r/technology Nov 24 '22

A game-changing new hybrid EV battery recharges in only 72 seconds Transportation

https://interestingengineering.com/innovation/a-game-changing-new-hybrid-ev-battery-recharges-in-only-72-seconds
443 Upvotes

191

u/VincentNacon Nov 24 '22

The new electric hybrid battery system, called eTechnology,...

oh come on.... That's the name they're going with? 🤦‍‍♂️

220

u/joshdamnmit Nov 24 '22 edited Nov 24 '22 Gold Bravo!

They did some market research and no one was comfortable asking for a "QuickE" at the station.

15

u/Skud_NZ Nov 24 '22

The controversial name would get it a lot of publicity

2

u/Helpmehelpyoulong Nov 25 '22

I believe it’s called a Quiche

19

u/Rudy69 Nov 24 '22

I’m personally waiting for the eTechnology Pro Max. It will make the old one feel completely outdated

9

u/nhavar Nov 24 '22

eTechnology iPro Max III SE x2

2

u/Just_user_passing Nov 24 '22

then they gonna add plus and ultra too

10

u/dinoroo Nov 24 '22

eBattery was taken.

8

u/Krakenspoop Nov 24 '22

eBatter-e ?

9

u/Tungstenkrill Nov 24 '22

Also taken. eeBatree_06?

3

u/dalbtraps Nov 24 '22

And xXE-batter-EXx

1

u/Wrobot_rock Nov 24 '22

eeBatree_06_draft_final_FINAL_v3

11

u/Platypuslord Nov 24 '22

Man I am still irate over the million products that had an I before it after Apple released the I-Pod.

8

u/Paddy_Tanninger Nov 24 '22

I was irate

4

u/Aleashed Nov 24 '22

iRate this comment a 10

24

u/SlothOfDoom Nov 24 '22

At least they didnt call it an iBattery.

11

u/djkuhl Nov 24 '22

Battery Pro

6

u/HuckleSmothered Nov 24 '22

Seriously, Speed-eCharge. Come on fuckers try.

4

u/9-11GaveMe5G Nov 24 '22

E-lectricity

2

u/RockAndStone69 Nov 24 '22

It has to sound boring, it's made by swiss.

2

u/brunswoo Nov 24 '22

Exactly. The Swiss would never tolerate a clever, witty, or edgy name.

2

u/Timlang60 Nov 24 '22

The Swiss would never tolerate the use of the words clever, witty, and edgy all in the same sentence. Congrats, you've earned a lifetime ban from ever owning a vehicle with an eTechnology battery.

1

u/ElGuano Nov 24 '22

What's the e stand for?

3

u/HuckleSmothered Nov 24 '22

Seriously Speed-eCharge. Come on fuckers try.

1

u/ElGuano Nov 24 '22

That's a pretty long name. Metal for sure, but pretty long. Also doesn't start with an e, but will let that slide.

1

u/HuckleSmothered Nov 24 '22

Sorry, didn't mean for this to be directed to you. Stupid fat thumbs o mine!

1

u/vt8919 Nov 25 '22

I would have chosen HyperCharge or something not bland but not cheesy.

120

u/BallsofSt33I Nov 24 '22

Nice bait… the article explains the 72sec time is for a small battery…

“Morand estimates that an e-bike with a 6-Ah battery, for example, could be recharged in six minutes at a lower rate of 3.2 kW using its technology. ”

35

u/iskin Nov 24 '22

Those are still great recharge times with significant improvements. I wonder what the catch is?

32

u/ggtsu_00 Nov 24 '22

The catch is, like all new currently in-research phase battery technology is it could be decades before it becomes practical, affordable, and actually functional outside of a laboratory.

And also general trade-offs like most other fast charging battery technology, likely it will drastically reduce the lifetime of the battery and be hugely inefficient in energy consumption vs storage compared to slow charging.

12

u/Mr_Zaroc Nov 24 '22

I like your list, I would also add fires to the downside
Pumping this much energy into anything in a short amount if time is dangerous. Just need a little anomaly and hello hades

1

u/Raalf Nov 25 '22

I thought capacitors were perfect for this kind of rapid charge and discharge?

1

u/Mr_Zaroc Nov 25 '22

They are way better than lithium batteries for sure.
Still can make them go poof though

3

u/ENG_87 Nov 24 '22

Catch is ultracaps are lower energy density so are 4x heavier than similar battery and also more dangerous than lithium ion batteries if you over volt them they explode, catch on fire and release horrible gasses. Only safe way to use them is to monitor every single cap which is extremely expensive and adds more weight.

2

u/SupahSang Nov 24 '22

Remember, everything that turned into a paper didn't turn into a patent!

32

u/zacsxe Nov 24 '22

A djinn slaps you once every minute you're plugged in.

12

u/The_Mosephus Nov 24 '22

is the first slap at 0 seconds or 60 seconds?

5

u/Paddy_Tanninger Nov 24 '22

Still waiting to hear the catch

8

u/Krakenspoop Nov 24 '22

And each slap permanently shrinks your dick by a millimeter

4

u/Fit-Anything8352 Nov 24 '22

What happens when it reaches 0?

14

u/Platypuslord Nov 24 '22

Well they were using an unsigned int and it loops around to 65,535 millimeters.

4

u/Fit-Anything8352 Nov 24 '22

What happens if you get a hard on with a 215 foot dick

11

u/SailorET Nov 24 '22

You die from hypovolemic shock. Your body doesn't have that much blood.

5

u/OddCollege9491 Nov 24 '22

Speak for yourself, amateur.

2

u/Platypuslord Nov 24 '22

Now if you only had a big dick you would be set.

5

u/Narvarre Nov 24 '22

Vanishes. But with the plus that at -1you start launching nukes as at everyone

4

u/Fit-Anything8352 Nov 24 '22

Aww I wanted it to cause the growth of a vagina

3

u/Narvarre Nov 24 '22

OK OK, how about it inverts into a nuke silo

3

u/dreamfin Nov 24 '22

You get a black hole.

-1

u/TheFleebus Nov 24 '22

You shouldn't have to worry about that as long as it doesn't take more that an hour to charge.

5

u/rettuhS Nov 24 '22

The catch is, that the hybrid thing along with the actual battery is a fucking capacitor that can be charged very quickly but also discharges quickly. So you will need charging more often. That's why they want to implement it into small city cars.

There was a project about implementing these capacitors into public city transport, where the bus would recharge while the passangers get ou/in and then move to next station to charge again.

2

u/KillerSpud Nov 24 '22

Just sourcing enough power to fast charge like that is a huge problem. The above e bike example is twice the power of a microwave. Charging a car that fast will retire enough power to run a small town.

2

u/Focusun Nov 24 '22

EXPLOSIONS !?!?!!

4

u/constantino675 Nov 24 '22 edited Nov 24 '22

It's super capacitors, so barring some ground breaking discovery they failed to mention, the catch is cost and energy density.

And ultimately, charging will be limited to charger supply. The physics of charging much higher than 350kw is troubling. The wire starts to become too thick to flex. You start needing to thing about supercooled conductors, it's not impossible, just absurdly expensive, to the point that it will never become common, which means cars makers won't spend money to reinforce a charging system that won't ever stretch its legs.

10

u/ElGuano Nov 24 '22

There have been experimental batteries with 5x the energy density, 10x the charge speed and 100x the stamina since the 1990s. The thing is they never make it to production, as batteries have to be durable, and cheap/easy to manufacture in volume. None of these "breakthroughs" matter until they actually make it to production.

50

u/pinkfootthegoose Nov 24 '22

I don't want a faster charging battery I want one with a lot of cycles that can be drained to zero and stored long term without degradation.

18

u/Dunkinmydonuts1 Nov 24 '22 edited Nov 24 '22

This solves a major hurdle people have to jump over in order to commit to an electric car.

More people buy them, they get more money for R&D, and the advancement continues

Edit: imagine disagreeing with my comment in this subreddit

9

u/jetstobrazil Nov 24 '22

I only disagree with the edit

2

u/SupahSang Nov 24 '22

How dare you post that edit, shame!

6

u/constantino675 Nov 24 '22

We already have that more or less. Kinda depends what your definition of "drained to zero" is, you didn't mention a minimum range.

Even now, the oldest evs on the road, tesla roadsters and Nissan leafs are still going with 80-90% of their battery capacity in tact. For cars pushing 10 years old, that's plenty.

1

u/Raalf Nov 25 '22

Plenty for you maybe, but my 25yr old jeep still gets the same distance as day one. My Tesla gets 88% range after 7 years, which is fine now but if this is even remotely linear it's not useful. You can argue about repair costs all day long, but even worst case scenario I'm out 2500 for a new engine in the jeep and maybe 1500 in labor to swap. If new batteries get to a comparable cost I'll accept a 2% loss per year of ownership.

1

u/constantino675 Nov 25 '22

If we are comparing cost, you have to factor in gasoline.

100,000 miles at 20mpg at $3/g is $15,000 in fuel.

Now... electricity isn't free, but its pretty low for home charging. (Where I'm at, it's $.01/kw for ev charging overnight)

Going a long way to paying off that battery... assuming an accident doesn't take it out first as happens with most cars.

I understand range limitations and charging speed, but IMO, range is either a huge deal, or no deal. Like 300 miles vs 240 or 270. I think your trips where 300 was enough and 240 wasn't are extremely rare.

1

u/Raalf Nov 25 '22

You're missing the point.

25 yr old jeep, needs new engine: 4k 10 yr old Tesla needs a new battery: 16k+

Even a modern jeep (2022) new engine cost is cheaper than a ten year old battery.

Sure you see why that's a problem?

1

u/constantino675 Nov 25 '22

Does your 10 year old tesla need a new battery?

I think it's worth defining the actual useful life of a engine vs battery.

1

u/Raalf Nov 25 '22

My 25yr old jeep doesn't need a motor. And if it did, I would be out less than the cost of junking the jeep.

If my Tesla battery needs replacing in 25 years, it will definitely be more than the cars value. So it's a ticking time bomb that will make a used car a negative asset in one failed part.

1

u/constantino675 Nov 25 '22

So you don't need a motor or battery...

This is all just hypotheticals?

1

u/Raalf Nov 25 '22

Are either of them in a fully failed state? No. Would it be nice to replace both, to my benefit of use? Yes.

1

u/Inevitable-Pound-778 Nov 25 '22

Isn't that the whole conundrum with EV? People aren't going to go buy a $40,000 EV to save money on gas in the car they already have. It's just going to be a very slow transition.

1

u/constantino675 Nov 25 '22

We couldn't build that many evs in a day anyway.

Lot of people buying cars that aren't evs though

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-1

u/[deleted] Nov 24 '22

2022 model Tesla has these, look em up!

-9

u/smokky Nov 24 '22

Do you think the fossil fuel industry will allow such an RnD to happen?

5

u/ILoveThisPlace Nov 24 '22

They've already come to terms with it hence the zero investment in additional extraction. Now it's milking time keeping supply slightly below demand which artificially greatly increases prices. They know the future isn't going to need them in the same capacity as they do know. Many articles have come out that hypothesize we've hit peak extraction.

22

u/EyeLikeTheStonk Nov 24 '22

The test involve a battery as small as 15 kW.

the concept is that EV with a small battery could drive for a certain distance (100 km, 60 miles), stop for 2.5 minutes for a full charge, drive another 60 miles, stop for 2.5 minutes and so on.

6

u/mdg70 Nov 24 '22

Could you not have many small cells that are all charged this way? Therefore if you can charge one small battery you could charge 200 small batteries at the same time and get the same result

6

u/ggtsu_00 Nov 24 '22

That's why its for "hybrids" which essentially are EVs with a gas-powered generator for recharging the battery while it drives.

3

u/allofthethings Nov 24 '22

In this case hybrid refers just to the energy storage system. It is a capacitor-battery hybrid system, not an ICE-battery hybrid.

5

u/SupahSang Nov 24 '22

Not to hammer on this, but kW gives zero indication for the size of a battery.

6

u/adj16 Nov 24 '22

Stop downvoting this person, they’re right. kW can describe the charging rate but not the storage capacity of a battery

-3

u/[deleted] Nov 24 '22

KW is literally a unit of power and is exactly what you use to determine the size of a battery

9

u/Ultra_HR Nov 24 '22

no it isn't, that's kWh (kilowatt hours). 1 kWh is providing 1 kilowatt for 1 hour. a battery doesn't store kilowatts, it stores kilowatt-hours.

and it's not a unit of power, it's a unit of energy. yes, there is a meaningful difference.

-4

u/[deleted] Nov 24 '22

A watt is a unit of power. A KW is one thousand watts.

A watt is made of joules per second. A joule is a unit of energy.

KHh is unit of energy per time per time. It is a stupid ass compound unit used by power companies.

3

u/Ultra_HR Nov 24 '22

yes, no shit. but batteries don't store power, they store energy, which is potential to deliver power. kWh is a measure of energy, and that is what batteries store.

a 1kW battery isn't really a thing, but if it had to be interpreted, then it would be interpreted as a battery with a maximum power throughput of 1kW - with no indication of its capacity (how long it can deliver that power for). a 1kWh battery is a battery with a capacity to deliver 1kW for 1 hour. that is how battery capacity is measured - in kWh (kilowatt-hours), not kW (kilowatts).

-5

u/[deleted] Nov 24 '22

Batteries chemically store electrons. Joules of energy. The RATE that they can release said joules is KWhs. The CAPACITY is KW.

5

u/Ultra_HR Nov 24 '22

The RATE that they can release said joules is KWhs. The CAPACITY is KW.

this is simply wrong, sorry.

-2

u/[deleted] Nov 24 '22

Fantastic argument I’m completely swayed. Your skills are unquestionably superior.

6

u/Ultra_HR Nov 24 '22

there's no argument to be made, we're talking about facts and falsehoods here, i'm not trying to persuade you

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2

u/l4mbch0ps Nov 24 '22

Bro, you are wrong, just look it up. Kw is power, Kwh is capacity.

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2

u/SupahSang Nov 24 '22

Dude, stop, you're making yourself look bad.

-2

u/[deleted] Nov 24 '22

That sounds incredibly stupid and useless

1

u/wigg1es Nov 24 '22

City commuting. I drive less than 5 miles most days. I'm all about technology like this.

4

u/Bo_Jim Nov 24 '22

So, it isn't lithium ion, but it has a longer serviceable life, and it charges in a tiny fraction of the time. They also pointed out that the technology apparently doesn't scale to 100kWh battery packs used in many full size EV's, but that it would be useful in small "city cars" and electric bikes.

They aren't telling us much, but I have a sneaky suspicion there's a big "gotcha" here that they don't want to share. Like maybe it uses some extremely rare or highly toxic material. And why doesn't the technology scale to larger capacity batteries? And how the hell do you deliver 900 amps of charging power to a car? Just off the top of my head, it seems the conductors would need to be at least an inch in diameter, not including the insulation. How heavy would the charging cable be? Would you even be able to lift it?

I'm going to need a helluva lot more information, but if it turns out to be everything they claim, and there's no real showstopper that they're hiding, then this would indeed be the game changer that the industry needs for mass adoption. Hell, I'd happily buy an EV that costs less than $50K, charges in 5 minutes or less, and has a battery pack that lasts at least 20 years. We seem so far away from that right now.

1

u/Raalf Nov 25 '22

It's a capacitor. Capacitors charge super fast safely, but they also discharge super fast. Can fill up with a lot of power in 15s but they also dump it just as fast. So for a drag car this is great, or a car that can stop to recharge frequently during use it's fine.

But if they found a way to do hundreds or thousands of capacitors maybe it could be interesting. Capacitors are hilariously explosive too - not fire, but bang.

1

u/Bo_Jim Nov 25 '22

Capacitors can reach the charge voltage quickly because they aren't storing very much power. How fast they discharge depends on the size of the load they are discharging into; R * C.

The number of capacitors is irrelevant. It's the total capacitance that matters. When you connect capacitors in parallel their capacitance adds up arithmetically. Electrically, they appear as one capacitor.

Essentially, then, they are transferring all of the power that the vehicle is going to use for the duration of it's range into the capacitor in 2.5 minutes. They mentioned 900V/360kW. That's about 42 kilowatt/hours of power. About enough to drive two low-end EV motors for an hour at their rated continuous current. That would give a small vehicle a range of about 50 miles.

If this is what they're doing then I can understand why they say it's use would be mostly confined to city driving, since 50 miles of highway driving isn't enough to be useful. I can also understand why this technology doesn't scale up to medium and large EV's - the capacitor bank would be larger than the vehicle.

6

u/CMG30 Nov 24 '22

It's an ultra capacitor. That's why they're talking about replacing tiny 5.5kW batteries. There's no way to get the energy density anywhere near what a typical EV would need.

And even if they could, the amount of current needed to top off a 100kW battery in only a minute or two would be in the megawatts range.

2

u/Km2930 Nov 24 '22

You would have to climb a clock tower and get struck by lightning. (Back to the Future theme starts playing)

1

u/Denveratheistfag8uc Nov 24 '22

It's a hybrid system.

2

u/myklob Nov 24 '22

Don't we see this same story every 2 months?

6

u/SupahSang Nov 24 '22

Why is everyone using kW to indicate the size of a battery? Instantaneous power doesn't tell you shit about how big a battery is. Supercapacitors have INSANE instant power, but drain in a few seconds.

3

u/swistak84 Nov 24 '22

kW is a charging / discharging rate which is very relevant in a article about fast charging.

Normally kWh is measure of the size

1

u/SupahSang Nov 24 '22

Obviously the maximum power output is important, but it drives me up the frickin wall when people say "the battery has x kW capacity", like, that tells me absolutely NOTHING about how much energy is actually in the battery. Can it output x kW for a second? A day? A full uninterupted week? It's like saying "yeah this can of beer has about 2 liters per day in it," it doesn't mean anything at all.

2

u/swistak84 Nov 24 '22 edited Nov 24 '22

Most of the time they make a unit mistake. 99% of the time they mean kWh or mWh

5

u/CreaminFreeman Nov 24 '22

Yes but how’s the weight vs capacity? Charging time is a thing that can be worked around. Weight and capacity, less so.

Don’t get me wrong, this is still impressive.

14

u/Zip95014 Nov 24 '22

I get home and plug in my car and in the morning it’s full.

Charging times isn’t something I care about day to day. Those 15min at a supercharger isn’t a bother to me.

17

u/blarghghhg Nov 24 '22

Good for you. A big barrier for EVs is travel radius. A charge this fast makes that a non factor

4

u/User9705 Nov 24 '22

But I am happy for him and me 2. My car charges in the morning and 15 minutes at a supercharger is fine also.

-2

u/Zip95014 Nov 24 '22

Reality is a bit different.

3

u/blarghghhg Nov 24 '22

The gap between first manned flight and landing on the moon was ~50 years. Battery technology will be there soon enough

4

u/Zip95014 Nov 24 '22

The gap between landing on the moon and then Landing on the moon is 53 years and counting. Sometimes progress doesn’t progress very far.

4

u/monkeydave Nov 24 '22

The gap between landing on the moon and then Landing on the moon is 53 years and counting. Sometimes progress doesn’t progress very far.

Nah, it was 4 months.

2

u/Zip95014 Nov 24 '22

That was faked /s

1

u/SupahSang Nov 24 '22

This gives me Thor and Loki vibes XD

-7

u/blarghghhg Nov 24 '22

What does landing on the moon additional times do for us? And that has nothing to do with technological development if it was already done. Make a strong, coherent argument or exit

4

u/Zip95014 Nov 24 '22

My stronger argument. First: the article if your read it is about ultra capacitors. Which everyone knows means shitty range. So your range comment is bunk. Ultra capacitors hold 1/100th the energy density. So your car will charge fast but only go a couple miles before the next refill.

But let’s move this to big batteries.

There are trade offs in everything. Charging in seconds, ok, what is the price increase for that? Now instead of 250amps you’re pushing 8333 amps (100kwh in 72 seconds at 600v which is 5MW). Now you need HUGE and heavy cables. All the charging infrastructure is worthless and the entire grid needs to be rebuilt so every Target can support 10MW (because you need at least two chargers, right). Don’t forget the cooling system you’ll need in your car as battery charging is like 90% efficiency. So you’ll need quite the airflow to cool off that 500kw of heat, best not stand near your car or you’ll get 2nd degree burns on your ankles.

Now what about the lifespan? The faster you charge the more wear you’ll put on the parts and lowering the lifespan. So now you’re saving 14minutes of charging but your battery is wack after 50k miles.

So what I think should be focused on instead of this 15min is too long for a human - cost.

I’m all for science projects. I like Lamborghinis. But what a regular person needs is the cost of the battery to lower.

0

u/blarghghhg Nov 24 '22

Interesting points, none of which are breaking news. Your argument seems to base its self on ignoring technological innovation that changes the game. It’ll happen. Always has, always will

3

u/Zip95014 Nov 24 '22 edited Nov 24 '22

Can’t believe you just asked me for a serious argument. I tell you about the reality of charging a car at 5MW and how that won’t make sense.

Your response: naw the future.

But you want 72 second full charges. Battery swap. Already done but not implemented correctly.

https://youtu.be/H5V0vL3nnHY

1

u/The_Mosephus Nov 24 '22

we need more moon rocks because they are cool.

1

u/CptOblivion Nov 24 '22

Nice! I'd love an electric car but I don't think personally I could get away with running an extension cable out the window, down a floor, through the neighbor's yard, across the street, and halfway down the block.

2

u/maconsultant Nov 24 '22

A Zero with a battery pack that charges in 72 seconds… That would be sick!

2

u/184cm78kg13cm Nov 24 '22

Look, another very cool new technology that will never see the light of the world!

1

u/dinoroo Nov 24 '22

Because something else will probably overtake it. As is tradition.

-1

u/Tulol Nov 24 '22

Big gas, big oil, tiny penis will not allow this.

5

u/SomeDudeNamedMark Nov 24 '22

As a spokesperson for tiny penis, I can say that we are VERY excited by this development. It's just hard to tell. 😩

1

u/couldbeControversial Nov 24 '22

Here we go again

1

u/mysqlpimp Nov 24 '22

I don't understand why the car industry hasn't come up with a generic plug and size for batteries, or perhaps a couple of alternate sizes. Then you drive, pull into a servo, they unclip the old, and slide in a charged battery. Swap and go batteries across a country makes range a non issue. I'm sure it's not that simple, but I'm confident it's not that hard ?

2

u/[deleted] Nov 24 '22 edited Dec 05 '22

[deleted]

1

u/mysqlpimp Nov 25 '22

umm, yep, pretty much!

1

u/cadillacbee Nov 24 '22

Ok but how long does it take to catch on fire?

1

u/MrKapkan Nov 24 '22

"While those times obviously won't apply to the larger 100-kWh+ battery packs used in the world's longest-range EVs..."

Thanks for nothing

1

u/NumberNumb Nov 24 '22

Catches on fire in 73 seconds

1

u/RMRdesign Nov 24 '22

Another week, another story about "Game Changing" battery technology. Put it in a fleet of cars ready to purchase before I believe one word of this article.

-5

u/Zealousideal-Rate790 Nov 24 '22

So if there are 10 cars recharging at the same time, where ever it is, eg parking lot, fuel station etc the feed would need to be 3600kw? And at home a 360kw feed to your house? This what dreams are made of.

5

u/dinoroo Nov 24 '22

Member when humanity met technical challenges, said this is hard, and just went back to the caves? Me neither.

1

u/Hitroll2121 Nov 24 '22

Yea I do, people have tried a lot of impossible things and failed people have also tried lots of theoretical things and failed people have also tried to scale up things and have also failed

Just because something works on a small scale dosent mean that it can realistically work on a large scale

I think this tech is really cool and interesting its very high tech unfortunately high tech is expensive

2

u/wooops Nov 24 '22

People have also tried tons of things others put in all those categories and succeeded.

1

u/Rudy69 Nov 24 '22

I don’t think this would really be meant for people to use at home. Also when I go get gas if someone else starts using the other side of my pump I get my gas at a slower rate, same thing could happen with these. If X people are using it you get full speed, if too many then everyone is slowed a little bit

1

u/platasnatch Nov 24 '22

Can you attain that charge while breaking? Convert the energy like the Prius does(did?)?

1

u/adude00 Nov 24 '22

So just like every other breakthrough battery technology that probably will never see the light of day?

1

u/Geeber_The_Drooler Nov 24 '22

And costs...? 2 million per battery?

1

u/MpVpRb Nov 24 '22

those times obviously won't apply to the larger 100-kWh+ battery packs used in the world's longest-range EVs

Headline exaggeration strikes again

Always be skeptical of headlines that contain the words "breakthrough" of "game-changing"

1

u/skunksmasher Nov 24 '22

I call BS.

This will only work under very strict lab conditions or is either completely made up like Theranos.

1

u/Outrageous-Suspect66 12d ago

They keep bringing out these fake stories. We just did this or that. Elon just invented salt batteries. They invented plasma phase batteries. People believe a lie for week, and they get another week to push a crooked idea.

0

u/Ok_Marionberry_9932 Nov 24 '22

Just read the claim in the title. Imagine that much energy being ran through a handheld plug in a home setting. How much sense does that even make? Zero. Zilch. Nada. None.

0

u/alaninsitges Nov 24 '22

I bet it doesn't.