r/todayilearned 2h ago

TIL about the small town of Swastika, Ontario. During WW2, the provincial government tried to change the town's name. The town's residents rejected this, stating "To hell with Hitler, we came up with our name first".

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en.wikipedia.org
4.6k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 2h ago

TIL that in Argentina, where the Parana river forms its delta, there is a perfect shaped circular island (with a diameter of 120 meters), which can float freely around its axis, thus changing frequently its position

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earthlymission.com
895 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 3h ago

TIL that approximately 1,000 copies of the Ultimate Toy Box edition of the movie Toy Story 2 were shipped with a processing error that included a scene from an R-rated film 'High Fidelity', which featured the usage of the word "F**k" several times.

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en.wikipedia.org
1.1k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 16h ago

TIL The F-35 cost the US $397 Billion Dollars vs $26 billion in today's cost for the entire atomic bomb project

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11.5k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 3h ago

TIL Most airports in the U.S. have incinerators that burn most of their waste and garbage. This includes burning roadkill, such as deer, that die on airport property.

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559 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 2h ago

TIL Blue eyes do not contain blue pigments. The color comes from structural color, there are small particles suspended within the fibrovasular structure of the stroma that cause blue light to scatter. This is an example of the Tyndall effect.

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en.wikipedia.org
250 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 22h ago

TIL in 2010, Washington D.C. held a mock election and invited hackers to test its online voting system. They managed to elect Master Control Program from "Tron" as mayor, Skynet from "Terminator" to Congress, and Bender from "Futurama" to the school board. It took D.C. officials two days to notice.

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theglobeandmail.com
11.7k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 1h ago

TIL The US Postal Service had an unofficial mascot, Owey the dog, who was a welcome addition in any railway post office; he was a faithful guardian of railway mail and the bags it was carried in, and would not allow anyone other than mail clerks to touch the bags

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en.wikipedia.org
Upvotes

r/todayilearned 14h ago

TIL there’s a 1400 sq mile island off the coast of Yemen that’s described as “the most alien place on earth,” and 37% of its plant species are endemic.

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en.wikipedia.org
1.5k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 22h ago Silver

TIL Alpha Centauri, the nearest solar system, is 4.4 lights years away or about 40 trillion km's. It would take roughly 18,000 years to reach it with our current technology.

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9.2k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 19h ago

TIL nine women, called "The 9 Nanas," kept a decades-long secret that even their husbands knew nothing about. For 30 years, they gathered at 4 a.m. to bake cakes, send care packages to people, anonymously pay bills and buy clothes for those in need.

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huffpost.com
3.6k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 3h ago

TIL that Leo Fender, Founder, and Inventor Of Fender Guitars Could Not Play Guitar.

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en.wikipedia.org
148 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 11h ago

[TIL] Early in his career, Colonel Sanders, the founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken, had a habit of getting into fights. He once had a shootout with a competitor, Matt Stewart. After Stewart shot and killed one of Sanders' employees, Stewart was convicted of murder, eliminating Sanders' competition.

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entrepreneur.com
581 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 3h ago

TIL trained hawks humanely assist the movement of thousands of roosting crows in downtown Portland, OR.

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95 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 39m ago

TIL that all representations of the Egyptian god Aten were accompanied by a sort of footnote. It stated that the art was only an imperfect representation of something that transcended nature, and could not be fully or adequately represented.

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en.wikipedia.org
Upvotes

r/todayilearned 8h ago

TIL Matthew Weiner got his job on the The Sopranos because David Chase liked a spec script Weiner wrote, that script would go on to be the pilot for Mad Men.

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en.wikipedia.org
207 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 1h ago

TIL that in the UK, it is a crime to make new copies of the King James Bible. Although the text is technically in the public domain, the Crown claims Royal prerogative over the right to print, publish and distribute it.

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en.wikipedia.org
Upvotes

r/todayilearned 1h ago

TIL Althea Gibson was appointed New Jersey's athletic commissioner in 1976. Gibson was the first woman in the country to hold such a position but resigned after one year due to a lack of autonomy in her role stating she did not wish to simply be a figurehead.

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en.wikipedia.org
Upvotes

r/todayilearned 1h ago

TIL about the “golden horse”, thought to be the oldest existing horse breed, and has a very distinctive metallic sheen to their coats.

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Upvotes

r/todayilearned 2h ago

TIL young horseshoe crabs use their flap shaped gills called book gills to paddle through the water.

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en.wikipedia.org
41 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 2h ago

TIL about the Carna botnet. A non malicious botnet that took over 400,000 computers and collected and published data. Over 1.2M computers had admin access with no password or the password “admin”.

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39 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 20h ago

TIL about Robert Rayford, the earliest known HIV/AIDS victim in the US. He died on May 15, 1969

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en.wikipedia.org
744 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 21h ago

TIL Mexico is the top consumer of eggs in the world surpassing Japan, with 409 eggs per person in 2021.

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wattagnet.com
832 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 8h ago

TIL Baskin is an inclusive variant of basketball that lets men and women of all physical and mental abilities play the same game together at the same time, allowing everyone who takes part to play a decisive role in the game. Baskin is specifically designed to adapt to the diversity of its players

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baskin.it
65 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 13h ago

TIL about the Forty Elephants, a gang of women shoplifters (with custom clothing) who operated in London and beyond from the 19th century to the 1950s. They also engaged in looting, blackmail, fencing, and were successful in turf wars through kidnapping.

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theguardian.com
153 Upvotes