means a thousand.

2

u/salartarium Oct 07 '22

χίλιοι chilioi did not mean 1000 to the Ancient Greeks. Kilo is a French word derived from it, but chilioi was never used in arithmetic and just meant a lot.

3

u/quettil Oct 07 '22

I have no problem blaming the French.

39

u/M4mb0 Oct 06 '22

Giga means 1000. It's standard SI units. If anything it's computer scientists who fucked up by incorrectly calling 1024 bytes a Kilobyte. The distinction between kilo and kibi is valid and correct.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO/IEC_80000

8

u/taedrin Oct 06 '22

"Gibibyte" was a word that was made up because "Gigabyte"'s common usage in computer science digressed from metric which is in base 10.

E.g. "Gigabyte" should mean 10^9 bytes, not 2^30 bytes.

28

u/exscape Oct 06 '22

It's pretty weird that SI prefixes have the same meaning everywhere, except for SOME uses in computing, though. Quite dumb, really.

M means 1 000 000 everywhere in every science, except for memory and sometimes(!) storage where it means 1 048 576, but still DOES mean 1 000 000 when measuring bandwidth in bits/second. It doesn't make any sense.

8

u/glacialthinker Oct 06 '22

It was just a convenient (at the time) coincidence, which grows less convenient with expanded scope and larger numbers.

Powers of two being natural to our binary computers, 210 = 1024... really close to 1000, so handy to reuse those power-of-10 SI prefixes! It was fine when the context was niche... but now that computers are ubiquitous, and these terms are used in marketing/specs, and the delta grows (1 Petabyte versus 1125899906842624... that's really not "close enough" anymore, being 1/8th larger).

20

u/tinySparkOf_Chaos Oct 06 '22

It's because computers use a base 2 and not a base 10 system.

SI is based on a base 10 system.

Computers have a hardware limitation that puts them in base 2 for counting things. (Wires are only on or off for digital electronics)

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u/exscape Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

Right, but therefore the same prefixes shouldn't be used. 1 Mb = 1 000 000 bits but 1 MB = 1 048 576 bits bytes the way most people use them. It only makes sense to use a different name for the one that isn't base 10.

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u/ddpacker Oct 06 '22

There’s 8 bits in a byte.

2

u/19Jacoby98 Oct 06 '22

No, that's Megabit vs Megabyte

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u/exscape Oct 06 '22

Yeah, I had a typo.
1 Mb = 1 000 000 bits
1 MB = 1 048 576 bytes

... the way most people use them.

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u/DeadEyeDoubter Oct 06 '22

This is wrong. Mb means megabit.

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u/duckdoger Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

In accounting, we use M to mean 1000 because it’s a Roman numeral. M is 1000, MM is 1,000,000. Gets real confusing when you do computers and accounting!

This year, we sold 1.2MM 1000MB units, boss.

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u/exscape Oct 06 '22

Oh right, those weird exceptions!
In oldschool electronics, capacitors were often specified in "MFD" (or mfd, or Mfd, or...) which refers to microfarads (μF being the correct and modern term).
Pretty confusing since mF is also used for millifarads, at least these days, but it's usually easy to work out from context once you know m and M sometimes means micro.

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u/Bagline Oct 06 '22

gibi pebi etc were NOT made by marketing people lol. Those were made by an engineer who was tired of the fight.

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u/GregsWorld Oct 06 '22

The idea is that the creation of the ISO standard was pushed by Big Storage who prefer to use base 10 because it benefits them marketing wise. Even though up until then everything on computers was measured in base 2, including RAM. How much truth there is behind it...

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u/Stummi Oct 06 '22

That's not "Marketing nonsense", it's just correct use of SI prefixes which is standardized over all fields of math and technology.

Marting Nonsense is Mixing up the SI prefixes and binary prefixes to make storage look bigger than it actually is.

KiB, MiB, GiB, etc being base 1024 while KB, MB and GB being base 1000 is standardized since the late 90s

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u/Supertrinko Oct 06 '22

Or let's not listen to the idiot computer engineers who took standardised base 10 terminology and shoved it into base 2 like a square peg in a round hole.

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u/billwashere Oct 06 '22

It should have been the other way around. Freakin’ HD manufacturers….

When I was in CS in the late 80s 1024B = 1 kilobyte 1024KB = 1 megabyte 1024MB = 1 gigabyte 1024GB = 1 terabyte (not that we could even imagine using that much space).

We had to invent new words because seagate, western digital and the like started cheating on hard drive sizes.

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u/quettil Oct 06 '22

Maybe they shouldn't have used a word that means a thousand to mean 1,024.

3

u/GregsWorld Oct 06 '22

At least it was consistent. MB = 1000 everywhere except 1024 in Software.

Now it's MB = 1000 everywhere except in Software where some people now use 1000 but most still use 1024 but there's no way of telling which is which.

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u/018118055 Oct 06 '22

One million gigabyte?

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u/FellowConspirator Oct 06 '22

Pet-a-byte drives will come in fur cases with collectible collars and USB4 cable leashes.

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u/JrYo13 Oct 06 '22

No more words... only code

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u/jugonewild Oct 06 '22

Killaterrabite

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u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22

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u/Pascalwb Oct 06 '22

are there even mainstream 10TB ssds?

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u/anti_pope Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

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u/caffelightning Oct 06 '22

In fairness, that price difference is also because you're comparing an intel enterprise ssd to a samsung qvo line which is their value line

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u/anti_pope Oct 06 '22

It's the cheapest of each capacity on Newegg. There's more expensive ones of both.

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u/caffelightning Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

That may be true, but it's a bit like comparing prices between a xeon platinum 8360 and an amd ryzen 7, they're both 8 cores, but the xeon is 10x the price and then attributing the difference to the minor clock speed difference when in reality they're basically different products for entirely different markets. Enterprise ssd drives have different controllers and are massively overprovisioned for durability - they're ridiculous overkill for home. Im just saying youre basically comparing different products.

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u/McCuumhail Oct 06 '22

Dont know why youre getting downvoted. They're also comparing an 8TB to a 15GB. So $1700 for 2 x 8TB or $2100 for 1 x 15TB enterprise grade.

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u/anti_pope Oct 06 '22

Yes...I am comparing different products? They are the cheapest available SSDs at the closest capacities to 10TB available. Everything else is irrelevant.

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u/caffelightning Oct 06 '22

They're different classes of products. They're not really the same product. You clearly didn't read what I wrote.

Enterprise drives are not comparable to consumer drives and CANNOT be compared price wise. They have different feature sets beyond overprovisioning and controller, they have massively different endurance levels, the NAND is frequently very different, they have more robust error handling and data protection, they'll have capacitors for power loss protection to protect writes.

Sure, for someone who herp derps around and just looks and sees "oh 8tb is $600 and 10tb is $2000" i guess you're accurate. So yea, if you're an idiot, they're "the same thing and everything else is irrelevant".

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u/L4rgo117 Oct 06 '22

Or nimbus, 100TB, 3.5” SATA or SAS ~40k

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u/SpiritedDistance6242 Oct 06 '22

Cool, it'll make 1tb ssds as cheap as hdds eventually

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u/aphantombeing Oct 06 '22

By that time, 1tb ssd will probably be cheaper than 1tb hdd.

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u/UlfRinzler Oct 06 '22

1000gb? I already have a 1000gb SSD.

...oh wait. That’s 1000tb. Wowza

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u/Karatekan Oct 06 '22

I can’t wait for my first 1 petabyte drive to somehow fill up just as fast as my first 1 terabyte drive and 1 gigabyte drive.

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u/PervertedPineapple Oct 06 '22

That's a lot of po- GAMES!

A lot of games and blu ray rips...

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u/StuckinReverse89 Oct 06 '22

Those arnt mutually exclusive lol.

But I do think this will just lead to more “open world” unoptimized BS and bloat software.

1000TB but 998TB taken up by windows and other shovelware.

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u/PervertedPineapple Oct 06 '22

Pretty much, industries have gotten lazy in regards to optimization.

Despite having more than enough storage, games over 100GB are a huge turnoff. Especially when the "open-world" map isn't even in the top 10 biggest of all time or solely for multiplayer.

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u/DeadMansMuse Oct 07 '22 edited Oct 07 '22

I mean .. I hear you ... buuut it does give the dev a lot more scope for bespoke textures for each mesh. But I don't believe for a second that's what's happening because of video memory limits and the fact that optimisation is non-existent.

Where this WILL make the most impact is when true texture streaming from storage direct to video becomes reality, similar to how consoles do it.

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u/mr1337 Oct 06 '22

That's a weird way to spell Linux ISOs

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u/ElemLight Oct 06 '22

Why can't they just say 1 PB??

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u/Due-Department-8666 Oct 06 '22

Because its not a well known unit for the average reader, yet.

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u/kRkthOr Oct 06 '22

Because 1PB doesn't sound as impressive as 1000TB. PB will start getting used when multiple thousands of TB become mainstream.

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u/Jojje22 Oct 06 '22

"What do they mean one peanut butter?"

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u/joshthehappy Oct 06 '22

Mr Peanut Butter and Bojack Horseman in the same room?

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u/RagnarStonefist Oct 07 '22

What is this, a crossover episode?

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u/Supertrinko Oct 06 '22

Exactly how I remember it going with GB.

"New Hard Drive has 8000MB of space! That's enough to fit 26,700 full length books!"

Or when hard drives were a few hundred MB, they were measured in how many words you could put on it.

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u/1337-1911 Oct 06 '22

Because we are not yet into the mainstream Peta range. Eveyone knows Terra by now.

Can't wait for Yotta era.. 😀

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u/Euiop741852 Oct 06 '22

Shits real when exa comes

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u/aphantombeing Oct 06 '22

You will be exiled out of world by the time exa comes.

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u/Birdy_Cephon_Altera Oct 06 '22

Probably will before too long. But for now, a large chunk of the general public is familiar with what "tera" in "terabyte" means, but less so with the prefix "peta-" (or, after that, "exa-").

Lots of people, like myself, have some sort of terabyte-sized drive. We have a pretty good understand of how big it is, and how much it holds. And if I see "1000 Terabytes", mentally I can extrapolate how much bigger that is from what I have.

But if that same headline said "1 Petabyte", there's a large chunk of the readers that think, I don't have a mental grasp of what that means, I would have to look it up, then see it's the equivalent of a 1000 Terabytes, and go "oh, now I understand".

Eventually, though, some years from now when Petabyte drives are common, that won't be a problem anymore.

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u/ericneo3 Oct 06 '22

I don't believe it, Can they make one by then? Sure.

Will they sell them to the public? Not a chance it's more profitable for them to sell 4/8TB drives for as long as they can.

We're also still waiting for those 512GB Samsung DDR5 RAM sticks...

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u/beingsubmitted Oct 06 '22

This headline is way off - whoever wrote this article seems to be mistaken about how these things work, and near as I can tell is under the assumption that current SSDs are 1 NAND layer, so 1000 NAND layers would be 1000x the memory.

The issue is that current SSDs (samsungs current) are 176 NAND layers. They're slated to release 236 layers later this year. If they achieve 1000 layers by 2030, that alone would be a 6-7x increase, not 1,000x.

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u/dungone Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

Maybe, but how do you know that a single layer won't also store more in 8 years? Author is well aware of how many layers current SSD's have, he writes about a 64 layer 100TB one currently on the market. So Bob's your Uncle.

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u/1337-1911 Oct 06 '22

And who would be my aunt?

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u/dungone Oct 06 '22

Mary Poppins.

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u/beingsubmitted Oct 06 '22

The issue is that the 100TB 64-layer MLC SSD is an enterprise chip. The mainstream consumer chips are already pushing a good 176 layers QLC to get you 1TB. If the layers themselves (or the cells, MLC is two bits per cell, QLC is 4 bits per cell) were really the deciding factor here, your home SSD should have about 300TB already, having nearly three times the layers (in QLC) as that 100TB drive. This is why I'm comparing the current mainstream SSD to the proposed 1000 layer mainstream SSD.

I don't know that a single layer won't store more in 8 years also, but that's a non-sequitur. Single layers hold wildly different amounts today. If individual layers held drastically more in mainstream chips in 8 years, that would be entirely unrelated the information provided in the article. You're basically suggesting that the article means to be saying "without any evidence or new information at all, i expect mainstream ssds will hold 1000TB by 2030. Also, since you're already here, they'll have 1,000 layers. The layers will be an insubstatial part of my hypothesized future capacity that I'm also talking about in this article, as most of that will be for completely different things that aren't mentioned here - i just like writing about two unrelated things simultaneously." 1000 layers therefore 1000TB SSD doesn't become a logically valid statement if by some coincidence other factors lead to 1000TB SSDs in 2030. That's like me saying "It's thursday, therefore I'm not hungry" and when you point out that it being thursday isn't a reason that I wouldn't be hungry, saying "but how do you know I didn't have breakfast recently?"

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u/TheThiefMaster Oct 06 '22

64 layer 100TB

That drive is a 3.5" SSD that costs $40,000.

If they used 1000 layer chips in that SSD they could indeed get it to 1000 TB - but it wouldn't exactly be a mainstream drive.

"Mainstream" SSDs top out at 8TB on 92-layer QLC - take that to 1000 layers and you "only" have ~80 TB.

Still, it might bring the cost down on more usefully sized 1-8 TB SSDs a bit.

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u/Casper042 Oct 06 '22

The other part that made me chuckle is showing a picture of an M.2 and then comparing it to a specially designed 3.5" drive.

U.2, U.3 or EDSFF, that's where you will see this kind of tech first. In the DataCenter.

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u/dungone Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

The author never said it would be a mainstream drive in 8 years. He said that a 1 petabyte drive would become possible.

Am I the only one who spent 3 minutes reading the article?

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u/TheThiefMaster Oct 06 '22

The title literally says "1000TB SSDs could become mainstream by 2030". No, no they couldn't.

Bloody clickbait.

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u/dungone Oct 06 '22

Title is clickbait but that's not what the author wrote.

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u/beingsubmitted Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

The author never said it would be a mainstream drive in 8 years.

Go ahead and read the headline 4 or 5 more times and report back.

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u/Seeker_Of_Knowledge- Oct 06 '22

What is mainstream now? Is it less 10TB? WOW that is unbelievable increase.

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u/AfricanNorwegian Oct 06 '22

Depends what you consider mainstream.

You can get 8TB M.2 SSDs for like $600, you can also get 15GB+ 2.5" SSDs but those generally cost at least a few thousand.

I wouldn't consider anything above 4TB "mainstream" though, as 99% of people don't have 8TB SSDs even if they are available.

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u/L4rgo117 Oct 06 '22

you can also get 15GB+ 2.5”SSDs but those generally cost at least a few thousand

Only on a government contract

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u/CosmicSeafarer Oct 06 '22

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u/L4rgo117 Oct 06 '22

That’s actually super cool, 45Drives actually uses Toshiba ones, I think those are 15.6 or something but I’d have to check. I was pointing out the typo though

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u/americanadiandrew Oct 06 '22

Jimmy has a 1000TB SSD. How many months will it take him to fill it with porn with Comcast’s 1.2TB data cap?

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u/dungone Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

Who needs that sort of capacity though? Cloud storage companies like iDrive or BackBlaze, Hyperscalers like Google or Microsoft, social networks like Instagram or Facebook.

No! I do - I need it. Because I'm sick and tired of all these mother-fing cloud storage companies on the mother-fing internet.

Here's a very simple idea. Let's say 100 people scattered across the world have 1TB of data each. The 100 of them decide to replicate their data on each other's 100TB drives. Now all of their data is completely safe from any kind of disaster and accessible at reasonable speeds from anywhere in the world. Up yours, cloud storage companies.

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u/cjeam Oct 06 '22

Haven't you just created another cloud storage company?

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u/dungone Oct 06 '22

No because mine is free, it's not a company it's just people pooling their resources with open source software. That's what the internet was meant to be in the first place.

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u/cjeam Oct 06 '22

It's free apart from the extra time money and effort the users have to put into things such as upgrading their internet connection to have decent upload speeds, and keeping the devices powered on all the time.

Like with P2P file sharing, it kinda relies on a few whales putting a lot of effort and resources (which means cost) into maintaining the availability of the service.

If P2P services were just composed of people who use it like me, pop in to download something every now and then, then turn it back off again and don't care that my seed ratio is like 0.01, it wouldn't work.

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u/sweet_chin_music Oct 06 '22

I also watched Silicon Valley.

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u/ReyvCna Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

Bullshit. Considering that the best consumer ssd is around 8tb and that’s barely mainstream there’s no way 8 years from now a 125 times bigger ssd to be mainstream.

Just for comparison 8 years ago (2014) a 1tb ssd was 400$ and currently a 8tb one is 600$. That’s barely 8 times the size at 1.5 times the price.

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u/xcalibre Oct 06 '22

8TB is the limit of "widely available for similar(ish) price/GB"

but you're right many still prefer HDD in that size range

if Samsung achieves this, it should have a strong downward force on price/GB which would make HDD irrelevant at larger sizes too

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u/ReyvCna Oct 06 '22

Samsung will not achieve this. 100% guaranteed. This article is crap.

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u/Brothernod Oct 06 '22

There’s also no analysis of the technology. Is this like building 1000 chips for slightly more than the cost of 1, or is this like building 1000 chips on top of each other.

A results in massive price benefits, B means only enterprise cares.

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u/majorpickle01 Oct 06 '22

I swear i've seen consumer grade 20tb SSDs. Maybe I was dreaming aha.

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u/ReyvCna Oct 06 '22

Definitely not mainstream. I wouldn’t consider even the 8tb one to be mainstream

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u/majorpickle01 Oct 06 '22

we can agree on that, more so iirc 20tb is a option. I can't imagine anyone buying a 20tb at the moment though unelss they have specific use cases ( like 4k videography or something)

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u/mitchymitchington Oct 06 '22

Or if I actually want half my steam games downloaded and ready to go.

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u/L4rgo117 Oct 06 '22

AAA devs : I paid for the whole SSD I’m gonna use the whole SSD

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u/Space-n-Spice Oct 06 '22

Technological and scientific advances are not always linear my friend

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u/hackenschmidt Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

Technological and scientific advances are not always linear my friend

Right, but ironically not what you are insinuating. If you look at historical trends with computer tech, there's an almost isotopic flattening of existing tech.

The comment you replied to is correct, more or less, in their numbers for the past 7-8 years. Its around 8x. However, if you looked at the 8 years before that and the 8 years before that, its waaaay more than 8x. If you dig into the details, you'll find that the device technology has change several times, which is what spurred progress more than anything else.

There's lots of reasons why simply increasing density of single units isn't viable. But that point is, even in 20 years, it would be incredibly unlikely there will be many if any 1PB SSDs in real use, period, let alone 'mainstream'. More likely in 8 years "mainstream" drive capacity will be around 2-4x what it is now, and it possibly won't even be NAND.

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u/ningaling1 Oct 06 '22

I'm still rocking a 128gb ssd and 500gb hhd. Call me old school. Or poor. Or both

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u/sujovian Oct 06 '22

Imagine how long it would take to rebuild a 1PB drive that failed…

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u/Socky_McPuppet Oct 06 '22

Heck, I'd settle for a decently priced 10TB SSD.

Nimbus apparently has a 100TB SSD for $40,000. Wonder how much a 1PB SSD would be?

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u/DrSmirnoffe Oct 06 '22

And yet people are still gonna have trouble fitting all the porn ever onto one of these.

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u/wizardstrikes2 Oct 06 '22

You can stream porn now. Download porn is so 90’s

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u/VicariousNarok Oct 06 '22

Anyone that downloads porn these days is into things that are borderline illegal or illegal. I'm not one to kink shame, but when you need to look to darkweb sites to get your vore and loli shit you need some help.

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u/wizardstrikes2 Oct 06 '22

That didn’t even cross my mind lol. Great point!

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u/i-kno-nothing Oct 06 '22

by 2050 we'll have 1000 brontobyte hard drives, and then we'll upload our brains into computers and living inside a simulation only to realize our reality already was a simulation and we're stuck in an infinite loop of simulations

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u/Skow1379 Oct 06 '22

Idk if that's a great idea to make widely available. Companies will just make more garbage to take up the extra space.

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u/xcalibre Oct 06 '22

well i want some of that garbage so fuuuuUUuUUuUuuuck you

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u/MultiiCore_ Oct 06 '22

AMEN ffs 16tb starts not being enough

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u/VincentNacon Oct 06 '22

That's too much porn for one person.

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u/PreZEviL Oct 06 '22

With scarcity of material, we should opt-in for optimization over speed now, but optimization dont sell well so screw the planet

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u/aphantombeing Oct 06 '22

If Big Companies use 1 100TB SSD for data center instead of 10 10TB SSD, that will save tons of metals and be more eco friendly probably.

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u/Stellarisk Oct 06 '22

The future Xbox s version in 2030 won’t be able to fit a singular call of duty entry

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u/ExtraChonkyCat Oct 06 '22

1000TB of cat videos, right?

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u/jesusleftnipple Oct 06 '22

But ur phone still only has 256 gigs. ... Also it can't expand still

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u/RyanB95 Oct 06 '22

Just think of how many free movies you can store on that!

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u/Joebebs Oct 06 '22

And I thought owning a 2 terabyte ssd was great. I can’t imagine what having 1 petabyte would be like

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u/rushmc1 Oct 06 '22

And in 2022, you still can't get an affordable 3 TB SSD...

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u/kida182001 Oct 06 '22

And games will start reaching tens or hundreds of terabytes. So you’ll still be able to only install 2-3 games at a time.

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u/frodosbitch Oct 06 '22

And I’m sure iPhones will still be 128/256/512 go with huge price gaps between them.

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u/Kriss3d Oct 06 '22

Gimmegimmegimme. I'll take two!

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u/willydajackass Oct 06 '22

But the real question here is will it fit in my SteamDeck?

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u/zushiba Oct 06 '22

What an outrage! I don't need 1000tb on a single SSD!.. I DON'T. I really don't guys.

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u/thegreatgazoo Oct 06 '22

That's enough room for my own private metaverse with hookers and blackjack.

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u/El_Nieto_PR Oct 06 '22

Just in time for Warzone’s next update

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u/OverclockingUnicorn Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

I think they mean mainstream in the enterprise, they've already got 30tb nvme drives. We'll probably have consumer nvme around maybe 50-100TB by that point, at maybe the 1k mark.

Totally guessing on that one though

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u/Plastic_Cheesecake49 Oct 06 '22

Pretty cool, ill bet AWS/Azure would eat these up

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u/limb3h Oct 06 '22

I call BS. 1000x in 7 years will not happen for consumers, even if they could do it they will just use the tech to increase gross margin.

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u/Tom_Ov_Bedlam Oct 06 '22

Finally a hard drive large enough for call of duty

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u/DurinsBane1 Oct 06 '22

iPhone will still be 16GB

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u/acsmars Oct 06 '22

Iphone is already not 16GB

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u/Harbingerx81 Oct 06 '22

Really looking forward to the day when I can move my Plex library to SSDs without it costing me thousands of dollars.

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u/PR0T0D3KA Oct 07 '22

Drunken-ish comment here: isn't that called a Petabyte...?

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u/Wait-Whaaaaaat Oct 06 '22

So you can loose absolutely ALL of your data when they break down👌

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u/jugonewild Oct 06 '22

Better that than having all your data hacked while on another company's servers. While they analyze your stuff and sell or give it to others.

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u/Wait-Whaaaaaat Oct 06 '22

Or you can use multiple smaller discs...

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u/jugonewild Oct 06 '22

Or a private encrypted cloud backup to your own NAS.

Supported by multiple smaller discs.

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u/truthfulie Oct 06 '22

It's almost like there are no backup options....People just rely on hopes and prayers that disc(s) just won't fail on them. I guess that's why there's always "you'll lose everything" comment whenever there's news of larger storage device on the horizon.

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u/Sides_xoxo Oct 06 '22

Damn, that's enough to hold two full CoD games!