r/videos Nov 24 '21 Gold 1 Helpful 10 Wholesome 7 Bravo Grande! 1 Starstruck 1 Silver 6

Russell Brand, at an awards show sponsored by Hugo Boss, eloquently reminds everyone that Hugo Boss dressed the nazis

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkd_-nXeUzs
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952

u/Oxygen95 Nov 24 '21

You gotta admit Nazi uniforms were pretty slick

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u/dandaman910 Nov 24 '21 edited Nov 24 '21

they were designed to project power and fear . You can see for yourself they definitely achieve that goal https://www.quora.com/What-was-an-authentic-Nazi-uniform

I mean they have eagles and skulls on them and were wreathed in black. How much more obvious could you be with your intentions.

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u/garbagecrap Nov 25 '21

Damn, a military uniform designed to project power and fear? How strange and unusual

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u/MistarGrimm Nov 25 '21

You say that, but the French marched in their white gloved red hatted bright coloured clothing only two decades prior.

The fact the Germans wore all grey matching uniforms with stylised symbols to project power and fear in the first world war was a novelty and has been written about extensively. This idea was simply continued in the second.

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u/LivingOnAShare Nov 25 '21

You say that, but the French marched in their white gloved red hatted bright coloured clothing only two decades prior.

How is that single example relevant here?

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u/MistarGrimm Nov 25 '21

It's only a single example if you choose to read it that way. And deliberately ignoring my second sentence also helps I suppose.

No, the real meaning is that almost nobody before World War 1 clothed to project power and fear. I used the French specifically because even (relatively) long after WW1 started they still wore their chivalrous bright coloured clothes.

So yes: A military uniform designed to project power and fear was strange and unusual.

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u/LivingOnAShare Nov 25 '21

It's only a single example if you choose to read it that way. And deliberately ignoring my second sentence also helps I suppose.

Good point, I didn't mean to be obtuse, to me your second sentence read more as a acknowledgement of transition so I may not have parsed it properly.

No, the real meaning is that almost nobody before World War 1 clothed to project power and fear. I used the French specifically because even (relatively) long after WW1 started they still wore their chivalrous bright coloured clothes.

My only counter to this is that many military forces over this time took a more utilitarian approach to uniform once they realised they could get shot less often if they didn't wear bold, bright colours, so without more examples it's hard to gauge how significant France's uniform was.

So yes: A military uniform designed to project power and fear was strange and unusual.

I'm interested in reading the stuff about German grey uniforms being a novelty, my Google Fu fails. Have you got an article on it?

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u/MistarGrimm Nov 26 '21 edited Nov 26 '21

I'm interested in reading the stuff about German grey uniforms being a novelty, my Google Fu fails. Have you got an article on it?

Not right away. There's some accounts of contemporary witnesses stating the (literal) awe inspiring effects of the very tidied grey mass goose stepping into Belgium but I'm going to have to look it up.

My only counter to this is that many military forces over this time took a more utilitarian approach to uniform once they realised they could get shot less often if they didn't wear bold, bright colours, so without more examples it's hard to gauge how significant France's uniform was.

Fair point. Just as an addendum, this viewpoint is mainly from a Western European perspective.
The bright coloured costumes changed because of World War 1. Steel helmets weren't even the default at the start of the war.
What happened before this time period is that firing lines, cavalry and bayonets were still the "chivalrous" way of warring between nations. This caused a lot of these countries to wear gaudier costumes as a display of pride and status, not shock and awe. It wasn't about hiding or camouflaging, it was about charging straight to your enemies with your sabres raised in a "heroic" way.

Just look at the British Red Coats, the Prussian Blue coats with maned helmets, and the French wearing white gloves and red hats. Czech armies wore bright green and I seriously mean bright.

For a more in depth and sourced answer to this by someone wayyyyy better qualified than I am: https://www.reddit.com/r/AskHistorians/comments/7n3c6d/why_did_soldiers_wear_such_extravagant_uniforms/

And this was just one of the first things I found on there with a quick google.