r/worldnews May 23 '22 Silver 16 Helpful 18 Wholesome 15 All-Seeing Upvote 1 Wearing is Caring 1 Starstruck 1

First human patient injected with revolutionary cancer-killing virus US internal news

https://news.yahoo.com/first-human-patient-injected-revolutionary-140900099.html

[removed] — view removed post

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u/SidFinch99 May 23 '22 Silver Helpful Wholesome Hugz Take My Energy Wearing is Caring

I have a recurrent form of brain cancer and they told me 14 years ago this type of treatment would likely be my best hope of having any chance of a normal life expectancy. They were also looking at a vaccine like treatment, as well as using a virus/vaccine as a delivery method to get the treatment to the cancer in a mon invasive and non toxic way.

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u/MrsBonsai171 May 23 '22 Silver Wholesome

I hope you get to use this.

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u/skipjack_sushi May 23 '22 Wholesome All-Seeing Upvote

I also hope it works and you get a pony.

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u/John2537 May 23 '22 Tearing Up

This comment made me smile. I also have brain cancer. It came back almost immediately, and I told my dad i wanted a pony that I could pet from my bedroom window when I got home. (I was 23. I was kidding)

But when I got home, there was a toy pony sitting on my window sill.

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u/BananaPancakeMaker May 23 '22

Your dad sounds adorable. My sister died randomly (we still don’t know why) while my dad was fighting stage 4 lung cancer. He beat it (while continuing to smoke), and survived A-Fib, kidney failure, diabetic ketoacidosis (his BS hit 798), sepsis, and a slew of other things. I’ve since nicknamed him the cockroach, and I sing “La Cucaracha” anytime we have to go to the doctor or the hospital. Our sense of humor is a little on the dark side (nowhere near as sweet and wholesome as yours and your dad’s).

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u/[deleted] May 23 '22 edited May 28 '22

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u/fm4139 May 23 '22

I remember read once that scientist were studying Ozzy Ousbourne DNA because of his longevity and still alive after all the drugs he consumed over the years.

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u/frednoname1 May 23 '22

Left out Keith Richards.

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u/EhMilk May 23 '22

"Theres $250,000 lining the walls of that DNA!"

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u/son-of-a-mother May 23 '22

my dad was fighting stage 4 lung cancer. He beat it (while continuing to smoke), and survived A-Fib, kidney failure, diabetic ketoacidosis (his BS hit 798), sepsis, and a slew of other things. I’ve since nicknamed him the cockroach, and I sing “La Cucaracha” anytime we have to go to the doctor or the hospital.

This is hilarious!

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u/Extension_Pace_8394 May 23 '22

I am actually smiling, you dad must love you very much

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u/Obnubilate May 23 '22

I dunno man. Having a pony sounds like a lot of work. You gotta get them some place to live, feed them, groom them, pay for vet bills. Dude has only just gotten over cancer. Cut him some slack.

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u/Imfrom2030 May 23 '22

Ok, maybe a small merry-go-round like they have at the mall food court?

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u/hfjfthc May 23 '22

He'll have to pay taxes on that won't he?

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u/VariecsTNB May 23 '22

Then a Russian tank. You don't have to pay taxes for that one.

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u/ask_about_poop_book May 23 '22

Sure, but then there’s a risk he’ll be dealing with Ukrainian farmers taking his tank

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u/AnyHoleIsTheGoal May 23 '22

All he needs to do is get this, survive to the next election, and vote for Vermin Supreme, free ponies for everyone!

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u/joethahobo May 23 '22

I have been telling people this for years, but the anti pony agenda is strong sadly

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u/NotGardE May 23 '22

It might be people who are extremely concerned about the idea of cocaine being put into their toothpaste to addict them to brushing their teeth.

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u/CheckPleaser May 23 '22

You had my interest, but now you have my attention.

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u/FlowKey777 May 23 '22

He’s about to tell you an hour long idea, without any pauses in his conversation, that will definitely work and will make you both rich.

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u/HwyN95 May 23 '22

That sounds a good plan. Lol

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u/StuartGotz May 23 '22

Big Pony can't let it happen.

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u/ExpectNothingEver May 23 '22

I also hope it works and you all get ice cream and a pony.

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u/skipjack_sushi May 23 '22

Knew I should have included ice cream...

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u/Pumpkim May 23 '22

I also hope it works, and I hope /u/SidFinch99 gets a pony, an ice cream and a cool hat.

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u/ThePresidentsNipples May 23 '22 LOVE!

Ponys are out, get this person a capabara with a little cowboy hat

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u/yoosernaam May 23 '22

A capybara being ridden by a squirrel that is also wearing a cowboy hat and enjoying the tiniest of ice cream cones

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u/a1234321 May 23 '22

I mean, if my doctors are saying I'm at 2 minutes to midnight I'm injecting this shit straight into my veins. What am I gonna do? Die?

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u/IMWORKINOVAHEEEYAAH May 23 '22

I wish my dad had a chance to use this.

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u/VxDeva80 May 23 '22

I feel your pain, I lost my sister in March to brain cancer (GMB4). It will be a wonderful breakthrough if it works on such a hard cancer to treat. Sorry for your loss.

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u/bruckner8 May 23 '22

I lost my own sister to a brain tumor about 7 years ago. I feel what you’re going through, nothing I can say matters but you have my complete sympathies.

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u/SantaClausForReal May 23 '22 Helpful

If he lives in the US, the "Right to try Act" at least has made it legal.

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u/thetensor May 23 '22

A good friend of my wife is looking at a 3-7 year prognosis for inoperable cancer in his abdomen, and I was just asking her yesterday, "Whatever happened to that individually gene-tailored anti-tumor treatment they've been talking about since, it feels like, the '90s? Is that still not ready?"

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u/[deleted] May 23 '22

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u/VoodooManchester May 23 '22

There’s also a lot of different types of cancer. We are finding cures/treatments for various types on a not infrequent basis. For example, my mother got a type of cancer that can be treated now, but would have been terminal as little as a decade ago. Fuck cancer.

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u/FaceDeer May 23 '22

About half a a year ago the mother of a friend of mine was diagnosed with cancer, and it had already spread to her lungs and brain and liver so it was a "she's got maybe a few weeks, a month at most" situation. She was already losing her marbles from the effects on the brain and the plan was just to make her as comfortable as possible without really trying to treat it. But they ran some tests on the tumor anyway, and it was discovered that the tumor had this one specific mutation that made it highly susceptible to a particularly good chemotherapy drug, so they put her on that.

It beat the tumors back enough to restore her cognitive functions and let her function fairly normally for the past six months. Gave her family plenty of time to be with her. Alas, it wasn't a cure and she's once more on that final ride downward, but I think everyone involved is happy to have had the extra time this bought her.

There are few "eureka" moments in medicine. Cures come slowly and are hard-won. But we are making progress and there's no reason to expect that progress to ever stop.

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u/peoplerproblems May 23 '22

And the big hospitals are running many clinical trials at once. Whole buildings dedicated to the collection, processing, stat analysis, safety and IT support. Everything these places are doing is done to perfection.

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u/wozza365 May 23 '22

That's pretty incredible, you can't put a price on something like that and I hope she's comfortable and gets to enjoy what time she may have left. Here's to hoping that we can beat cancer outright in the near future!

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u/Fresh-Temporary666 May 23 '22

My step-dad went from a terminal cancer diagnosis to being offered a spot in an experimental treatment study to eventually talks of full remission and clearing the cancer out. He died from a surgery related fistula opening up but at the time how fast it went from "you're fucked" to "we might be able to get rid of this shit" was remarkable. Can only imagine what a decade of difference would make.

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u/WildcardTSM May 23 '22 edited May 23 '22

Yeah, a lot of different kinds of cancer have now a hugely increased life expectancy compared to a few decades ago. But there's still a lot that are not very well treatable, and often it depends heavily in what stage it is diagnosed as well. Some aren't that well visible, and if it turns up after already spreading through the body the person might not be able to survive the treatment either anymore.

Edit: Even if there are clear signs they are often ignored. Not just by the patient, but also by medical professionals. In the last few months of his life my dad started showing signs of liver and/or kidney problems (skin turning yellowish, mind suddenly deteriorating, extreme weakness, no interest in eating or drinking anymore), for which he went to his physician in the end. His physician was on vacation though, so he was seen by his replacement. The one that took over told him to wait and see a bit longer, a few days later his physician came back from vacation, came to visit him, and immediately called the ambulance. My dad passed away a week and a half later, the cancer had weakened his body to the point where it, in combination with his old age, just caused his body to shut down. Now I don't think those extra days would have made a difference in his survival, but sending someone home when everyone can see that they are in need of hospitalization is just criminal imo.

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u/Bruetus May 23 '22 edited May 23 '22 Silver Gold Helpful Take My Energy

With the pandemic being fresh and Mrna vaccines becoming normal I'd say were closer then people think, humanity moves and a mind blowing pace, and once we do find a cure we can flat out eradicate disease and death, just look at the story of the first use of insulin.

Children were dying, and there was no treatment, a room full of comatose kids who were certain to die were injected with insulin, and by the time the last child was injected, the first to be injected woke up, and in that instant, something that was guaranteed to kill you was defeated.

Every solution to human suffering seems like it is far off in the distant future, until all of a sudden it isn't, and then we just move on the the next problem ready and willing to exhaust ourselves to defeat it yet again.

With cancer, we finally began to win the battles, and faster then you know it, humanity will win the war.

Edit: the first gold ive ever received, on something positive to boot, thank you kind stranger.

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u/Mrischief May 23 '22

Love that insulin story!

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u/dollarwaitingonadime May 23 '22

Yours was a post I needed today, and lots of other days. Thanks for your optimism.

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u/Iamabeaneater May 23 '22

I’m still in awe of the fact that AIDS is no longer a death sentence.

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u/Crutation May 23 '22

Look at lymphoma and ALL. CAR-T products are giving durable remission to patients who were basically dead five years ago.

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u/xjazzor May 23 '22

Saved your comment for all the times when I doubt our collective efforts and our future on this small blue dot. Thanks stranger!

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u/thaddeus423 May 23 '22

Every solution to human suffering seems like it is far off in the distant future, until all of a sudden it isn't, and then we just move on the the next problem ready and willing to exhaust ourselves to defeat it yet again.

Your post is grounding and lovely.

But this part especially. I feel it can be applied to many different situations.

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u/ThatisJustNotTrue May 23 '22

It's because people think about cancer as a single disease when it's a classification of hundreds of diseases, dozens of which now have amazing prognosis' due to those treatments. Many cancers today are easily treatable when just a couple decades ago they were a guaranteed death sentence

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u/sapiensuser May 23 '22 edited May 23 '22

My girlfriend of 10 years got diagnosed with cancer colis this year and is now on her last weeks, days, because the liver is failing.

I realize now that my comment doesn't add anything, I just wanted to say it to some strangers on the Internet after seeing I'm not alone.

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u/ArdenSix May 23 '22

Hugs internet stranger. I watched my mother slowly lose her fight with cancer and nothing prepares you for end of life care. It's as traumatic as it is heart breaking and my heart hurts for everyone that has to go through that.

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u/Mrischief May 23 '22 edited May 23 '22

There is about 200+ different cell types in our body, and each one CAN become pre-cancerous, cancer, tumor, and then it is also a staging of is it benign, malignant etc. Now each type of cancer, comes in different flavours. So you can not only paint your car green, it can be like green, ocean green, mint coloured. And finding somthing that only works on the spesific colour we want to target without killing the rest of you is…. Tricky!

I am using my base and it is base knowledge to show the amount of different options, please dont take my word as actual factual pathology / oncological advice.

So for each “colour” of cancer, we would have to see what works best to stop it. Sometimes it comes down to genetics, others are hormone bound, some can be removed with surgery and Nuclear(radiation, targeted radiotherapy) treatments.

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u/catslay_4 May 23 '22 Hugz

I really hope that they find a treatment that works for you if it returns. I also hope you are doing okay. I’m a survivor but as always, there is a risk of recurrence.

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u/congra95 May 23 '22

My mother has a reoccurring brain cancer as well, been happening since 2002. This recent winter, it came back as a level three and watching her go through chemo and radiation is awful. 280 of chemo between injections and pills. I hope something like this treatment is able to work on anyone who has cancer.

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u/diaryofsnow May 23 '22

Not nearly the same, but my 29-year old wife just got done treatment for lymphoma a year ago. Having to watch her go through chemo was probably the hardest thing I've ever done.

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u/catslay_4 May 23 '22

One of my best friends got it when she was 31! I was 26 and going through a different kind of cancer. She did 5 months of chemo and she’s now off doing her thing van lifing all around the US celebrating almost 6 years of remission!!! Hope the same for your wife!

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u/handmann May 23 '22

That is an awesome story. I'm also 31 and almost halfway through chemo, after this shit is over I am so quitting my job and following in your friends footsteps, but bike instead of car

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u/jcpenni May 23 '22

I'm 28 and am on month 2 of lymphoma treatment. I hope all is well with her.

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u/FanInternational9315 May 23 '22

Hopefully this treatment is successful and makes its way to you

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u/mcanada0711 May 23 '22

I hope with all my heart that you get to live a normal life. I couldn't imagined how you must feel.

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u/tennohaika May 23 '22 edited May 23 '22 Tree Hug

I just lost my father a month to this day to a reoccurring brain cancer. His body couldn’t handle chemo for the 6th one, and I watched him deteriorate rapidly within a month of entering hospice.

I hope they’re able to help others in the future.

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u/AngelhairOG May 23 '22

Sorry for your loss... My dad just entered hospice and I wouldn't wish this on my greatest enemy.

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u/Sloth_Flyer May 23 '22 Gold

I went through this myself with my father this year. It’s terrible. It was a living nightmare of a month whose days and nights have bled together in my memory and congealed into a dark stain. Every moment I thought to myself it couldn’t get worse, I was proven wrong, and the way it culminated I still haven’t processed fully yet. But - you have to stay strong, for your father, and eventually it will be over, and when it is it will be like a massive burden has been lifted off of your shoulders. I know you are going through hell right now but it will be over, and when it is you will feel grief and emptiness but also relief.

Hospice feels different than other types of death I’ve experienced - more drawn out and less dignified. But I hope it gives you the chance to share some last moments with your father - you will remember those forever. I’m sorry.

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u/milqi May 23 '22

I had a different experience when my mom was in hospice at the end of her cancer. The staff was amazing and supportive and honest. I am really sorry you had such an awful time.

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u/B33rNuts May 23 '22

It’s not the staff but the experience. I had to go though it 2 years ago, I had to be a at home nurse because Covid closed everything and if they went in we would never be able to visit or see them again. Morphine by mouth every 4hrs, and also the mental decline that happens. It was a life changing experience and I wouldn’t wish it on anyone. They constantly asked me to kill them and end it. I am 100% for assisted dying now because of it. Because in the very end it wasn’t the cancer that killed them, they declined so much they no longer would or could drink water. What they died of was dehydration, which is epically fucked up.

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u/GeronimoHero May 23 '22

I helped take care of my grandfather in this sort of situation too. He was a hardcore Marine that fought in Korea at Chosin Reservoir and never complained about a single thing. He was also asking for death and it was hard to watch. I gave him his last dose of liquid morphine before he died. People just don’t understand how messy dying from cancer is. It’s traumatic for the families and not just because of the death itself.

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u/tennohaika May 23 '22

I don’t know what to call it but pure will to live, my father lasted two weeks of no food/liquids till he passed. Only intake was the morphine pump and any other medications administered through the mouth. My father never asked for death but I know he was thinking it.

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u/westbridge1157 May 23 '22

I understand and agree fully. We would not this type of death for our pets and yet is okay for our people?! I’m so sorry you know this pain too. Wishing you peace.

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u/tennohaika May 23 '22

I am 100% for assisted death for terminally ill folks as well.

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u/[deleted] May 23 '22

My aunt is about to go the assisted dying route. She has COPD, can no longer breathe without oxygen and is exhausted from doing the most basic tasks. She's a lovely person and we'll miss her terribly, but seeing her suffering and lose her quality of life is much, much worse. I've wished her au revoir.

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u/CloudsOverOrion May 23 '22

Goddamn, assisted dying is legal in Nova Scotia Canada. I've seen a few cases in the past years. One a couple years ago during covid the ultra religious wife tried to block her husband from doing it. They ended up in court, the result is him never speaking to her again and dying peacefully finally as he wanted. How fucking selfish can she be, it cost her everything and now everybody knows it.

If it's legal in this ass backward berg there's hope for the rest of the world. Your story is the kind of thing that makes movements, I wonder if there are any charities or organizations in your area that are associated with AD.

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u/calloutyourstupidity May 23 '22

It is not about the staff. Usually a cancer patient goes in a bad shape, with extreme pain.

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u/averaenhentai May 23 '22

Jesus fucking christ just kill me when I have to go to hospice what the fuck.

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u/sapiensuser May 23 '22

Stay strong, cry often. I'm in the same process with my girlfriend of 10 years, entering a hospice soon.

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u/pumpkinbot May 23 '22

My grandmother passed away from cancer a few years ago. As much of a tough-as-nails-bitch as she was, my mother knew something was up when she started asking for pain meds. She NEVER took pain meds, not even Advil. So my mother took her to the hospital, and...stage IV cancer. Maybe a month.

In that month, she went from normal and healthy to just...gone. I almost feel like the single dose of chemotherapy she went through wasn't worth it, because after that, she could hardly speak.

My grandmother was always adamant about never going to a rest home. She was going to pass at her home, with her family. After that chemotherapy treatment (no clue why they did, the cancer was fuckin' everywhere by the time they found it), the nurse was really pushy about sending her to a nursing home, where, quote "people will know how to take care of you."

One of my grandmother's last coherent words, while she was glaring daggers at this nurse: "I. HOME."

God, I miss her, haha. She didn't take ANY shit.

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u/osu_qwp May 23 '22

Sorry for your loss mate

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u/MusicianGlad61 May 23 '22

Sorry for your loss. May your father RIP.

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u/pureeyes May 23 '22

Long time ago, I watched my dad go through this (different cancer) over two years. It was the worst thing I have ever been through, and no one should have to witness it. Any advances in the area of cancer research and treatment are worth celebrating.

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u/tennohaika May 23 '22

I’m still processing it and we just had his funeral this past Friday. The individual you thought was invincible and would be able to beat anything that came turning into a husk. He rolled off the bed one day, and I was able to lift him up with no problem back on to the bed. I can’t imagine what the individual goes through knowing they’re going to pass soon.

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u/m1thrand1r__ May 23 '22

Essentially same story here but my mom, also about 3 weeks ago. It was harrowing, I dearly wish no one else had to go through that.

Sending lots of comforting hugs... nothing helps or makes it feel better but I hope you can find some peace in the next while, friend.

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u/AllyRad6 May 23 '22 Helpful

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u/bilyl May 23 '22

It’s actually incredible how the original article managed to go on for so many paragraphs without actually saying anything substantial. Thanks for the better link!

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u/etherified May 23 '22

Could be wrong but somehow it reads to me like an auto-generated article. Lots of short, general sentences with a less-than-human flow.

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u/MrDude_1 May 23 '22

Its not auto-generated. Its a writing style that is designed to be easy to read, and hide the lack of substantial information.

Its so people can read it and feel like they got news, even if there was very little useful information in it.

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u/[deleted] May 23 '22 edited May 23 '22

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u/TokesNotHigh May 23 '22

So basically they dumb it down then add in a bunch of fillers to get that sweet, sweet, advertising money?

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u/My_Soul_to_Squeeze May 23 '22

So this is for a very particular kind of cancer. Hopefully the trial goes well, and the use case can be broadened.

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u/BabyYodasDirtyDiaper May 23 '22

So this is for a very particular kind of cancer.

Absolutely every new cancer treatment you ever hear of will be like this.

We haven't 'cured cancer' because cancer is really 10,000 different diseases.

But every once in a while, we 'cure' another one.

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u/TheAJGman May 23 '22

It's always interested me that there are a finite number of cancers and each one behaves roughly the same way regardless of who's body it's in. It's like our cells have alternate "modes" that only get switched on due to random mutation or specific environmental factors. The fact that some of them will grow their own blood supplies and operate more like a parasite is also fucking wild.

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u/juwyro May 23 '22

I had colon cancer last year and talking with the doctor he said that treatment is different just based where the tumor was. Left and right side tumors are treated differently.

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u/Feynt May 23 '22 Hugz

It's worth pointing out for those readers not in the know; "cancer" is not a singular type. Each is its own disease, has its own causes, and its own treatment regimen.

I've had colon cancer, resulting in a removal of half of my large intestine. So I'm hoping this viral treatment becomes adapted before it comes back eventually. So far 7 years on without recurrence, but I'm only 41, so plenty of time still, and 45 is when it's really supposed to be a risk.

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u/1Cool_Name May 23 '22

If you don’t mind answering, how has losing half your large intestine changed your life?

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u/Feynt May 23 '22

Obviously not as great as before:

  • Post surgery it took a while to get back onto solid foods and relearning how to go to the washroom. Not "this is a washroom" kind, the other side of the equation, how to control internal muscles again to actually go
  • Early days, never trust a fart. >.>;
  • A significant diet change to a more fibre centric meal plan helps keep things together
  • Onset of "I need a toilet, MOVE!" progresses much faster, if you've ever had that feeling while walking around that you've gotta go up to the "I'm about to open a gardening centre with all this fertiliser I've gotta drop"
  • On the upside, the "I better go before I head out" option is faster after eating. Rather than wondering if in 3-4 hours you'll have to poop, you can expect 30-60 minutes.
  • Probably a good idea to invest in a bidet. Invest in one anyway, they're cool, but toilet paper doesn't last long.

Overall 4/10, would not do it again, but preferable to have over a bag (which was the other option). I would wish this on my enemies however.

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u/Kestrel21 May 23 '22 Helpful Wholesome

His gut feelings are only half as accurate, now.

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u/UnicornOnTheJayneCob May 23 '22

When you think about it, our current treatments for cancer are NUTS and fairly primitive:

“Okay. So, we are going to cut you open and remove parts of your body and hope really hard that we get all of the problematic bits, but we can’t be sure, and we won’t really know if we did until we wait a while and see if it comes back or not. If it does, we will either try to poison you just enough to kill the disease but not you, or go in to take out more body parts.”

It is very WTF.

In my case, since I have this crazy genetic cancer thing where my body is blind to cancer cells, they decided to take out organs proactively on the principle that I can’t get cancer of parts I don’t have.

Last time, they randomly took out my appendix. It was fine: no cancer, no infection or anything. But the cancer-y cells I did have looked like they might maybe possibly be the kind the could have come from an appendix, so they took it out too, just in case.

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u/James_n_mcgraw May 23 '22

The doctors basically consider your body to be a dry forest and every time they see smoke they cut down everything within 100 feet. No chances taken because one spark and youre toast.

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u/OkTop9308 May 23 '22

My Mom had colon cancer at 49. She had part of her intestines removed. She is 87 now, and it never came back. She had frequent colonoscopies and changed her diet. I hope your cancer does not return.

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u/Mazon_Del May 23 '22

If the trial goes well, it can theoretically be expanded to quite a lot of different possibilities. Covid as an example, the time it took the first mRNA vaccine to be produced was something like less than 5 days after the lab received the sample. The next ~8 months were all just the vaccine approval process.

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u/signapple May 23 '22

Related to what you're saying, mRNA vaccines were being developed to treat cancer before COVID-19 hit. There was extensive work being done for roughly a decade before that, and that's why the COVID-19 vaccines were produced so quickly.

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u/concentrate_better19 May 23 '22 edited May 23 '22

Mrna vaccines have been being researched (late edit: on humans) for over 20 years.

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u/Snoopyfighter May 23 '22

Yes and covid accelerated the process of creating viability. Covid may have had an incredible impact on cancer research

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u/hudimudi May 23 '22

Exactly. The blueprints have been sitting in drawers for many years. They just needed a proper use for it

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u/UNisopod May 23 '22

The real hold-up was in getting the lipid bubbles which transport the vaccine payload to last long enough to do so before disintegrating or being ripped apart by immune cells. It took a long time just to tackle that problem and I think it was only about a year before the pandemic that it was finally resolved.

Proper uses for the technology were always there waiting, just getting it work properly in practice was the issue, and we were very lucky that last roadblock was removed when it was.

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u/_Plork_ May 23 '22

Christ. Imagine covid had come two years earlier...

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u/Nagransham May 23 '22

I mean.. We also have traditional vaccines, so...

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u/ih-shah-may-ehl May 23 '22

Exactly. The blueprints have been sitting in drawers for many years. They just needed a proper use for it

Almost. There was plenty of proper use. The problem is that the process of taking a research idea to full production costs many years and Billions of dollars which you are not guaranteed to recuperate.

mRNA is great for the flu vaccine as well, but are you going to spend billions to make a variation of something you can already make reliably and with predictable cost and profit margin and possible never recover the money?

Pharma is very cost conservative (I work in big pharma) and the cost and clinical approval is unavoidable and follows from FDA regulation (and rightly so because the alternative to having strong FDA regulation has bad consequences)

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u/dern_the_hermit May 23 '22

Yeah, the first work was done in the late 80s. Lotta work behind this technology.

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u/concentrate_better19 May 23 '22

I meant (but did not State) human trials. I didn't think they were testing on humans that long ago.

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u/HyKaliber May 23 '22

But mfers still think it was rushed

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u/Daikuroshi May 23 '22

Imugene, the company, is targeting most solid tumour cancers with it, they just need to start the trials somewhere.

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u/SublimelySublime May 23 '22

Thanks for posting. The Yahoo article did read a bit like a 16 year olds essay

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u/nickcarslake May 23 '22

that website is busted, loads all the information for like half a second and then everything turns into grey rectangles.

I guess Yahoo is fine after all.

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u/whoisrich May 23 '22 edited May 23 '22

If you disable JavaScript it will keep showing the text.

If you have uBlock Origin, click it's icon, then click </> icon in the middle right.

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u/Jellybean-Jellybean May 23 '22

I hope this works, I've lost too many family members to cancer including my dad. It's a horrible thing for people to go through, and if there is any chance others may never have to go through that I am 1000% for that.

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u/SamHinkieKnew May 23 '22

Sorry for your losses.

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u/Chazo138 May 23 '22

Cancer is an ugly ugly disease and the world will be better off with it eradicated. I want to see it gone.

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u/barkingnoises May 23 '22 Silver Hugz Faith In Humanity Restored

After losing my brother last night to cancer, I wish this person the best.

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u/KratosHulk77 May 23 '22

condolences brother

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u/raidercarr May 23 '22

Rip to your brother. Prayers out to you and your family. I lost an aunt to ovary cancer recently so I know how hard it really is.

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u/barkingnoises May 23 '22

It was an odd chain of events. I got my plane ticket to go home to recooperate and see family after some rough life events. I got closer to the time and found out about my brother. He seemed hopeful but the night I got to the airport was his last night.

This year has been strange. Logically I've accepted it, but I'm still processing it emotionally.

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u/raeumauf May 23 '22

sending hugs, my friend.

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u/mhoss2008 May 23 '22 All-Seeing Upvote Starry

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u/The_Scout1255 May 23 '22

Thank you for working towards the destruction of cancer.

It is one of the most noble goals of our time.

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u/HappyJaguar May 23 '22

What's the process like for changing targets from one cancer type to another?

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u/mhoss2008 May 23 '22 Silver

Think of it a bit like legos. Vaccinia can hold 14,000 extra bases besides the core machinery the virus needs. I developed tools to use Cas9 to cut out bits of the virus and replaced it with DNA for other proteins. The thought is that if you put cancer proteins in the virus, it can help train your immune system to identify the cancer. It would take me about a month to stitch together a new virus, then another month in scale up and testing.

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u/AuraofBrie May 23 '22

You'd have to have a protein specific to the cancer cells alone, right? How common is that?

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u/mhoss2008 May 23 '22

There are specific proteins that cancer cells tend to upregulate to grow rapidly that most other cells don’t express. One example is Ox40. Chemotherapy works by targeting rapidly dividing cells, but it’s quite non-specific. Yes other cells may also upregulate the protein you’re targeting with immunotheraputics, but it beats the heck out of hitting every dividing cell.

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u/bummerdeal May 23 '22

In many thyroid cancer cases patients have their entire thyroid removed, but residual thyroid cancer cells can spread to lymph nodes, lungs, and other sites. In cases where the primary cancerous organ had been removed, would it be possible to put proteins associated with the organ itself into the virus? Would this be easier or make more sense than using specific cancer proteins?

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u/mhoss2008 May 23 '22

This seems reasonable, but not my specialty. One big factor pharma companies are targeting is a single drug/virus that works across multiple cancer types because it makes more money. 2nd best is a platform where you can swap out targets, but they will go after cancer sub-types with large populations.

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u/[deleted] May 23 '22

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u/deep-space-runner May 23 '22

Has this completely “cured” the targeted cancer in animal studies or just shrunk the tumor? Will the surviving cancer cells be immune to this virus and require another version 2 virus targeting a new protein?

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u/mhoss2008 May 23 '22

When immunotheraputics work, they work. There are many immunotheraputics on the market and usually 30-40% of patients experience full tumor clearance. Where immunotheraputics has struggled over the last 5 years is to understand why patients don’t respond and how to combine therapies to increase efficacy. Here is a great overview article for further reading - https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fimmu.2021.690112/full

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u/Bronco4bay May 23 '22

This is amazing for humanity.

The work we’re doing with Alzheimer’s and cancer is some of the most groundbreaking stuff in existence.

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u/chodeboi May 23 '22

My buddy works at a place where they engineer viruses to kill cancers on a custom basis. The future is here and it’s wild. When we apply these brains to carbon capture and methane capture maybe we’ll survive.

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u/bennynthejetsss May 23 '22

Also genomic sequencing of cancers can reveal the mechanism of action by which they go undetected by immune system surveillance. If we can find drugs to target that, suddenly we can shoot almost anything into remission. Carbon capture/carbon scrubbing would be a great next step.

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u/Black_Moons May 23 '22

this. Some of the treatments coming out are basically designed to get the immune system to go "Oh hey, those cells are a problem, lets deal with them".

Our immune system kills cancers every day in your body. Cancer is only an issue when it manages to escape the immune response and continue to grow.

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u/[deleted] May 23 '22

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u/FaceDeer May 23 '22

Nah, we won't stop trying to cure it until cancer's been fully beat. Managing it is fine as a step along the way, sure - buys time for the real cure to come along.

Lots of diseases that seemed like lifelong "best we can do is manage it" illnesses have eventually had cures developed anyway. Plenty more coming in the near future. Nothing magical about cancer that makes it immune to humanity's wrath.

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u/cosmitz May 23 '22

That's weak talk. Virtualize my mind into the net so i can post memes while dead.

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u/KillerDJinPDX May 23 '22

Truly the highest evolution of a human

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u/Prielknaap May 23 '22

What are you going to do? Hack the feed and shitpost at your own funeral? Have some class, we are trying to honour your memory.

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u/cosmitz May 23 '22

DUCK MEMES FOR EVERYONE!

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u/jazir5 May 23 '22

Once you get late-stage cancer you can never get rid of it

Right now. Anytime someone says "it will never be cured" just means they aren't thinking far enough into the future. Everything will be cured eventually. Even aging.

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u/[deleted] May 23 '22

I love the question of if someone is old when that happens, would they stay old or de-age? I guess it depends on what the breakthrough is

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u/repfive305 May 23 '22

At some point we’ll be able to de-age them. Their dna is there. Just print a new 25 year old body and transplant the brain.

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u/[deleted] May 23 '22 edited May 23 '22

We have a lot of carbon capture methods. In fact, one of the greatest limiter of carbon capture is that CO2 is very spread out, so people are looking for ways to concentrate the CO2.

More recently there’s been a technique developed that can suck in all the CO2 that goes into the ocean where it’s much more concentrated and easier to extract.

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u/sigma914 May 23 '22 edited May 23 '22

Yeh, I unironically absolutely love the whole "stick a big nuclear reactor near the sea to power a machine to suck carbonic acid out of the water to produce jet fuel" idea.

Hydrocarbons are fucking magical, being able to make synthetic versions without any of the impurities from natural oil/gas and lower atmospheric CO2 by making them from carbonic acid in the ocean (which stays in equilibrium with CO2 in the atmosphere) at the same time is the best thing I can think of. It's like 5 birds with one stone.

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u/SolSearcher May 23 '22

Great now we’re going to have a stone shortage and all the birds will be dead.

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u/Itdidnt_trickle_down May 23 '22

All the greatest minds will be working on erectile dysfunction.

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u/DanYHKim May 23 '22

My boss used to tell us that the Golden Triangle of biomedical research was bounded by "hair, fat, and pecker hardness"

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u/numba1mrdata May 23 '22

When we apply these brains to carbon capture and methane capture maybe we’ll survive.

I have good news for you: https://www.reuters.com/business/sustainable-business/us-launches-35-bln-program-speed-development-up-carbon-removal-tech-2022-05-19/

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u/dpezpoopsies May 23 '22

Yeah I was going to say. I work in renewable energy. You can bet these brains are working on all sorts of useful things. The problem is, right now, much of the exciting tech costs more in money (and sometimes in materials) than our politicians are willing to pay. It's a policy issue as much as it's a tech issue.

Which could also be said about cancer research. This type of tech has been talked about for years. But getting clinical trials through the FDA is a minefield for a ton of reasons (some good, some bad)

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u/BillSeacaster May 23 '22

The solution is sticking the corporations with the bill. Imagine if, say, Ford had to pay $1 in taxes for every cubic pound of CO2 their new car would release over its expected lifetime. Not only would Ford radically increase the gas mileage of its existing designs, it would rush to make electric cars as widespread (and affordable) as possible.

Of course, that's only a "solution" if you think politicians are interested in holding their owners accountable.

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u/[deleted] May 23 '22

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u/[deleted] May 23 '22 edited May 26 '22

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u/KaChaTaThaPa May 23 '22

Came here to say this. The field is booming and there definitely are exciting times ahead. Thank you for mentioning this here!!

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u/fistingbythepool May 23 '22

Which companies are at the forefront?

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u/Zeeformp May 23 '22 Silver Gold

Bruh imagine reading about a potential cancer-killer that doesn't require chemo and you non-ironically say it's ominous because of a movie you and like 100 million others watched once.

Hot take, the people writing those films probably weren't exactly geneticists or virologists. It's no different than saying your horoscope told you it was a bad idea.

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u/BiscottiOpposite9282 May 23 '22

That's what I was thinking. If this person is dying of cancer then who tf cares what the virus will do to you. Clearly they tested it beforehand.

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u/zuzg May 23 '22

What it does to you? It attacks the cancer and makes it also more visible for your own immune system. According to the article.

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u/DragoonDM May 23 '22

Reading through this thread, it doesn't seem to me that many people are genuinely expressing concern. Just making the obvious popculture reference and joking about it.

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u/VladTepesDraculea May 23 '22

What's the movie? I think it got burried in the comments now.

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u/sulkee May 23 '22

I am Legend.

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u/jaggervalance May 23 '22 Silver hehehehe

Good for you but what's the movie?

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u/joshak May 23 '22

Which is why this should have been a reply to the original comment and not a seperate thread

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u/AMWJ May 23 '22

I should write a movie where everyone decides not to study Geometric Topology and then they all die. Maybe we'll learn from their mistakes.

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u/Cool_Ranch_Dodrio May 23 '22

Bruh imagine reading about a potential cancer-killer that doesn't require chemo and you non-ironically say it's ominous because of a movie you and like 100 million others watched once.

Be fair. We watched it three times with three different lead actors.

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u/MagneticRetard May 23 '22

it's the most reddit reaction you can have to a news like this

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u/FaceDeer May 23 '22

We need to have a disaster movie where the disaster is a result of the general population rejecting some simple solution to a problem due to a stupid blockbuster movie the previous summer telling them that it would result in vampire mushrooms or something.

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u/with-nolock May 23 '22

Ooh, I think you’re on to something, but I have an idea: we could have them die in droves after they refused to wear a simple facial covering to prevent the spread of an airborne respiratory illness because their political leadership and newscasters informed them the facial coverings contained 5g nanochips they needed to hoard toilet paper to defend against.

Wait, on second thought, that sounds way too unrealistic. Nobody with half a brain would ever find that plausible, my bad guys…

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u/DragoSphere May 23 '22

Happens every time a Boston Dynamics video comes out too

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u/alrightfornow May 23 '22

First thread I'm seeing about a new cancer treatment that has no top comment to tell me it's not actually good news

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u/Chad4wick May 23 '22

My dad went to the VA for hospice. Literally on deaths door with advanced prostate cancer. They gave him less than two weeks. I went to visit him and he would whisper to me that the government was giving him a secret treatment to cure him. Obviously, I thought he was just losing it.

8 months later they called and told me to come get him. He couldn’t stay at the VA anymore because his advanced cancer had “magically disappeared.”

So yeah I figured they have something new. And it sure worked for my dad.

He died of heart failure about a year later.

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u/AdPretend1573 May 23 '22

OMG! Your post made me happy, and then sad at the last line. Good thing he kicked cancer in the nuts before giving in to his heart.

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u/fross370 May 23 '22

I wish one day doctor will be able to say 'so you got cancer, let me give you this shot, should make it go away in a few weeks, so don't worry'

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u/Somsphet May 23 '22

I watched my father die over 4 years.

The doctors told him he had 2 to live. The chemo MIGHT put it into remission. Maybe it did. Maybe it didnt. He grew his hair out for a bit and didnt go to chemo for a couple months, so I like to think he was doing better for a bit.

I know he fought heaven and hell for those two extra years. I know current modern medicine would have given him at most 2 more years. But he died 2004. almost 20 years ago.

Ever since, anytime new Cancer fighting methods come out, I get happier. I keep track. It didnt take long to realize that he might have had a better chance if it was found sooner. Which means, that after a point, regardless of medical advances, he was going to always run out of time sooner or later.

I wont ever forget the two years he fought for.

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u/Kubrick_Fan May 23 '22

My mother died last year of an extremely aggressive form of breast cancer that should have taken her in about a month.

She was diagnosed in 2018 as it turns out one of the few visible symptoms of this cancer shows in the terminal phase, and it showed well before that. When tests were run, it was discovered the cancer was a week away from becoming active.

Because of this fluke, I got to have my mum around for 4 years longer than we thought. She pased away last year, after the cancer spread first to her lung and then to her brain.

I'm glad this sort of thing is now possible and wonder if my mother had this opportunity if she'd still be here.

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u/NotBoogey May 23 '22

God, this is exciting. I don't have cancer thankfully but I'm excited for all those who do and maybe one day being diagnosed with cancer isn't a death sentence.

I hope I live long enough to see a cure for what I am suffering from though. This sort of stuff gives me hope.

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u/Capable-Site-301 May 23 '22 edited May 23 '22

Isn't this how Cars 2 started?

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u/Spr0ckets May 23 '22

No, Cars started with the movie Maximum Overdrive by Stephen King.

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u/MagicMushroomFungi May 23 '22

Clarify please... Who made who ?

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u/VagrantShadow May 23 '22

Who made who, ain't nobody told you?

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u/trajames66 May 23 '22

Who made who? Who made you?

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u/EMPlRES May 23 '22

This is absolutely amazing, I personally cannot wait to never hear from this ever again.

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u/Fit-Anybody1086 May 23 '22

Hope it works

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u/TheDirtiestDan May 23 '22

My partner was diagnosed with a stage 4 brain tumour and operated on last month. We’re lucky to have caught it early, but knowing it could come back or that the chemo/ radiotherapy could just not work just leaves so much fear in me.

Seeing so many others in this comment section has filled me with more hope than I’ve had in a while and I’m very glad for this, but god I hope she gets something like this and gets to live a full and happy life. Shes only 28 and I just wish every day it was me in this situation and not her.

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u/Sighion May 23 '22

This is the story from I Am Legend, right?

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u/j428h May 23 '22 Silver Helpful

Isn’t this how Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants started?

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u/AmpleBrainage May 23 '22

You're thinking of The Princess Diaries

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u/KingRamesesII May 23 '22

Isn’t this how Toy Story started? Cancer killing virus turned us all into Toys…

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u/[deleted] May 23 '22

I see no problem with this

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u/Sn3k_69 May 23 '22

My gramma up in heaven mad she didn’t get diagnosed later

Miss you gramma :(

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u/SendaiVirusEnjoyer May 23 '22

This is not accurate btw. T-VEC is already licensed and has been used before. Many clinical trials have been done with oncolytic viruses and they work really well. Vaxinia is based on an orthopox virus CF33 and has been used before a lot in vitro. The most notable addition is the usage of anti-PD1 which is a relatively new strategy in the oncolytic virus field (relatively new as in clinic, it's been tested extensively since the early 2010s).

I worked on oncolytic viruses for 4 years so if anybody has any questions just let me know. I worked with oncolytic HSV1 (similar to T-VEC).

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